Cayman Technical Data

Planet-9 FAQ

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Battery Drain

There are two key things to take away from this data:

1. You should NOT leave the key in the ignition switch when you park your Cayman. It draws 1.7 amps (after time delay loads shutdown) with the key in the ignition switch. This is about 100 times the load when the key is removed - and enough to drain your battery within a couple of days! Note that if you listen carefully, you can hear multiple solenoids and/or relays energize when you insert the key without turning it. These things take a LOT of current. Note that 1.7A this is more current that the Boothe Design and Deltran battery maintainers can put out. So with the key in the ignition switch and one of these maintainers connected, your battery will still drain!

2. It does not matter whether or not you lock the doors when you leave the car in storage with the key removed. The idle current once everything (interior lights, dashboard, etc.) times out and shuts down is about 15 milliamps (0.015 amps) - independent of whether the doors are locked or not. A heathly and fully charged battery should be able to easily support this load for several weeks without problems.

Here's a summary of the steps I took and the measurements using a high quality digital amp meter in series with the battery. Note that current readings vary up & down by a several 10's of milliamps when the various electronic systems are active, until they eventually time out and shutdown from lack of door lock, door switch and ignition activity. This is likely controlled by timers within the various electronic control modules and/or CAN bus commands to shutdown these systems.

One thing that I have not measured (yet) is how much below the ~15mA level the load drops after 7 days idle time. This is when the Cayman shuts down the receiver for the remote key locking system. One can assume this load drops even further after the 7 day timeout.

Amps Cayman state
--------------------------------------------
0.12 Car locked, boot & trunk closed
0.05 Same - after a few minutes (load timeout & shutdown?)
4 Unlock doors - interior lights turn on
4.8 Open drivers door
5.2 Sit in driver's seat & close the door
1.8 Lock doors - interior lights fade out
5 Insert key in ignition switch - interior lights still on
8.5 Turn ignition switch on without starting car
2 Ignition switch off but still in switch - after interior lights fade out
4.7 Remove key from ignition switch - interior lights back on
5 Place key back in ignition switch without turning - interior lights on
2.2 Key remaining in ignition switch, off, after interior lights fade off
1.9 Same - after instrument panel shuts down (odo, speedo, etc off)
4.7 Remove key from ignition switch - interior lights back on
1.1 Exit car and lock with key remote - interior lights faded off
0.1 Wait a couple minutes (more load timeout & shutdown?)
0.015 Approximately 20 minutes after locking car
(and continuously for the next 24 hrs)
-----
0.015 Key removed, doors unlocked, after a few minutes and for the next hour
-----
1.7 A few minutes after placing key in ignition switch (without turning),
and closing doors - interior lights have faded & other loads time out
(and continuously for the next hour)
 

FAQ Information:

This FAQ was written by L8Apx
Last Revised: December, 2007

Brakes

TECHNICAL INFORMATION

BRAKES

Description:

The standard Cayman S brakes are comprised of four-piston, monobloc aluminum calipers and cross-drilled, internally vented discs. The brakes are additionally cooled by special air cooling vents from the front of the car.

Disc sizes are Front 12.52" x 1.1" (318mm x 28mm), Rear 11.7" x 0.9" (299mm x 24mm)

Minimum wear measurement on both front and rear rotors is 2mm below starting thickness (as confirmed by a PCA tech representative).

A good view of the Porsche Calipers

Safety is very important to Porsche.  Some quotations:

"As with all Porsche vehicles, brakes are a critical component to safe driving, so during vehicle development they are put through rigorous testing. For example, before brakes are approved for production, they must be able to go through 25 consecutive cycles involving full acceleration to top speed, followed by deceleration to 62 mph (100 km/h) without fading." (source)

"... standard braking system [is] (s)everal times more powerful than the flat-six engine, the brakes are crucial to the overall performance of each car." (source)

REFERENCES:

Porsche

Worldcarfans

Product Information, Cayman S

FAQ Information:

This FAQ was written by chows4us

Last Revised: January, 2007

Additional Information by JackWood

 

 

 

 


 

Fluids

Various Fluids in the Cayman are found here.

Gearing, Speeds, Performance

TECHNICAL INFORMATION

TECHNICAL INFORMATION

MANUAL TRANSMISSION

Description:

They Cayman S uses a six-speed, short throw gearbox with a dual-mass flywheel and hydraulic clutch.

The Final-drive ratio is  3.88:1

GEAR RATIO MAX SPEED
(@ 7,000 RPM)
1 3.31 42 mph
2 1.95 72 mph
3 1.41 100 mph
4 1.13 125 mph
5 .97 145 mph
6 .82 171 mph

REFERENCES:

More Information:


Performance testing by automobile journalists is published by many publications.   Performance testing can vary based on a wide-variety of factors. Some of these factors may be temperature, humidity, driver ability, RPMs at launch, etc.  In an ideal world, all testing would be done on the same day under the same conditions with the same car and same driver but in reality, this will most likely never occur.  Hence, there is a wide-variety of published performance figures for the Cayman. 

A summary of Cayman and Cayman S published performance figures can be found below and also here.

Despite the testing variables, its fairly easy to see the pattern summarized as follows:

0 - 60 MPH          4.8 seconds

0 - 100 MPH     ~11.8 seconds

1/4 mile            ~13.3 seconds

Skidpad            ~.96g (there is a wide variance here from .92g to 1.01g)

Slalom               ~72 mph (another wide variance from 69.1 to 74.4)

Note: Road and Track's 74.4 mph dethrones the Porsche Boxster S record of 73.9 MPH

REFERENCES:


2.7-liter 987 Cayman

Road Test Information

Acceleration / Speed

Handling

Braking

Model

Specification

Source

0-60 mph

0-100 mph

60-100 mph

¼ Mile

Max mph

Skidpad

Slalom

60-0 (ft)

70-0 (ft)

80-0 (ft)

Cayman

US, 2986 lbs, 2.7L
245 bhp, 201 lb-ft

Edmunds
12/20/2006

5.8

n/a

n/a

14.2 sec
@ 99.3 mph

n/a

0.93g

Ed.
70.2-mph

112 ft

n/a

n/a

Cayman

ROW, 2870 lbs, 2.7L
245 bhp, 201 lb-ft

Road & Track
January 2007

5.3

13.6

8.3

13.9 sec
@ 100.9 mph

n/a

0.90g

R&T
69.9-mph

110 ft

n/a

194 ft


3.4-liter 987 Cayman S

Road Test Information

Acceleration / Speed

Handling

Braking

Model

Specification

Source

0-60 mph

0-100 mph

60-100 mph

¼ Mile

Max mph

Skidpad

Slalom

60-0 (ft)

70-0 (ft)

80-0 (ft)

Cayman S

ROW, 2955 lbs, 3.4L
295 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Road & Track
November 2005

4.8

11.7

6.9

13.3 sec
@ 106.2 mph

171 (est)

0.96g

R&T
71.7-mph

110 ft

n/a

190 ft

Cayman S

ROW, 3100 lbs, 3.4L
291 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Car and Driver
November 2005

5.1

12.0

6.9

13.4 sec
@ 105 mph

171 (est)

n/a

n/a

n/a

147 ft

n/a

Cayman S

ROW, 2954 lbs, 3.4L
295 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Autocar
01/24/2006

5.1

12.0

6.9

n/a

171

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Cayman S

US, 2954 lbs, 3.4L
295 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Edmunds
01-30-2006

5.0

n/a

n/a

13.2 sec
@ 105 mph

n/a

n/a

Ed.
72.2-mph

106 ft

n/a

n/a

Cayman S

US, 2974 lbs, 3.4L
291 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Car and Driver
March 2006

5.3

12.2

6.9

13.6 sec
@ 105 mph

171 (est)

0.96g

n/a

n/a

165 ft

n/a

Cayman S

US, 3088 lbs, 3.4L
295 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Motor Trend
April 2006

4.8

11.9

7.1

13.3 sec
@ 104.6 mph

n/a

0.94g

MT
72.2-mph

109 ft

n/a

n/a

Cayman S

US, 3122 lbs, 3.4L
295 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Car and Driver
August 2006

4.8

11.4

6.6

13.3 sec
@ 107 mph

166

0.99g

n/a

n/a

154 ft

n/a

Cayman S

US, 3109 lbs, 3.4L
295 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Motor Trend
August 2006

4.8

11.8

7.0

13.3 sec
@ 105.0 mph

n/a

1.01g

MT
69.1-mph

116 ft

n/a

n/a

Cayman S

US, 3139 lbs, 3.4L
295 bhp

Road & Track
August 2006

4.8

11.4

6.6

13.2 sec
@ 106.5 mph

n/a

0.98g

R&T
74.2-mph

112 ft

n/a

195 ft

Cayman S

US, 3150 lbs, 3.4L
295 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Road & Track
September 2006

4.9

12.2

7.3

13.4 sec
@ 105.3 mph

n/a

0.95g

R&T
70.6-mph

116 ft

n/a

203 ft

Cayman S

US, 2954 lbs, 3.4L
295 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Edmunds
Oct 09, 2006

5.0

n/a

n/a

13.3 sec
@ 104.4 mph

n/a

0.94g

Ed.
72.1-mph

105 ft

n/a

n/a

Cayman S

US, 2954 lbs, 3.4L
295 bhp, 251 lb-ft

Autoweek
11/06/2006

5.0

n/a

n/a

13.6 sec
@ 104.9 mph

n/a

0.92g

AW
45.5-mph

112 ft

n/a

n/a


RUF
987 Variants

Road Test Information

Acceleration / Speed

Handling

Braking

Model

Specification

Source

0-60 mph

0-100 mph

60-100 mph

¼ Mile

Max mph

Skidpad

Slalom

60-0 (ft)

70-0 (ft)

80-0 (ft)

RK Coupé

ROW, 3210 lbs, 3.8L
440 bhp, 347 lb-ft

Road & Track
November 2006

3.8

9.2

5.4

12.2 sec
@ 115.7 mph

n/a

0.96g

R&T
70.1-mph

117 ft

n/a

200 ft

FAQ Information:

This FAQ was written by chows4us

Last Revised: May, 2008

General Technical Specs

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

Source

More Information

ENGINE

  • 3.4L mid-engined
  • 295 BHP @ 6,250 RPMs
  • 251 ft. lbs
  • 11:1 Compression Ratio
  • Integrated Dry Sump
  • 2 Stage air intake
  • Separate coils for each plug
  • VarioCam Plus technology
  • 6-Speed Manual transmission with dual flywheels (tiptronic available)

SUSPENSION

  • McPherson-strut
  • Variable steering ratio, power-assisted (hydraulic)

SAFETY

  • PSM
  • ABS
  • 4 piston monoblock brakes
  • POSIP
  • Immobilizer
  • Seatbelt Pretensioners

DIMENSIONS

  • 172.1" Length
  • 70.9" Width (w/o mirrors)
  • 51.4" Height
  • 95.1" Wheel Base
  • .29 Cd
  • 2,860 Lbs Unladen Weight (e.g., no gas)
  • 3,560 Lbs Max Permissible Weight
  • 5.3 Cubic Feet, Front Trunk Volume
  • 9.2 Cubic Feet, Rear Hatch Volume
  • 16.9 Gallons, Fuel Tank

ENVIRONMENT

  • 36.6 MPG Extra Urban ("This cycle is conducted immediately following the urban cycle and consists of roughly half steady-speed driving and the remainder accelerations, decelerations, and some idling. Maximum speed is 75mph (120km/h), average speed is 39mph (63 km/h) and the distance covered is 4.3 miles") Source
  • 20 MPG City (Urban)
  • 28 MPG Highway
  • 254/262 CO2 emissions (g/km)

FAQ Information:

This FAQ was written by chows4us

Last Revised: December, 2006

Over Revving

Over Revs

Description:

The Cayman's DME (Digital Motor Electronics) records the number of ignition cycles that occur when the engine speed passes 7,300 RPMs.  It also records the 'hour' of operation in which the incident took place.  These records can be retrieved by using a PIWIS.  This information can be used by a Porsche dealer to deny a warranty claim when abuse is the cause, or by a potential buyer to identify abuse of a used Cayman.

There are six ranges of over-revving that are logged by the DME:

Range Rev Speed Comments
1 7,300 - 7,499 RPM Ranges 1-3 can be achieved by bumping into the rev limiter (more likely if a car is driven in Sport Chrono Sport Mode).  Ignition cycles here are no cause for concern. The Cayman engine is considered mechanically safe beyond 7,900 RPMs, but revving beyond this range is going to result in extra ordinary wear and stress. 
2 7,500 - 7,699 RPM
3 7,700 - 7,899 RPM
4 7,900 - 8,399 RPM This ranges (and beyond) can only be achieved by a miss-downshift and these speeds are pushing the range of physical damage.  Carefully inspect the number of ignition cycles that have been recorded in this area.
5 8,400 - 9,499 RPM If the engine is still running, it is likely that it's been stressed or damaged and may suffer a premature death.  Listen for rod knock and/or valve noise. If you have over-revs in this range, it's very likely that your dealership may deny warranty service.
6 9,500 - 11,000 RPM If the engine hit this range, it exploded.  There is no way this thing is still running.

Don't be alarmed if you see 1,000 or more cycles in a range.  That sounds like a lot, but keep in mind that a Cayman engine sees 3 ignition cycles per revolution.  You can determine how much time was spent in the range by using the following formula: Time at Over Rev = Ignition Cycles / (RPM/20) .  So, 1,000 cycles would be less than 3 seconds, or more likely, three 1 second bumps into the rev limiter.

It is possible to use aftermarket software to erase over-rev records, so this test should not be used as a definitive or exclusive identifier of abuse.  If buying a used Cayman, a pre purchase inspection conducted by an experienced Porsche repair shop or dealership is a very smart move.


Informative Threads: Overrev Issue , Rev Limiter - What you need to know , Engine Blown


FAQ Information:

This FAQ was written by Gator Bite.
Last Revised: June 2009

Check Engine Light - CEL

North American Caymans have 4 oxygen (02) sensors in the exhaust, 2 on either side. These are positioned 1 before the first catalytic converter (often called a pre-cat or header-cat) and 1 just after the first catalytic converter.  European Caymans have only the first sensor.

The first of these sensors measures the oxygen in the exhaust stream to determine how lean or how rich the engine is running and this information is acted upon by the ECU and the fuel, etc. is changed accordingly.

The second sensor, the one after the catalytic convertor has the job of measuring the oxygen levels again and reporting those to the ECU. The sole purpose of these 2nd sensors is to measure the efficiency of catalytic converter. Is it doing the job it is supposed to do. Porsche has values set in your ECU for the range that it expects to see, if the sensors report values outside of this range for a period of time it can trip a Check Engine Light (CEL) because the computer thinks that something is wrong with the catalytic converter.

So let's take an example with some hypothetical values.

First let's say that Porsche will accept values from 3 to 7 as reported by the 2nd O2 sensor as being within operating tolerances. 3 being less scrubbed, 7 being more scrubbed in other words at a value of 3 there are more pollutants getting through than at value 7.

Your car runs the factory 800 cell catalytic convertor, it scrubs the exhaust and the resulting value is 5. 5 is between 3 and 7 so the computer thinks things are A-OK.

Now you go install a set of headers on your car with "race" cats. These are typically 100 or 200 cell high flow cats, meaning they don't scrub the exhaust as much. You fire up your car and now the value the sensor sees is a 2.

Guess what happens? That's right you trip a check engine light. Your ECU thinks something is wrong with your catalytic converter.

Is something "wrong"?  Well not really your race cat is probably working as it should, it just doesn't scrub the exhaust stream by design as much as the more restrictive and more scrubbing factory catalytic convertor would be.

Alternatively you could install headers with no cats and be guaranteed that the second sensor is going to see a 0 (no scrubbing) which is outside the range of the 3 to 7.

Q. - Why do I sometimes get CEL and sometimes not?

A. - Several reasons. First off, the checking of the exhaust and comparing values isn't just a static check all the time, Porsche has put in startup procedures and the table varies by condtions that other sensors report as well, it isn't a static 3 to 7. So what is likely happening is that sometimes you will trip a CEL given certain conditions and sometimes not given other conditions and the variations and permutations that take place. Things like gas quality, temperatures, humidity, length of operating time, etc. can all play a part into whether or not your values that the ECU sees end up tripping a CEL. Additionally, some CELs get tripped but stored and not reported until another one happens so you may have tripped something and not know it until you trip it again, more subtle nuances in the Porsche ECUs.

It has also been reported that some "race" cats are better (do more scrubbing) than others despite having the same cell counts. While this may well be true, and undoubtedly there will be variations between and even within manufacturers, there is no way to know without some sort of bench testing whether or not any header and aftermarket catalytic converter combo you buy will trip a CEL or not.

Q. How can I stop the CEL if I get one?

A. There are 2 proven methods for stopping the CEL related to this cause.

1) ECU reprogramming

ECU reprogramming can change the values that the ECU accepts for tripping a CEL. For example if you changed the values to accept 0-9 and you were producing a 2, then your 2 would be within range. Alternatively some ECU tuning will make the value static, for example always reporting a "5" regardless of the real conditions. Still other tuning will put the sensors into a standby state so that they are not queried at all. You need to research an ECU tuner (several are sponsors here) and ask them how their ECU tuning software handles the second 02 sensor issue. Some do not do anything about it at all.

2) O2 sensor relocation

O2 sensor relocation involves relocating the 2nd O2 sensor further back in the exhaust stream, sometimes after a muffler or secondary catalytic convertor if one exists. Sometimes the relocation works, and sometimes it doesn't depending upon the car, where relocated, efficiencies of any cats in the system, etc. Relocation may require that the 02 wiring harness is lengthened, although some have reported successful relocation without any need to lengthen the wiring harness. This work is typically done by a muffler shop or someone who can weld on a bung for the O2 sensor to be screwed into and make the proper modifications.

Q. What are the codes that are tripped?

A. Typically the codes are either 421 or 431 (P0421 and P0431 on some readers or P421 or P431 on others). These represent catalytic converter efficiency for the left and right banks of the exhaust.

Q. My factory header and cats have tripped a check engine light, how come?

A. The only situation where this has been reported to date has been with early 2006 Cayman S's.  Evidently, Porsche used a cat with fewer cells and the table values were more restrictive.  Porsche's solution was to release new header/cat combos with a higher number of cells.  Additionally, factory ECU tuning was changed in late 2006 to make the ECU accept a wider range of values.  These together have prevented further CELs from occurring.  If you have an early 2006 Cayman S with the original factory header and cats and trip a CEL your dealer will replace your header/cats with a newer set from Porsche under warranty if you are within your warranty period.

FAQ Information:

This FAQ was written by K-Man S.
Last Revised: August 2008

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