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One of my considerations for my next track car, before buying my '06 Cayman S, was a 2015 Mustang 5.0. Today I drove one for the first time, just to see what it was like. (Coincidentally, the gentleman who sold me the Cayman had just bought a new Mustang himself, albeit the 6 cylinder turbo version.) I love muscle cars, and raced a 5.0 way back in the day, so it was fun to check a new one out.

I drove a manual 5.0 GT Premium, which had all the goodies. I didn’t wring it out, but got in enough of a drive to get an impression. First impression--it’s big—the hood stretches way out in front. It’s also extremely tight—not a squeak, shake, or rattle to be heard. The steering was very nice, and the brake feel—it had Brembos—was great. Better than the Cayman. As was the shifter—nice short, tight throws, way better than the Cayman's kind of vague cable linkage. The interior, while having a few “retro” cues I’m not wild about, has a very nice feel an high quality materials--not quite as as nice as the Cayman.

The thing has plenty of beans, though it didn’t feel quite as strong as I expected. Redline is 6500, and first and second gears are so short they go by in a flash—I was poking the rev limiter regularly. Since it’s a fuel cutout type, it made for some jerky driving—just as things really start to rock, it falls flat on its face. One would quickly adapt, I’m sure. And nothing compares to an angry American V8 in the sound department. Only an air-cooled 6 at full song gives the same aural thrill.

I drove the Cayman when I got home, and it reinforced that I made the right choice. The Mustang, while tons of fun, is a broadsword to the Cayman’s dagger. And my car, albeit modified with intake, exhaust, and a reflash, feels nearly as strong, and I’ll bet I’d be quicker around the track. Like the Corvette, the Mustang feels like you are strapped to a big heavy missile, while the Cayman feels like an extension of your body. It’s hard to beat the dynamics of a mid-engine car. And, with examples like mine in the mid-20s, it’s a real bargain—I think one of the best bang for the buck cars out there right now.

So, the Mustang remains a very cool car I’d love to own, but not as a substitute or replacement for the Cayman.

Terry
 

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Amen brother!
 

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I had an Ecoboost and automatic as a rental a few months ago. The car had 15 miles on it, so I was the first one to drive it. My feelings were the same as yours, it was nice but not a replacement. Porsche is just better than most out there, and it is hard to find a replacement
 

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I've been a mustang fan for a while. Owned a few 65-67s , few 80s 4cyl turbo, v6 and v8 cars as well as some as new as a 07 gt/CS. I've always wanted a Porsche since I was a kid but honestly assumed they were just out of reach.

Just recently I wanted a new car and went looking at p-cars. I found I liked the caymans. Like you I drove them all - even considering cars with a much higher msrp. With the Mustangs they still felt like the older ones where they were much better once you did a CAI, tune and exhaust. The Cayman was a great car out of the box. I have had my car for 10 days now and wish I'd have gone this route sooner.


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I had the displeasure of having to ride in 2 Mustangs at the last 2 HPDE's. I drove each for 2 laps first to show the students the lines, then I was stuck as a passenger for the rest of their sessions. Horrible handling, lousy turn in, no traction on corner exit, tons of body roll.... If you want a straight line rocket, get on, otherwise they are about the same as they were in the 70's
 
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