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So, now you have Numeric shifter cables and soon to be installed Ohlins R&T and RSS LCA's. First, a plan for your installer; ask that the Ohlins be set up with a 30 mm drop to start with 4 mm of preload (2 mm is recommended) . Then if your shop has the ability to corner balance with the necessary weight (your approx weight) applied to the driver seat and the use of adjustable down links for the swaybars. Lowering with Ohlins reduces weight transfer across the car as well as front to back resulting in better turnin, mid corner balance and throttle response. Lowering, Pedro's Techobrace, and a solid thrust puck on your new RSS LCA's all help to prevent fishtailing on threshold braking in the rear and add more accurate turnin.

Ask that your shop give you a slight rake with the front just a little lower than the rear. Not much is needed here to help reduce understeer. I use adjustable sway bars or even better a little wider tire in front to reduce understeer. I have had great sucess with 255/35/18 f and 275/35/18 r with Michelin 4S (daily), Bridgestone RE71R's (track) or Hoosier A7's. I use then all.

Function First make a great motor mount insert (Orange color) to reduce the motor movement. I bought one, my installer showed me the original motor mount that was actually coming apart at 40K (maybe your clunking noise). So, luckily, he sourced a new OEM one within 1 hour delivered and I had my car back in 2 hours with a new OEM motor mount and the Orange insert in place. Now, my car is like a Kart, very little lean in the corners, not much weight transfer in the slalom where the engine weight is noticeable if not controlled. The transmission mounts are another story. I prefer to use the OEM mounts at this point. However I have read that GT3 OEM mounts are very effective and modest NVH. Yes I do have a little wheel hop from standing wheel spin start, but not much NVH from the old OEM set.

Then, have sourced rear toe links if needed to get the correct toe with the dropped suspension, so your car is not in the shop waiting for these parts to be delivered. Request your shop to start with 20mm shims in the LCA's first before they use the OEM camber adjusters front and rear. That way you will increase your track to reduce weight transfer across the car. You can achieve -2.7 f and -2.5 r camber without much inside wear by having the toe alignment set at 0 front and -12 minutes in the rear.

The solid LCA's solid thrust pucks allow even more aggressive toe if wanted as well as caster (8.5-9.0) and wheelbase adjustments. Aggressive toe would be toe out 5 minutes in front. This alignment works well with wider tires to get them to turnin quickly. I have not found any down side even at high speed or lane changes across truck wear tracks in freeway driving with this setup, but know the inside tire shoulder will wear more with this setup and -2.7 camber vs 0 toe.

Great job on suspension selection for a dual purpose car.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
You're going to enjoy the Ohlins, it's a great setup for dual purpose cars! When you're ready for custom valving or to step up to double adjustables let me know
Definitely will do. I was planning on getting them through you but found a deal I couldn't pass up. Thanks for working with me.

So, now you have Numeric shifter cables and soon to be installed Ohlins R&T and RSS LCA's. First, a plan for your installer; ask that the Ohlins be set up with a 30 mm drop to start with 4 mm of preload (2 mm is recommended) . Then if your shop has the ability to corner balance with the necessary weight (your approx weight) applied to the driver seat and the use of adjustable down links for the swaybars. Lowering with Ohlins reduces weight transfer across the car as well as front to back resulting in better turnin, mid corner balance and throttle response. Lowering, Pedro's Techobrace, and a solid thrust puck on your new RSS LCA's all help to prevent fishtailing on threshold braking in the rear and add more accurate turnin.

Ask that your shop give you a slight rake with the front just a little lower than the rear. Not much is needed here to help reduce understeer. I use adjustable sway bars or even better a little wider tire in front to reduce understeer. I have had great sucess with 255/35/18 f and 275/35/18 r either with Michelin 4S (daily) or Bridgestone RE71R's (track). I use both.
Thank you for the suggestions on initial setup. I will definitely pass that on to the shop. Adjustable swaybars and drop links are on the list to get get soon! I saw you suggesting that technobrace when reading some older threads earlier and will look into it too. I've got some PS4S for daily and picked up a second set of stock wheels to eventually put RE71Rs on.

Function First make a great motor mount insert (Orange color) to reduce the motor movement. I bought one, my installer showed me the origninal motor mount that was actually coming apart at 40K (maybe your clunking noise). So, luckily, he sourced a new OEM one within 1 hour delivered and I had my car back in 2 hours with a new OEM motor mount and the Orange insert in place. Now, my car is like a Kart, very little lean in the corners, not much weight tranfer in the slalom where the engine weight is noticeable if not controlled. The tranmission mounts are another story. I prefer to use the OEM mounts at this point. Yes I do have a little wheel hop from standing wheel spin start, but not much NVH.
I think I have read about that insert elsehwere and that looked like a good solution. Glad you agree.

Then, have sourced rear toe links if needed to get the correct toe with the dropped suspension, so your car is not in the shop waiting for these parts to be delivered. Request your shop to start with 20mm shims in the LCA's first before they use the OEM camber adjusters front and rear. That way you will increase your track to reduce weight transfer across the car. You can achieve -2.7 f and -2.5 r camber without much inside wear by having the toe alignment set at 0 front and -12 minutes in the rear.
You think I'll need rear toe links immediately for this setup? I can look into those I hadn't heard that was a requirement to get proper alignment after the coilovers and drop. Is -2.7f and -2.5f what you run? I think I have read a lot of people like to run a .5 difference front to rear. You're also running wider tires up front and adjustable sways which I imagine will affect this a lot. I plan to get there just not right away. I've got the stock tire sizes on the PS4S that came on the car.

The solid LCA's solid thrust pucks allow even more aggressive toe if wanted as well as caster and wheelbase adjustments. Aggressive toe would be toe out 5 minutes in front. This alignment works well with wider tires to get them to turnin quickly. I have not found any down side even at high speed or lane changes across truck wear tracks in freeway driving with this setup, but know the inside tire shoulder will wear more with this setup and -2.7 camber vs 0 toe.

Great job on suspension selection for a dual purpose car.
Makes sense on the toe settings. I'll likely stick to 0 for now but potentially change it down the road.
 

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You may know that there are two stages of lights in the rear. If you pull the light knob all the way out, it turns on a bright red light on the left hand side that is not duplicated on the right side. This light is European by design for foggy weather. Maybe that is what the someone saw. I had a good friend follow me one night to tell me that my taillights were out of balance. I had no idea that I had pulled out the light switch to the second stage that night. It took me a month to figure out what happened.
 
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You may know that there are two stages of lights in the rear. If you pull the light knob all the way out, it turns on a bright red light on the left hand side that is not duplicated on the right side. This light is European by design for foggy weather. Maybe that is what the someone saw. I had a good friend follow me one night to tell me that my taillights were out of balance. I had no idea that I had pulled out the light switch to the second stag that night. It took me a month to figure out what happened.
I'll have to test this, but I did have the knob pulled out so my fog lights would be on while the headlights are on, so that does sound like it would be what I saw!

That's a really odd design, I've never seen that before. Do you know what the reasoning is? Somehow better visibility? Good to know nothing is likely broken, though. I would probably have saved up for those aftermarket 981 look-alikes.

Side note - IPD Competition Plenum removed!

IMG_20190602_184128.jpg
 

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Yep, you can visually see the difference between the left side lens and the right one. Most of the high end Europeaon cars have this lighting feature on their cars, especially the German ones. The car behind you can visually see that single red light for some additional distance, which helps avoid rear end collisions in the fog and hard extreme weather (snow, sleet, heavy rain) a night.
 
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Lots of performance upgrades for a novice driver. I opted for roll bar, race seats, 5pt and head restraint when I was promoted to blue for safety. A stock 987.2 is very capable on the track especially for beginner run groups. Other options installed but not mentioned thus far, maybe I missed it, is a Guard LSD and GT3 MC with the GT3 brake booster (996.355.923.90). Since green run group I've used Sebro slotted rotors, PFC08 (no squeal on the street in contrast to someones post) and Castrol SRF. I don't fuss swapping out pads as the car is used mainly at the track. I also suggest signing signing up for Speed Weekly and invest in ApexPro and GoPro to record/analyze your sessions. My next upgrade is the suspension (MCS), headers and Softronic tune.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Lots of performance upgrades for a novice driver. I opted for roll bar, race seats, 5pt and head restraint when I was promoted to blue for safety. A stock 987.2 is very capable on the track especially for beginner run groups. Other options installed but not mentioned thus far, maybe I missed it, is a Guard LSD and GT3 MC with the GT3 brake booster (996.355.923.90). Since green run group I've used Sebro slotted rotors, PFC08 (no squeal on the street in contrast to someones post) and Castrol SRF. I don't fuss swapping out pads as the car is used mainly at the track. I also suggest signing signing up for Speed Weekly and invest in ApexPro and GoPro to record/analyze your sessions. My next upgrade is the suspension (MCS), headers and Softronic tune.
You're saying I have a lot of performance mods currently? Not the case, I'm mostly compiling a list of potentially worthwhile things to install over time. Currently, it's just LCAs and Ohlins. I didn't plan to do coilovers so quickly but want to get proper alignment and the LCAs can't be installed with stock height suspension. No use wasting money on springs on a car with probably worn dampers, either, I'd rather just do it once.

On the short(ish) list:
Brake pads (maybe rotors), fluid, ducts
3rd radiator

I should update my list sometime soon.

I've read some good things about getting an LSD installed. GT3 MC is on the list also. Thanks for your suggestion on brakes. As far as datalogging goes, I was recently looking at the AiM SOlO DL so I can read data out of CAN bus (like oil temp, real coolant temp, etc). I'd be interested to hear what people have and their opinions.

Where I'm at in the Sacramento area we just went from a record amount of rain to a couple degrees under triple digits... high track temps are here.
 

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I realize you're thinking ahead with staged investments. Just making a point about adding proper restraints to your list, that's all. The advice received thus far has been excellent and from drivers with far more experience than me. Here is a good thread to get you started on the data acquisition https://caymanregister.org/showthread.php?t=35368

As much as I would like to get a Vbox or Aim I've prioritized the suspension work.
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
I realize you're thinking ahead with staged investments. Just making a point about adding proper restraints to your list, that's all. The advice received thus far has been excellent and from drivers with far more experience than me. Here is a good thread to get you started on the data acquisition https://caymanregister.org/showthread.php?t=35368

As much as I would like to get a Vbox or Aim I've prioritized the suspension work.

Haha don't worry, that list is very limited by my budget. I'm 25 and recently purchased my first house, in California no less. I don't have much extra budget for these things currently, couldn't upgrade everything even if I wanted to!

Thanks for the link! I still need to register for PCA.
 

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Well your personal info says a lot about you! 25 and owning a California house, thats quite a budget you got going. I will be respectful of that in the future, which puts the Ohlins and RSS LCA's into a whole new catigory. I took 2 years of ownership to get my set of Ohlins installed. Then another 9 months of tire shoulder wear to get some Tarett Cup LCA's installed along with Tarett's GT swaybars and downlinks. Now, after digesting all of the suspension components into a smooth driving track machine, that's easily converted to the street, I feel this journey was worth it. My wife still complains about the bumpy ride, usually do to the compression/rebound adjustment "not" set to daily mode (12 clicks from full stiff). Track is now 5 clicks f and 7 clicks r. Just my preference of a wider front tire and a stiffer rebound/compression setting in front. The rear end seems planted (roll rate balance f to r) with the 2 click's softer.

The sway bars now at the third hole f (out of 5) and 2nd hole (from soft) in the rear for an overall (moderate rate) which takes away the inherent understeer. These setting are just a little stiffer than your OEM sway bars. I have tried very stiff f and r swaybar setting, but just made the car slide around more, eventhough it was flatter in the corners. The swaybar setting affect the spring rate by adding to it the twist effect, like a torson bar. So, just know that when you are ready to add the adjustable swaybars to your suspension, you will be adding more spring rate to the 400 lbs/in f and 458 lbs/in rate in the rear springs on the Ohlins. This is well below those track guys that use 550 lbs/in in front and 700 lbs/in in the rear mounted on their dual adjustable JRZ's with remote cannisters along with monster sway bars and say they have no problems on bumpy back country roads. I want a dual purpose car for 80% daily drivability over the concrete expansion joints, railroad tracks and other road uneven surfaces that would upset these tightly controlled track setups.

The drop of the car is about 36mm due to the corner balance and rake alignment requirements, just for reference. I rub my front wind defectors and sometimes my GT2 brake ducts on driveway ramps and speed bumps. But they are complable/replaceable, so no worries.
 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
Well your personal info says a lot about you! 25 and owning a California house, thats quite a budget you got going. After digesting all of the suspension components into a smooth driving track machine, that's easily converted to the street, I feel this journey was worth it. My wife still complains about the bumpy ride, usually do to the compression/rebound adjustment "not" set to daily mode (12 clicks from full stiff). Track is now 5 clicks f and 7 clicks r. Just my preference of a wider front tire and a stiffer rebound/compression setting in front. The rear end seems planted (roll rate balance f to r) with the 2 click's softer.
Yes sir, it's a tight budget but I make it work. I have a decent amount of DIY mechanical experience so I'll be installing these coilovers and LCAs myself here soon. The weather decided it doesn't want to cooperate, though, because it's supposed to be 101-103 the next couple days and mid 90s the whole rest of the 10 day forecast... I'll have to take it slow. I've been doing some reading on the install process and it looks pretty tedious, though pretty similar in nature to the Focus ST I owned. The car will be down for a little while!

Based on everything I've seen you post it certainly seems like your car is configured very well and is a good one to emulate. I have never owned an adjustable coilover setup like this so I will need to do some reading on compression and rebound adjustments.

The sway bars now at the third hole f (out of 5) and 2nd hole (from soft) in the rear for an overall (moderate rate) which takes away the inherent understeer. These setting are just a little stiffer than your OEM sway bars. I want a dual purpose car for 80% daily drivability over the concrete expansion joints, railroad tracks and other road uneven surfaces that would upset these tightly controlled track setups.
I am in the same camp as far as usage for the car. Good to know about your swaybar setup and dialing out that understeer. I did some hard mountain driving this weekend up and over the Sonora pass and learned a lot more about the character of the car. I definitely found that understeer and the fade point for the stock pads (come to think of it though, I have no idea what pads are in there). I will say though, that even as stock and worn as this car is, it does handle and grip fantastically, and the power of the brakes surprised me. It's so balanced and it loves to go fast!

The drop of the car is about 36mm due to the corner balance and rake alignment requirements, just for reference. I rub my front wind defectors and sometimes my GT2 brake ducts on driveway ramps and speed bumps. But they are complable/replaceable, so no worries.
The wind deflectors being these guys? https://www.suncoastparts.com/product/987C2LIP.html

I'll have to see how far I want to lower it. I'd like to retain some usability so it sounds like 36mm would definitely be at the edge of that. Luckily my driveway is very flat but I do plan on driving the car on trips and such where I'm sure I'll run into not so favorable road heights.

By the way - If anyone has run across good guides or information regarding the coilover install process on a 987 please post some links. Best I've found is this one on a 981 but I'm sure the process is pretty similar. Also, I just took a look on Ohlins website and I see they've got instructions for a POS MR80 kit (labeled "Porsche 986 and 987 Boxster/Cayman") and POZ MR80 kit (labeled "Porsche 987 Boxster/Cayman Front"). The part number on my box says POS MR80 but now I'm not sure if that's correct, I guess I need to call them.
 

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One corner out! Fronts are pretty easy. I read the rear is a little more challenging due to the axles.
The rear is more complicated due to the abundance of trim to be removed -- hopefully without breaking or losing any bits in the process. Good luck with the remainder of the installation!

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Discussion Starter #36
The rear is more complicated due to the abundance of trim to be removed -- hopefully without breaking or losing any bits in the process. Good luck with the remainder of the installation!
Ah, right. I'll break out my trim tools. Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I found that my passenger side strut bearing was a little crunchy like it had some dirt in it. Rather than trying to clean and re-grease I just decided to order a new set. $40 each (part number 99634351505) isn't too bad for peace of mind. Never noticed any noises coming from it like I've read in a few threads but if I can avoid pulling that apart again I will! I just remembered to get my GT3 ducts ordered too.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Finally making some progress! Ohlins coilovers, RSS front LCAs, GT3 brake ducts, and some NHP/Maxspeed competition headers have been installed (I couldn't help myself when I was offered a set at a great price).

On the short list is the alignment and transmission fluid change.


The drop of the car is about 36mm due to the corner balance and rake alignment requirements, just for reference. I rub my front wind defectors and sometimes my GT2 brake ducts on driveway ramps and speed bumps. But they are complable/replaceable, so no worries.
This is my first time owning a car with coilovers and suspension this adjustable. I now have some questions regarding the alignment, coilovers in general, and the suggestions you gave.

I did my best to install them per Ohlins directions and measurements for now, which they say drops the car ~20mm. At the moment I am measuring a ~25mm drop all around. Do I need to give the coilovers time and mileage to "settle"? It's a common thing I've read about when installing coilovers or springs. Problem being, my front toe is way off due to the LCAs, making the car basically undrivable.

Do I tow it to the shop, have them do an alignment, then drive for a week or so, let it settle, then do another alignment and readjust the height?

Will height changes screw with the alignment much? For example, if I decide to drop it, later on, another 5mm like you suggested, and do a corner balance, do I need another alignment after that?

After re-reading your post I realize you say to set 4mm of preload, I set 2mm. What's your reasoning for that?

I'll need to read up more and decide on the actual alignment specs I want. I often read people run a 0.5 difference in camber F to R, however, I know you haven't stuck to that. You do have wider tires and swaybars, etc, though, so I do wonder if that 0.5 difference is more ideal for a "more stock" setup like mine. Also, I don't yet have adjustable toe links for the rear, so I may just have to ask them to get as much as they can and we'll see where that puts us.
 

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Hyrax, you are going down the slippery slope now. preloading the Ohlins help in compression then droop phase, where the car's front wheels are unweighted. The preload will prevent the springs from becoming slack on the droop phase. It sort of takes the place of helper springs on other setups. My shop did this to their Ohlin installations. It does take away about 2 mm of threads on the outside of the shock body. Even with that 4 mm of preload, down the road about 3 years, the springs settle and I can still rotate my f springs when I change my tires after an event. This is a good thing as you will need as much spring travel in front to absorb the bumps in the daily drive mode.

The camber difference between f and r is different on my car due to using 255/35/18 f, so I can use a little more negative camber in the rear past the magic -.5 camber number difference. I find that running with this setup allows a little more throttle induced rotation mid corner, which allows for 4 wheel drifting in some corners with full power down. That is 295+ power, which is not enough to break lose the 275/35/18's RE71R's on the rear. I suspect that if I had the clearance under my skid plate to use 285/30/18 RE71R's, I would be asking for the same or even more camber in the rear than the front as Lovetoturn does with his 981 using that combo. I am currently using -2.7f and-2.5r camber. Car balance is very important to me, that is why I have this setup with my S motor torque curve. More power would require a bigger tire in the rear or a LSD, but so far the RE71R's are well balanced. I will soon see how the car reacts to new Hoosier A-7's being used at the next track event in a couple of weeks. They are the same size as my other tires.

Another way of looking at this setup is the actual front and rear outside tire shoulder roll. On RE71R's there are small triangles located high on the sidewall of the tire shoulder near the cap that you can use a measurement tools. I use these a guidelines for tire pressures and you would be surprised on how low you can go with RE71R's and still have great control of mid corner traction without pulling the tires off the rims, like 25 lbs and still does not hit the triangles. This use is for a wet cold track. I would certainly not recommend running lower pressures to anyone using Michelin P4S's or even Pilot sport cup 2 tires. They have too soft of side walls for this application.

Your home wrenching does present some alignment issues. Some guys actually have great success with string to get close to 0 toe in front. Rear is going to be a problem without adjustable toe links. Simply not enough adjustment available using the OEM adjuster to get the correct toe in with a dropped Ohlin car. Especially if you have had it corner balanced, which I highly recommend so that your turnin cross weight shift is the same both directions (add the front right weight to the left rear and match it to the left front to the right rear). Your shop will try to get these percent numbers to be as close as possible. This is where the benefit of changing the ride height on each corner really comes in handy. Some cars are nearly perfect, while others not so much.

Your springs will settle and change the calculations over a month or so. I did not have that time line to play with so they installed the Ohlins and did the corner balance. I also did not have the adjustable rear toe links to complete the job in the first place which left me with -2.2 rear camber. So 6 months later, I had the shop do the job correctly with the adj toe links, which included a hammer to the right rear sub frame perch, which was installed incorrectly at the factory. The hammer and the adjustable toe links did their work, allowing the 12 minutes of toe in in the rear with -2.5 camber. I also had the shop do a bumpsteer adjustment on all 4 corners. I was not present when they did this so not sure how accurate their method was, but just looking at the washers above and below the outer ball joint of the rear toe link, I can see they are different.

Changing the ride height does change the camber. Also you might want to address the rake angle of your car to assure you do have a little rake front to back. Not too much. I like my car setup to almost 0 rake. Since I do not have a LSD, I need a little more rear weight over the tires. The trade off is threshold braking becoming less stable from rear wobble if done with too much rake and understeer if not enough rake.

Good suspension work is like an artist and his painting where small details all add up to a great result.
 
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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
Hyrax, you are going down the slipperly slope now. preloading the Ohlins help in compression then droop phase, where the car's front wheels are unweighted. The preload will prevent the springs from becoming slack on the droop phase. It sort of takes the place of helper springs on other setups. My shop did this to their Ohlin installations. It does take away about 2 mm of threads on the outside of the shock body. Even with that 4 mm of preload, down the raod about 3 years, I can still rotate the front springs when I change my tires after an event.
Oh I know it, haha. I understand what the preload is for, I'm more wondering what actual benefit you get from 4mm vs 2mm. If 2mm prevents the slack then why do 4mm.

The camber difference between f and r is different on my car due to using 255/35/18 f, so I can use a little more negative camber in the rear past the magic -.5 camber number difference. I find that running with this setup allows a little more throttle induced rotation mid corner, which allows for 4 wheel drifting in some corners with full power down. That is 295+ power, which is not enough to break lose the 275/35/18's RE71R's on the rear. I suspect that if I had the clearance under my skid plate to use 285/30/18 RE71R's, I would be asking for the same or even more camber in the rear than the front as Lovetoturn does with his 981 using that combo. I am currently useing -2.7f and-2.5r camber. Car balance is very important to me, that is why I have this setup with my S motor torque curve. More power would require a bigger tire in the rear or a LSD, but so far the RE71R's are well balanced. I will soon see how the car reacts to new Hoosier A-7's being used at the next track event in a couple of weeks. They are the same dementions as my other tires.
It definitely sounds like you have it setup very well. The difference in camber makes sense with your configuration as I suspected. I'll just have to get mine done as best I can with the parts I have installed now. The mods and changes will continue down the road. Like you said, slippery slope haha.

Your home wrenching does present some alignment issues. Some guys actually have great sucess with string to get close to 0 toe in front. Rear is going to be a problem without adjustable toe links. Simply not enough adjustment available using the OEM adjuster to get the correct toe in with a dropped Ohlin car. Especially if you have had it corner balanced, which I highly recommend so that your turnin cross weight shift is the same both directions (add the front right weight to the left rear and match it to the left front to the right rear). Your shop will try to get these precent numbers to be as close as possible. This is where the benefit of changing the ride height on each corner really comes in handy. Some cars are nearly perfect, while others not so much.
I did try to get the outer tie rod loose to so a rough adjustment myself but didn't have any luck (though I was tired and didn't try too hard). I've had good luck with using AAA for situations like this. Getting my money's worth!

So you think I won't be able to get the rear toe right with the car lowered on the Ohlins and setup for say, -2.2R camber? Is it the lowering that causes the inability to adjust it enough?

Your spings will settle and change the calculations over a month or so. I did not have that time line to play with so they installed the Ohlins and did the corner balance. I also did not have the adjustable rear toe links to complete the job in the first place which left me with -2.2 rear camber. So 6 months later, I had the shop do the job correctly with the adj toe links, which included a hammer to the right rear sub frame perch, which was installed incorrectly at the factory. The hammer and the adjustable toe links did their work, allowing the 12 minutes of toe in in the rear with -2.5 camber. I also had the shop do a bumpsteer adjustment on all 4 corners. I was not present when they did this so not sure how accurate their method was, but just looking at the washers above and below the outer ball joint of the rear toe link, I can see they are different.
Seems like based on this I might be able to get -2.7F and -2.2R camber with proper rear toe. I'd be happy with that for now.

Corner balance is definitely something I want to do. Did you not have to re-balance once things settled down, though? And wouldn't that throw off the alignment a bit once it settles?

Changing the ride height does change the camber. Also you might want to address the rake angle of your car to assure you do have a little rake front to back. Not too much. I like my car setup to almost 0 rake. Since I do not have a LSD, I need a little more rear weight over the tires. The trade off is threshold braking becoming less stable from rear wobble if gone too much rake and understeer if not enough rake.
About how much rake would you suggest?

Also, now that I have the adjustable caster pucks, do you have a suggestion for that spec as well? Some people say max it out, others say don't...


Edit: and side note, my damn roof liner is falling off now ? I guess I need to look into reupholstering that.
 
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