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New to the Plant-9 forum, and looking for tips, tricks and suggestions on the replacement of the clutch on a 2007 Cayman S with 31,000 miles, all city driven, hills and short runs.
Reviewing the site, the Sachs clutch is the stock way to go. Looks like I'm heading in that direction, any suggestions, comments on your replacement of the stock clutch, what did you like and not like, and would you do any thing differently. Also looking to do the job myself, so looking for any tips and tricks to make the job go smoother and get me back on the road. I plan on some track times with the club, learning how to drive the car properly, no racing yet. Thanks in advance for your input
 

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I paid $700 for a stock clutch and flywheel. $700 labor to install. I have done much wrench work but just did not want to do this clutch. The main problem is, the exhaust bolts will snap off. Not sure how many but a few on mine. You will also need a triple square socket. Most of the bolts are normal but not all. Not sure on the size of the triple square. The job seems pretty straight forward.
 

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Go with the stock Sachs unit and the Luk dual mass flywheel , don’t do one or the other because you’ll be doing it again soon. Also make sure you torque the bolts properly(especially the pressure plate) , On my car a Porsche dealer did not do it right and it just cost me 5k to do it all again 6 months later. Take it slow and pay attention , it really isn’t that hard they did it in like 4 hours. The trans just comes out once the exhaust is off and a few other bolts.
Can save a ton of money if you do it right I’m sure it’ll cost you maybe $1400 for what I paid 5k to do. I don’t have a lift anymore so I can’t do it
 

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It is fairly straightforward but there are a few sticky spots. The most important thing is to have all of the right tools. One of the bellhousing bolts is in a really tight spot, so make sure you have the stubby triple square from Snap-on. You also need the flywheel lock to properly tighten its bolts. The hardest part for me was fitting the transmission back onto the bellhousing. It needs to be in exactly the right orientation to slide on and the engine needs to be supported with the proper special tool.

If you're an experienced DIYer you can surely do it and save a lot of money, but get the right tools and set aside plenty of time. Good luck!
 

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Replace everything while you are there. Flywheel bolts, pilot bearing, throw out bearing and Rear main seal. Unless it is leaking don't mess with IMS cover since you need to lock the cams to take that off. Some will remove it to open the seals on the bearing to improve oil flow. Lastly, think about shifter cables since you will have everything apart. Planned on mine and they broke during disassembly.
 
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You will also need a triple square socket. Most of the bolts are normal but not all. Not sure on the size of the triple square.
It's an M10, I was able to get one from the local parts store's tool section, it was handy to have a portion of it use a 10mm hex so that you could fit it into the confined space with a box end wrench on it:

269462
 

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I just driven a Cayman with 3.8L swap and BBI light flywheel. I would explore the BBi Flywheel with a oem clutch replacement
 

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There is a large thread on Cayman Register, including my posts, about this task. I did my own five years ago on my '06 CS, borrowed the special tools needed (biggest help is the engine support tool) and took my time. I had help actually pulling the transale out and replacing it, otherwise I did everything solo. It took me two days of careful, measured work with lots of breaks('Im old) and not being in a hurry. I spent about $500 on parts and maybe bought $50 worth of new tools which I don't count as they will be used again. I ended up having to pull the transaxle again one day after finishing as their was a seal missing from the parts list that I missed and fluid was leaking out. It took me two hours the second time to do all the work including pulling the exhaust, and barely over 2 to replace everything. Its all about knowing what you're doing. I suggest finding the Register thread and reading everything in it before starting the work. YMMV.
 
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