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I have a 2007 Cayman S with standard suspension and 18" wheels. I had 19s but removed them because the roads around here are so bad, I was being beat to death. I am looking at a 2009 Boxster with standard suspension with 19s. Did the standard suspension change from the 987.1 to the 987.2? Is there a difference between the Cayman and Boxster? If the suspension is a bit more compliant on the 987.2 Boxster, I am willing to replace the 19s on the 987.2 Boxster with 18s. But, the end result has to be something perceptibly better than the 987.1 Cayman (w/18s) that I have now. The Cayman is not overly stiffly sprung in design, but on the roads I am often on, I am pummeled.

Phil
 

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I have a 2007 Cayman S with standard suspension and 18" wheels. I had 19s but removed them because the roads around here are so bad, I was being beat to death. I am looking at a 2009 Boxster with standard suspension with 19s. Did the standard suspension change from the 987.1 to the 987.2? Is there a difference between the Cayman and Boxster? If the suspension is a bit more compliant on the 987.2 Boxster, I am willing to replace the 19s on the 987.2 Boxster with 18s. But, the end result has to be something perceptibly better than the 987.1 Cayman (w/18s) that I have now. The Cayman is not overly stiffly sprung in design, but on the roads I am often on, I am pummeled.

Phil
I understand PASM works in both directions from what I've read. On the non sport setting its softer and adapts in that direction. In sport it is much firmer and adapts accordingly. I've got the 19" 997 turbo wheels on my car and it has a nice soft ride when not in sport. You might want to opt for PASM!
 

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I do not have the exact spring rates. The spring rates have been changed when Porsche went from 987.1 to 987.2. The 987.2 springs were supposedly more road compliant. The damper + spring part numbers are different between 987.1 and 987.2.

Unfortunately I don't remember how much softer/stiffer things are between the two generations.
 

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I do not have the exact spring rates. The spring rates have been changed when Porsche went from 987.1 to 987.2. The 987.2 springs were supposedly more road compliant. The damper + spring part numbers are different between 987.1 and 987.2.

Unfortunately I don't remember how much softer/stiffer things are between the two generations.
Zinger & OP:

I don't think spring rates alone would do that. There has to be something else. I have an '06 with PASM. It came with 19's and I was not happy with the ride. I was also not happy with the fact that it seemed to move around like an old buick over interstate dips etc. Impacts were harsh, yet the damping seemed sloppy. I changed to 18" wheels and tires and that really helped the impact issue but I still had this bobbing around on the interstates. Then I bought a used set of Bilstein Damptronic coil-overs for the car. That really fixed the sloppy damping. The ride was a little firmer but not harsh and the car was fixed for me. i then put on TPC sway bars and it started to really corner well too with very little ride deterioration. Get the "quiet links" if you do this and the suspension will not rattle like a race car. Then last year, I got TPC's "DCS" box. This thing replaces the stock Damptronics "brain" and takes minutes to install. It has a faster processor and better suspension logic. On my car with all the other mods, it didn't really help the ride but it corners ever flatter now. It's still pretty good with impacts with Michelin Pilot Supersports.

Point of all this is that, if I'd bought the DSC before the Damptronics, I might never have bought the Damptronics. I think the stock PASM with DSC would make a pretty nice setup and almost anyone can install a DSC box. It's mounted on the right side under the glove box beneath the outside footwall panel. It snaps into a fastener and lifts out with enough wire so you can unplug it easily. It's one of those automotive clip-lock plugs. You just unplug the black PASM box and plug in the gold DSC box, then bury it back under the panel. Rather than fool with the snap-in thing, I just found a piece of foam and wrapped it around the box and stuffed it in there so it won't rattle. I may go back to PASM when I change to my summer tires again just to see how it works. I remember it being a little bit better on low speed neighborhood bumps than the DSC.

DSC gives not two, but three possible ride settings. I use the softest one for under-50mph surface street driving and use the middle setting for interstates. The middle seeing gives me very good high speed rebound control without being harsh.

I just wish I'd have tried this DSC box with the stock PASM shocks. I've heard from people who have and they seem to be happy with the results.

--------

As far as Gen1 vs Gen2 suspensions, I think the Gen2 cars may have more wheel travel or something else that gives them a more mature ride quality. People on this forum seem to be happy with 19's on Gen2s and I've heard a lot of people complain about the ride with Gen1s and 19's. I wish I could tell you what the differences are, but I really don't know. This is only a very anecdotal impression based on posts I read around the time more people were starting tp post about their Gen2 cars. I've got very little seat time in Gen2 cars. All of that was in the passenger's seats of student's cars at race tracks. That is not a good place to judge ride quality.

:cheers:
 

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i remember one of the guys saying that there were a lot of springs and shocks changes a long the years for both pasm and non-pasm cars.
i never went to check part numbers to confirm that - but anybody with a little time and motivation can do that :)
 

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1st and 2nd gen have different part#s, but the part#s are consistent for each run. PASM is reportedly better on the 2nd gen than the 1st. Boxster and Cayman struts and electronics are identical; only the rear spring rates differ, and only slightly.
 

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I believe the OP was referring to the passive suspension though, so the updated PASM program with the 3rd axis for accelerometer doesn't really count. The passive setup would only have difference in sway bars + springs/damper (i.e. the overall coilover) setup.

With the PASM equipped car, then we are looking at something completely different. Similar to the DSC unit, the 987.2 PASM unit is much more active and doesn't give a rock hard suspension in sport mode -- but with only 2 modes. I too have the DSC unit on my 987.1 with Damptronics. I actually enjoy the car very much in this setup. Similar to your experience, I have never managed to try the DSC unit with stock suspension. Sometimes I would prefer to have the slightly longer suspension travel from the stock suspension. The monotube design of the Damptronics seemed to have compromised a bit of wheel travel.

As for Gen1 vs Gen2, the Gen2 cars do not have more wheel travel. I don't think Bilstein/Porsche would have been able to stuff more wheel travel into the same sized twin tube strut (exterior dimensions are same). Remember Cayman R coilovers bolt right on to both 987.1 and 987.2 cars the same way. All the control arms etc are interchangeable (if not all having same part numbers). I haven't compared the part numbers for everything else though.

Anyway, just my 2cents


Zinger & OP:

I don't think spring rates alone would do that. There has to be something else. I have an '06 with PASM. It came with 19's and I was not happy with the ride. I was also not happy with the fact that it seemed to move around like an old buick over interstate dips etc. Impacts were harsh, yet the damping seemed sloppy. I changed to 18" wheels and tires and that really helped the impact issue but I still had this bobbing around on the interstates. Then I bought a used set of Bilstein Damptronic coil-overs for the car. That really fixed the sloppy damping. The ride was a little firmer but not harsh and the car was fixed for me. i then put on TPC sway bars and it started to really corner well too with very little ride deterioration. Get the "quiet links" if you do this and the suspension will not rattle like a race car. Then last year, I got TPC's "DCS" box. This thing replaces the stock Damptronics "brain" and takes minutes to install. It has a faster processor and better suspension logic. On my car with all the other mods, it didn't really help the ride but it corners ever flatter now. It's still pretty good with impacts with Michelin Pilot Supersports.

Point of all this is that, if I'd bought the DSC before the Damptronics, I might never have bought the Damptronics. I think the stock PASM with DSC would make a pretty nice setup and almost anyone can install a DSC box. It's mounted on the right side under the glove box beneath the outside footwall panel. It snaps into a fastener and lifts out with enough wire so you can unplug it easily. It's one of those automotive clip-lock plugs. You just unplug the black PASM box and plug in the gold DSC box, then bury it back under the panel. Rather than fool with the snap-in thing, I just found a piece of foam and wrapped it around the box and stuffed it in there so it won't rattle. I may go back to PASM when I change to my summer tires again just to see how it works. I remember it being a little bit better on low speed neighborhood bumps than the DSC.

DSC gives not two, but three possible ride settings. I use the softest one for under-50mph surface street driving and use the middle setting for interstates. The middle seeing gives me very good high speed rebound control without being harsh.

I just wish I'd have tried this DSC box with the stock PASM shocks. I've heard from people who have and they seem to be happy with the results.

--------

As far as Gen1 vs Gen2 suspensions, I think the Gen2 cars may have more wheel travel or something else that gives them a more mature ride quality. People on this forum seem to be happy with 19's on Gen2s and I've heard a lot of people complain about the ride with Gen1s and 19's. I wish I could tell you what the differences are, but I really don't know. This is only a very anecdotal impression based on posts I read around the time more people were starting tp post about their Gen2 cars. I've got very little seat time in Gen2 cars. All of that was in the passenger's seats of student's cars at race tracks. That is not a good place to judge ride quality.

:cheers:
 

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i remember one of the guys saying that there were a lot of springs and shocks changes a long the years for both pasm and non-pasm cars.
i never went to check part numbers to confirm that - but anybody with a little time and motivation can do that :)
Basically Porsche made different parts for the following cars:

987.1 PASM
987.1 non-PASM
987.2 PASM
987.2 non-PASM
Boxster Spyder (never checked if Porsche distinguished between MT / PDK)
Cayman R with MT
Cayman R with PDK

but within each category, parts were never modified during the production cycle as far as I know.
 

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Basically Porsche made different parts for the following cars:

987.1 PASM
987.1 non-PASM
987.2 PASM
987.2 non-PASM
Boxster Spyder (never checked if Porsche distinguished between MT / PDK)
Cayman R with MT
Cayman R with PDK

but within each category, parts were never modified during the production cycle as far as I know.
Hah, I misread the OP's name as PASM and somehow got that conflated with the post, sorry about that. I have a 2010 Boxster S with the standard suspension and my personal opinion is that it's too soft. I normally run with stiff-sidewall 18" tires.

Caymans and Boxsters share front springs, but the rear springs are different. Porsche will spec out different rear springs for even slightly different weights (so, the above, with PDK & MT all also having different springs- lot of permutations there). I think Porsche used something like 15 different rear springs on the 987.2 alone. The 987.2 struts are the same, though.
 
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