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On May 21, my father passed away. At age 85, he was still enjoying his 1985 Carrera 3.2 Cabriolet. A European version with under 60,000 miles in bright red paint, it is a nice car. And it is also now part of my Dad's estate. What would you choose, a 2007 Cayman S with 6 speed manual (my present car) or the '85 Carrera 3.2 Cabriolet? Why? You might mention some things I had not considered that could influence my decision.

Thank you.

Phil
 

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On May 21, my father passed away. At age 85, he was still enjoying his 1985 Carrera 3.2 Cabriolet. A European version with under 60,000 miles in bright red paint, it is a nice car. And it is also now part of my Dad's estate. What would you choose, a 2007 Cayman S with 6 speed manual (my present car) or the '85 Carrera 3.2 Cabriolet? Why? You might mention some things I had not considered that could influence my decision.

Thank you.

Phil
There are too many factors that only you know regarding this decision: money, how you want or need to use it, what you like, etc. I suspect the Carrera is worth more now and could appreciate in value while the Cayman will likely not. If this is to be your only car, the Cayman is more practical with better luggage space, etc. The convertible is a bit of a pain to use as you need to tack down the tonneau cover whenever the top is down to protect the top and headliner.

If money is not an issue, keep them both. If you just want to decide which you like the best, take each for a drive on Skyline and Highway 84 to the coast, etc. and and on the freeway to see which you prefer.
 

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The sound of the air cooled engine does it for me every time I hear one. Do what your heart tells you is right and you will be happy with your decision.
 

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Not even close to compare. Someday the 3.2 might actually be worth something. The 2007CS is worth maybe 25K now at best and is heading to $15K.

Have the Carrera checked out. Then decide.
 

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A 30+ year old car is close to an antique. Totally different than owning and driving a modern car. Sometimes it's not ready to go when u are. The hassles of owning and caring for an antique Porsche can get old. Only u can decide if u want that. The Euro version has some of its own parts and idiosyncrasies too. And will have some of your memories and feelings of ur dad. It could be an easy decision or could be complicated. Only u can decide...
 

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Sorry for your loss. I'd do whatever I had to do to keep both, even build another garage if necessary. :cheers:
 

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The Carrera is the real deal and they are not making anymore air cooled, the Cayman's will be around for a while to come.
My stable: 1979 911 SC (3.2L) 2010 Cayman S, I feel I have it covered ;-)
 

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Not even close to compare. Someday the 3.2 might actually be worth something. The 2007CS is worth maybe 25K now at best and is heading to $15K.

Have the Carrera checked out. Then decide.
heading to 15K? That may be the 3 to 5 year outlook (maybe) but you gotta think longer term than that... How many folks sold their 50's,60's,70's,80's Ferrari's Porsche's, etc at the ten-year mark only to kick themselves years later for having sold at the bottom?
 

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Try to keep both. If room is an issue, you can rent a cheap storage space and take the Carerra out on nice days think of your father while enjoying the drive.
 

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911. Hands down. Your father's legacy and it's the cooler car.
 

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heading to 15K? That may be the 3 to 5 year outlook (maybe) but you gotta think longer term than that... How many folks sold their 50's,60's,70's,80's Ferrari's Porsche's, etc at the ten-year mark only to kick themselves years later for having sold at the bottom?
You want to compare the value of a 1985, air cooled, 3.2 cabrio 911 to a modern, water cooled, 2007 Cayman S in terms of collectability? A 2007 Cayman S is the equivalent to the 1985 944.

One is an icon, the Porsche franchise, an air cooled 911, the very reason why a Cayman was ever allowed to eventually be built. The other is a modern water cooled car with modern nannies, modern emissions baggage, power (everything), full of federally mandated safety devices - a bloated big third cousin to the much simpler and lighter two seat sports cars of the 1980s.

PCNA sold 3,377 2007 Cayman S cars. Include Germany and the ROW and 7,000 is a reasonable worldwide number. Porsche sold 2529 Carrera 3.2 Cabrios worldwide, 30 years ago, of which PCNA sold 990. How many survivors are left of the 990? The OP has one of the original 990 cars. OTH, Porsche sold 23,720 Porsche 944 worldwide the same year.

These two cars are not even in the same league.

If you want to compare cars in terms of collectibility, compare a 1985 944 (not a 944 Turbo, different league) vs a 2007 Cayman S. NADA says its worth about 6750 retail, Hagerty $6444. $6444 is $2930 in 1985 dollars. MSRP was $21440. So its worthy maybe 14% of original MSRP. Current Black Book 2007 CS trade in value is $15.6 - $23.4 and retail $19.3 - $27.9 on an original $58.9.

Factor into that IMS, oil starvation issues, or whatever the latest thing is with 987.1 engines. Whether or not failure rates are .001% of 100% is not relevant. What is relevant is the buying publics perception of these failure rates. Their perception is their reality. How many people looking to buy a 987.1 used Cayman seek help on any forum asking how to fix their engine upon buying a used car? Now how will that translate in 20 years to a collectible market? How many people on this forum only advise used car buyers not to buy a 987.1 to avoid potential problems?

A 2007CS becoming a true collectible would help the rest of the Porsche market because everything else would just go up much higher in value. So I hope you get your wish, but I'd keep the 1985 911 and bet on the Cayman one day being worth less than a 1985 Porsche 944 is today, in relative terms, simply because of the 987.1 engine issues (real or not).

So if you want to think in equal terms, don't bother trying to compare 924/944/Boxster/Cayman collectabilty potential with air cooled 911 potential. They shouldn't even be discussed in the same sentence. Compare it against normal 924 or 944 of the times, and not a 944 Turbo yet since there is no equivalent until possibly a GT4. Then subtract for potential or perceived engine issues that a collector will not tolerate. Watch those 944 retail prices.
 

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Looking at this gem I can hardly think of any Porsche overshadowing its rare beauty:

911_Carrera.jpg
 

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I have no “wish”one way or the other. I’m happy with mine and I intend to keep it and pass it to my daughter; not because of potential $$$ but because it means something to my family and myself.

Hindsight is20/20. It’s impossible to time the top or bottom of the market but it’s a high-probability that a car (assuming it’s well maintained) has reached the limit of its depreciation between the 8 and 11 year mark. After that, (again,assuming it’s maintained), it will only hold value or appreciate. My point was, in 1994, at the 9 or 10 year point, what was the value? What was the view, at that time, of the potential appreciation of the ’85?

Failure rates and other issues are at this point not relevant to the long-term potential value of the Cayman. Think of the “issues” all the Italian (50’s, ‘60’s, 70’s,and 80’s) and British (50’s, ‘60’s) cars had when they were < 10 years old but that today command high $$$?

Total production numbers in isolation aren’t terribly relevant. What is relevant is the % surviving at the 20 year mark, the 30 year mark, etc. To put it another way, how rare will a particular Cayman be in 2035? I’m not saying the Cayman will become a $$$ car down the road, I’m just saying it’s short-sighted to declare – at the ten year point – it's a foregone conclusion that it won’t be $$$.

Look at the 914... Really clean examples command today a not insignificant $$$ despite the 914 having bee disparaged for all number of reasons.
 

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Very sorry for your loss.

You don't mention if this is a DD, how you'll use it, where you'll park it, but big picture I can offer some perspective:

The downsides to the Carrera as a car are numerous. Safety is perhaps the biggest and least fixable issue- it's simply not as safe in a crash. It's also slightly more likely to get into one with no ABS, etc. Reliability is a more addressable concern, but it will require more maintenance and can be expected to have more ongoing issues. It's a slightly less usable car than your Cayman, with added concerns re parking with the soft top, more commitment required for road trips or the track (probably not recommended), more concerns re damage and miles as the value increases, etc. Finally it obviously has lower absolute performance, it's less comfortable, it's harder to drive both for the average driver and on the limit. In short, viewed purely as a machine, the Carrera simply isn't quite as competent.

Of course these are all matters of degrees- your Cayman is less competent than a 991 Turbo S, but that doesn't mean you should switch. Meanwhile the Carrera is timeless, both in form and motoring experience. It will puts a smiles on faces, it's wonderfully involving, and it offers a unique connection with both automotive history and your own.

Many of these are similar tradeoffs to any vintage car- they naturally require more commitment and effort, and most will find that effort too great for an only car. If you do make the investment, however, the rewards are substantial: you'll be driving more than just a car. You'll need to decide if these trade-offs are ones you want to make, but you're very lucky to have the opportunity and option.
 
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