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Searched and not sure I found an answer to my question - Have a 2014 Cayman with about 15K miles on it. After a recent trip up north, I have noticed the suspension feels "softer", that there is more bounce when driving over surface bumps etc. Mind you, I am very careful to avoid big bumps. cracks, dips. slips, holes, gaps and other aspects of our crumbling highway system. At times it feels like a Camry going over bumps - that the suspension affect has lessened.

So my questions are:

1) Is it normal with this mileage for the suspension to soften? No sports suspension.
2) Has anyone else experienced anything similar to this?
3) Is it worth it to take the car in and have it checked out?

There are no other symptoms like strange nosies, loss of control etc., and my tires pressure is set correctly. Any ideas or feedback and I would really appreciate it.
 

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My car is a base and have noted some porpoising on uneven roads, although this is rare - most of the time I find the car to be very nicely set-up. I'm at 6500 km and have noted [perhaps] a bit of softening up of the suspension from new, but in a good way with more ride suppleness.
 

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its normal for suspension to soften. Chances are its just normal. but if you're concerned take it to the dealership
 

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It isn't normal for your suspension to soften in a year.
I would have to agree.

You stated more bounce over bumps. If so, that would be damper related and I find it very hard that your dampers have changed in 15k miles. You also stated Camry like??? That's quite the statement and leads me to believe there is something going on that's not right. I too have standard suspension and would never use that phrase to describe the feel. I'd guess you are exaggerating, no?
 

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Just a thought, but others have reported here similar issues and discovered that shipping blocks were never removed from the suspension by the dealers during prep. If you've had your car a while that's pretty unlikely, but if it's only a month old, maybe.
 
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Searched and not sure I found an answer to my question - Have a 2014 Cayman with about 15K miles on it. After a recent trip up north, I have noticed the suspension feels "softer", that there is more bounce when driving over surface bumps etc. Mind you, I am very careful to avoid big bumps. cracks, dips. slips, holes, gaps and other aspects of our crumbling highway system. At times it feels like a Camry going over bumps - that the suspension affect has lessened.

So my questions are:

1) Is it normal with this mileage for the suspension to soften? No sports suspension.
2) Has anyone else experienced anything similar to this?
3) Is it worth it to take the car in and have it checked out?

There are no other symptoms like strange nosies, loss of control etc., and my tires pressure is set correctly. Any ideas or feedback and I would really appreciate it.
There are two things you can check. First put the car in the air and check to make sure the shocks are not leaking .if they are you will see wetness at the base of the pistons. The second thing is do a hard stop from 15 or 20 miles an hour the car should dip and then come up and stop if it dips again the shocks are soft. If you do it at night it's easier to tell because the lights exaggerate the bounce. If both of these test okay there's really nothing a dealer is going to do for you. Good luck. Carl
 

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It's best to have someone very familiar with these cars to have a drive. Chances are your dampers have just settled in a bit since you bought the car. The stock suspension actually is a little on the soft side if you ask me. Some bounce does exist there on the last 981 CS I drove with about 10,000 miles on the odometer.

However, it's tough to diagnose the problem as everyone's tolerance and definition of bounce varies. With a few slalom type of moves in an empty parking lot, along with a few braking tests ... one should be able to determine whether your dampers are having problems to begin with. Good luck
 

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I have found that my 981 with PASM will bounce on certain roads where the expansion joints set up a resonance.
The only thing to be done is to find a different speed to break the resonance or avoid the road.-Richard
 

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There are two things you can check. First put the car in the air and check to make sure the shocks are not leaking .if they are you will see wetness at the base of the pistons. The second thing is do a hard stop from 15 or 20 miles an hour the car should dip and then come up and stop if it dips again the shocks are soft. If you do it at night it's easier to tell because the lights exaggerate the bounce. If both of these test okay there's really nothing a dealer is going to do for you. Good luck. Carl
Those are both great ideas . . . and there is a third idea. We used to do this with our old cars all the time. Just push down on the corners of your car. The corner should go down and bounce right back up and stop.
 

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Those are both great ideas . . . and there is a third idea. We used to do this with our old cars all the time. Just push down on the corners of your car. The corner should go down and bounce right back up and stop.
That doesn't work well on the 981 because it's too stiff. It really works best at night with a quick stop because the lights exaggerate the effect.carl
 

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Those are both great ideas . . . and there is a third idea. We used to do this with our old cars all the time. Just push down on the corners of your car. The corner should go down and bounce right back up and stop.
Be careful where you push. These fenders are thin and you can actually dent the fenders if you chose the wrong spot!
 

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remember the stupid test for shocks back in autoshop days? you and friend bounce a corner and see if it bounces 2.5 times.. you may have a bad corner.

lemon
 

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Concerning the top of the front fenders there is no safe or right spot to push on if you dont want to collapse the metal in. If you press enough to bounce the suspension you will create significant damage. Rear fenders are probably similar. And that bounce test is ridiculous. The damper would have to completely worn and dangerous to drive on if so.
Be careful where you push. These fenders are thin and you can actually dent the fenders if you chose the wrong spot!
 

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I have a '14 Base C with 17K miles. The standard suspension is stunning. As far away from "Camry" as you can get. If you're getting a floating sensation....take it in.
 

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Suggest a test drive with a new one from the dealer over the problem roads.
 

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Thanks for the information from all the experts. I've only been driving Porsches since the 1970s. (I've had a Boxster and I am driving my 3rd Cayman.) I guess I have a lot to learn.

Concerning the top of the front fenders there is no safe or right spot to push on if you dont want to collapse the metal in. If you press enough to bounce the suspension you will create significant damage. Rear fenders are probably similar.
I just went out and tried pushing on the fenders. No damage whatsoever. And I pushed hard enough to make the car move. It didn't move much but it did move. Don't push on the hood. It will bend but the fenders are pretty sturdy. I did get finger prints on my nice wax job but I was able to clean that right up.

And that bounce test is ridiculous. The damper would have to completely worn and dangerous to drive on if so.
Yes, the damper would have be completely worn or lose and that's what the op is trying to figure out. By the way, pushing on the fender was the way that I identified a bad strut bearing on the 987.2 that I had.

:cheers:
 

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Thanks for the information from all the experts. I've only been driving Porsches since the 1970s. (I've had a Boxster and I am driving my 3rd Cayman.) I guess I have a lot to learn.


I just went out and tried pushing on the fenders. No damage whatsoever. And I pushed hard enough to make the car move. It didn't move much but it did move. Don't push on the hood. It will bend but the fenders are pretty sturdy. I did get finger prints on my nice wax job but I was able to clean that right up.


Yes, the damper would have be completely worn or lose and that's what the op is trying to figure out. By the way, pushing on the fender was the way that I identified a bad strut bearing on the 987.2 that I had.

:cheers:
You are welcome! I have been driving Porsches from the 60s and the 981s have some seriously lite walled sheet metal fenders.
 

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It isn't normal for your suspension to soften in a year.
Yep. 981 suspension should not be like Buick's. Not after a year. Mine is still nice and firm after 3/33K miles
 

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You are welcome! I have been driving Porsches from the 60s and the 981s have some seriously lite walled sheet metal fenders.
The fenders are not "seriously lite walled sheet metal fenders". They are made of "deep drawn steel". Yes, the body is light weight. (Porsche's own figures say that it is about 17% lighter than a 987.) Nevertheless the light weight body is not flimsy because deep drawn steel is relatively strong. It is the same steel that goes into the fenders of a Cayenne and a Panamera.

Certainly there are parts of a Cayman/Boxster which will deform. Those parts are aluminum for the most part and they include the hood and the doors. (Part of the chassis is aluminum and it is designed to deform in a crash but that's another subject.) None of the parts of the Porsche - other than the doors and hood - are so flimsy that they will bend with just moderate pressure.

I'm not recommending that you jump up and down on a Cayman/Boxster fender. I'm certainly not recommending that you whack the fender with a mallet. I am saying that a firm push isn't going to dent the fender.

The bottom line is that the Cayman/Boxster is light weight but it is not fragile.
__________________

Most of this information comes from a company called "Trans-Matic". I added the bold type. Deep Drawn Steel is not unique to Porsche.

  • The deep drawn metal stamping process work hardens the metal, resulting in a seamless finished part that is stronger than the base material.
  • When considering the functionality of the end product, deep drawing poses still more advantages. Specifically, the technique is ideal for products that require significant strength and minimal weight. The process is also recommended for product geometries that are unachievable through other manufacturing techniques.
  • Though deep drawing is similar to metal stamping, the terms are not interchangeable.
  • The deep drawing process work hardens the metal, yielding finished parts that are demonstrably stronger than machined or cast metal parts.
 
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