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Starts in Great Britain, Stops All Over The World
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, We have a limited edition (EBC Brakes RP-X) silver magnetic dish tray for keeping your bolts, washers or tools in one place at those crucial moments.

One randomly selected forum member can own this just by commenting below with the strangest food they have ever eaten, maybe snails, frogs legs, alligator..... As always, if a picture is available why not post it alongside your comment!

There is a tedious link to this thread as food is often served on silver trays :ROFLMAO:

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A Free Gift from EBC BRakl
 

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I can't exactly claim it as strange to me, since down here on the gulf coast, "mudbugs" or "crawdads" can be a staple during Feb-May. :)

However, much of the USA would cringe if you dropped a platter of em on the table and announced Dinner IS Served.


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So for reasons that I can only guess at, whenever I tell Americans that I’ve eaten beaver, there are laughs all around. Beaver is a dark meat that is a bit “gamey”. Again, more laughs.
I grew up in a very rural part of Canada and we had “wild game” events where people would cook and offer up the stuff they’d killed that year. Bear, raccoon, various fowl, etc. If people hunt it in Canada or kill it out of spite, I’ve probably eaten it.
The “meat that got away” for me was fermented shark in Iceland. The shark is deadly if eaten fresh, so the Icelanders bury it in the ground until it starts to rot and then dig it up and eat it. They have a nice strong alcoholic beverage to make the whole ordeal even more interesting. Sadly I was not able to indulge in this while I was there despite my best efforts.
 

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Escargot, kangaroo, most game meats, nothing I wouldn’t consider to be too out there lol


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Similar for me. The most adventurous I have done is escargot, kangaroo, emu, snake and frog legs that I can recall other than Bison which isnt really that exotic. There is a place in Erlangen Germany that has the best escargot, but its also floating in bacon/grease and served on garlic toast which will make anything good! The kangaroo was served with a type of sweet jelly if I recall, and has to be served quite rare as it is very lean and will turn to rubber if overcooked.
 

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Starts in Great Britain, Stops All Over The World
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I can't exactly claim it as strange to me, since down here on the gulf coast, "mudbugs" or "crawdads" can be a staple during Feb-May. :)

However, much of the USA would cringe if you dropped a platter of em on the table and announced Dinner IS Served.


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I’d give it a go!
 

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Starts in Great Britain, Stops All Over The World
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So for reasons that I can only guess at, whenever I tell Americans that I’ve eaten beaver, there are laughs all around. Beaver is a dark meat that is a bit “gamey”. Again, more laughs.
I grew up in a very rural part of Canada and we had “wild game” events where people would cook and offer up the stuff they’d killed that year. Bear, raccoon, various fowl, etc. If people hunt it in Canada or kill it out of spite, I’ve probably eaten it.
The “meat that got away” for me was fermented shark in Iceland. The shark is deadly if eaten fresh, so the Icelanders bury it in the ground until it starts to rot and then dig it up and eat it. They have a nice strong alcoholic beverage to make the whole ordeal even more interesting. Sadly I was not able to indulge in this while I was there despite my best efforts.
Beaver!! 😂
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So for reasons that I can only guess at, whenever I tell Americans that I’ve eaten beaver, there are laughs all around. Beaver is a dark meat that is a bit “gamey”. Again, more laughs.
I grew up in a very rural part of Canada and we had “wild game” events where people would cook and offer up the stuff they’d killed that year. Bear, raccoon, various fowl, etc. If people hunt it in Canada or kill it out of spite, I’ve probably eaten it.
The “meat that got away” for me was fermented shark in Iceland. The shark is deadly if eaten fresh, so the Icelanders bury it in the ground until it starts to rot and then dig it up and eat it. They have a nice strong alcoholic beverage to make the whole ordeal even more interesting. Sadly I was not able to indulge in this while I was there despite my best efforts.
PM me your name and address, the tray is yours
 

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I've eaten lots of offal over the years either at Taiwanese, French or British restaurants but probably the most unusual was a calf brain dish at one of Chris Cosentino's restaurants in San Francisco. It was part of a head to tail experience. Maybe cows brain itself isn't necessarily that odd, as we get them in bologna hotdogs, etc. However, this stood out to me because it was actually our dessert. The brains were incorporated with apples and cinnamon into some sort of Apple crumble. I remember it was tasty. Much as you would expect from an apple crumble though perhaps a bit meatier :)
 

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I'm from South Louisiana, USA...so not much puts me off other than possum. I've had fried raccoon, frog, alligator, rattle snake, crawl fish, bison, elk, white tail deer, fallow, sheep, etc.... but to me the strangest food that I've tried has to be raw horse. Had it in Japan, which seems to serve a fair amount of horse, from a popular conveyor beltconveyor belt sushi chain "Genki Sushi," in a variety of ways as my wife and I saw it available at a number of different establishments before trying it out. Almost taste like beef...who knew.
 

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Are you ready for this? Sweetbread is a culinary name for the thymus or pancreas, typically from calf and lamb. The "heart" sweetbreads are more spherical in shape, while the "throat" sweetbreads are more cylindrical in shape. As the thymus is replaced by fibrous tissue in older animals, only pancreatic sweetbreads come from beef and pork. I first ate sweetbreads when I was a young man just out of high school while working in a beef packing plant. My favorite way to fix them is simply breading them and deep fat frying them. Thank you!
 
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