Planet-9 Porsche Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The front shock on my 987.1 Cayman needs to be replaced.

I have the option to buy used Cayman R front shocks but I was wondering if those would fit a 987.1 Cayman S and if they'd be equivalent to Cayman S OEM or stiffer? Looking at this thread it would seem like shocks are different between the Cayman R and S but was looking for those confirmations:

The car has H&R springs with stock shocks today and I already find the ride extremely stiff for the road, despite the car being 85% track at this point I still like to drive it elsewhere.

At the moment I was contemplating to replace the front shocks with Bilstein B6 which should be a bit better than stock for the track but not going towards much stiffer options, going with used Cayman R shocks would be a lot cheaper... (there is no used cayman S shocks in my area)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
many have described the Cayman R as having a good balance performance wise. Described as Cayman in permanent sport mode. I haven't tried them - I'm running B6 at the moment. B6 is not really comfort oriented but I put up with it for the performance. of course YMMV.

How old are the shocks? if they're too high mileage they may not be at their best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,219 Posts
Shocks, springs rates and ride height are very important to the handling of the Cayman 987. You can cobble together a lot of aftermarket stuff for cheap, but you will get cheap effects. Upgrade your suspension to Ohlin R&T coilovers. You can beat these coilovers to death and they still perform as described on the Ohlin web page. Spring rate of 400 lbs/in f and 458 lbs/in in the rear. You can drop your ride 35mm without affecting the springs or shocks. If you go for the dropped look, be prepared to add a rear adjustable toe link bar due to the toe in adjustments is not attainable without an adjustable link. Also, you will need adjustable down links to get a corner balance to work without preloading your swaybars. You have successfully reduced the weight transfer both across your car as well as f to r with this reduced ride height.

The Ohlin's have 20 clicks of rebound and compression adjustment, which actually do change the dynamics of the suspension a lot. I have used 3 clicks from stiff in f and 4 clicks in the rear on smooth tracks with good success. For the daily drives, I have used 15 clicks from stiff for both f & r to 10 clicks f and r just depending on the tire/wheel weight setup. I use all the track width I can get on my car, so the wheels are leveraged by the offset a lot. What that means is the tires are at the edge of the wheel well, almost hitting the top lip on compression.

For my daily drives, I use the OEM 18 inch rims with Michelin PS4's in 255/35/18 f and 275/35/18 r. This combo seems to work well, but I do get some rear tire grip/traction issues with full throttle. Most likely a 285/35/18 maybe a better choice. The total weight of the tires and OEM wheels seem to work best with the Ohlin rebound setting around 10 for both f and r. Lighter weight wheels and tires opens up the options much more to track work, canyon drives and back country bumpy roads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
@Apex1 Wait, so you're saying that you can't drop 987 (.2 in my situation) on springs without a toe link extension for a proper toe? What toe are you running front/rear? thx
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top