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Discussion Starter #1
For those of you with nitrogen-filled tires, how do you cap off if a few PSI are needed? It's getting colder and according to TPMS a wee bit extra is in order.

I have a compressor and a high-pressure bike pump, but those won't add nitrogen (unless there's a modification I have not heard about). Going to the dealer is, I guess an option... 50 miles R/T for a little air and those won't be cold inflation pressures by then anyway.

I thought about asking the gas place where I get CO2 for the keggerator if he can supply a tank of nitrogen.

Alternatively, just use regular air and not worry about it.
 

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+1. Nitrogen is easy money for the shops.

Your only choice is to buy a nitrogen tank, go to the shop for a top off, or use air.
 

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I agree - just use regular air. However, if you think it matters, Costco was using nitrogen in their tire shop and willing to top off free. I think that numerous studies have shown that there is no difference in a passenger tire, from Edmunds:

The air we breathe is made up of 78 percent nitrogen, 21 percent oxygen and a few other elements. To get the desired benefits for tires, nitrogen needs to be at least 93 percent pure, according to nitrogen service equipment providers quoted on Tirerack.com. So we're basically talking about adding an extra 15 percent of nitrogen and getting rid of as much oxygen as possible.
Based on cost, convenience and actual performance benefit, we don't think nitrogen is worth it. A much better use of your money would be to buy a good tire-pressure gauge and check your tires frequently. This is a good idea even if you have a tire-pressure monitoring system in your vehicle. The warning lights aren't required to come on until you have less than 25 percent of the recommended tire pressure. Having the correct tire pressure will get you many of the benefits of using nitrogen and will ensure that your tires last longer.




For those of you with nitrogen-filled tires, how do you cap off if a few PSI are needed? It's getting colder and according to TPMS a wee bit extra is in order.

I have a compressor and a high-pressure bike pump, but those won't add nitrogen (unless there's a modification I have not heard about). Going to the dealer is, I guess an option... 50 miles R/T for a little air and those won't be cold inflation pressures by then anyway.

I thought about asking the gas place where I get CO2 for the keggerator if he can supply a tank of nitrogen.

Alternatively, just use regular air and not worry about it.
 

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. . .. Alternatively, just use regular air and not worry about it.
Unless you can articulate a compelling reason for using Nitrogen, +1 to your "Alternatively, just use regular . . . ." - as dry as possible.
Of course, you'll have to turn those green valve stem caps back in to the dealer - maybe they'll refund some of the Nitrogen fill money? :)
 

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My compressor uses filtering equipment to pull the H2O out to allow bead blasting , paint guns, and tires. I have also used nitrogen in tires and the difference is minimal...maybe 1 lb difference in heat related expansion. My nitrogen is used mostly for shock remote units...in tires dry air works just as good. A small to medium nitrogen bottle is good at the track if you don't trailer a compressor & generator both for tires and air tools. Use a guard on the valve so if it does get knocked off it dosn't go shooting around the garage ala dumb bomb.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
regular air is 80percent nitrogen and 20 percent oxygen.. is the 20 percent that goes through the tire pores ...
Sounds like a self-correcting problem, non-nitrogen leaving the premises anyway.

My compressor uses filtering equipment to pull the H2O out to allow bead blasting
Good point, my compressor is hidden in the basement and I forget there an inline filter... a feature the bicycle pump does not have. Pretty sure I added a water drain to the piping leading to the garage, which likely needs checking.
 

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A few years back I tried to keep everything using pure Nitrogen and eventually figured out it was a pain in that a) it did not really seem to make all that much difference in any tire performance and b) I kept facing the problem you bring up which is where to get Nitrogen when the tires were low. When I first bought my Lexus they were using Nitrogen but that only lasted for about a year with them as they finally decided it wasn't worth the hassle. Thus, my suggestion for what it is worth is to add the air (normal) and give up on the Nitrogen.
 

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Buy a 3-5 gallon portable tank and have your dealer, shop fill it up for free next time you're in their neighborhood. Either that or add a desicant filter, moisture remover, to your air compressor to dry the air.
 

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Here is what Michelin said (same differences)


How To Check Your Tire Pressure | Michelin Tires
[h=4]"Nitrogen Versus Compressed Air[/h]Most tires are filled with compressed air. But some tire retailers have started to put nitrogen into their customers’ tires. (Nitrogen is simply dry air with the oxygen removed. Air contains nearly 79% nitrogen already.) Because nitrogen replaces oxygen, less air can escape your tires, and your inflation pressure stays higher longer. Unfortunately, there are other possible sources of leaks (tire/rim interface, valve, valve/rim interface and the wheel) which prevent the guarantee of pressure maintenance for individuals using air or nitrogen inflation.

Nitrogen and compressed air CAN be mixed, if needed. Tires manufactured by Michelin are designed to deliver their expected performance when inflated with air or nitrogen, as long as the user respects the pressures recommended by the vehicle manufacturer on the vehicle’s placard or by the tire manufacturer."

 

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I agree that this is a big pain in the rear. The hassle every time you want to change pressure far outweighs just using my home compressor that I also bought to blow out my sprinkler lines every year before the winter. Agreed, spend the money on a tinge gauge.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Agreed, spend the money on a tinge gauge.
I just did a search on Tinge Gauge... not found? Simple typo (if so, OK)? I do have a gauge (dial, with hose and bleed-off) but it's 40 years old from my auto-x days.
 

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AFA using pure Nitrogen, think about it - when your tire is being mounted its entire volume is already filled tire plain-old air. So once sealed and filled to normal pressure, it is already polluted.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I do have a gauge (dial, with hose and bleed-off) but it's 40 years old from my auto-x days.
...and a more fundamental problem. The only one Craftman item I own that hadn't broken yet*, was the rolling tool chest -- now the base's drawer interlock feature malfunctioned and I cannot get at anything including the tire gauge. So, while I decide on saw/torch/explosives to get it cracked open, i ordered a digital tire gauge from Amazon Prime, so in 2 days I can change the pressure (or could I just leave the key in the ignition, display on TPMS and simply pump until I get the reading I want?)

*edit -- the compressor hasn't died yet, just all the power tools.
 

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My wife's Mercedes came with nitrogen. The dealer didn't charge me for it. I don't pay any attention to it. I just use regular compressed air to top off.
 

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Here is what Michelin said (same differences):


"Because nitrogen replaces oxygen, less air can escape your tires, and your inflation pressure stays higher longer."
I was having trouble parsing that at first, but it seems as though they're saying that air can permeate through the tire more readily than pure nitrogen.

In which case, I call Bullshit.
 

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Well, that part is actually true. The extra oxygen does permeate through tires faster. Co2 is even faster. If you've ever inflated a bike tire with c02, you'd see the difference. But o2 is a small percentage of regular air.


I was having trouble parsing that at first, but it seems as though they're saying that air can permeate through the tire more readily than pure nitrogen.

In which case, I call Bullshit.
 
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