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I'm contemplating installing aftermarket HID's in my 981 Cayman. I also been reading various websites about what can happen if you are unlucky enough to have an accident with these installed. In Great Britain and Ireland if you have aftermarket HID's the insurance will every time deny a claim. That means you and your estate will pay for everything yourself out of pocket. Repair both cars, injuries and legal settlement. Here in America will a lawyer go after you for these HID's claiming their client was blinded/dazzled by your lights (assuming it was the type of accident where they could be blinded). Does insurance or police routinely check for aftermarket HID's at accident scene's (where the accident is severe or a death happened) and will your insurance deny (no matter what type of accident it was daytime or nighttime blinded or not) a claim upon inspection of your vehicle? No claim means you and your estate will be liable to pay for all damages incurred in an accident. Louisiana just passed a law banning aftermarket After-market bright headlights now against the law - KNOE 8 News; KNOE-TV; KNOE.com |. All aftermarket HID's are illegal according to NHTSA. A brief synopsis of OEM requirements for HID's are if they are 35w they must have headlight levelers and washers. The Cayman S has headlight levelers but no washers. I don't know if they are the same bulbs as are in the PDLS system which are 35w bulbs. Some HID light are very dazzling and some are not to me while driving. I can't imagine how dazzling even the OEM factory HID's will be once the lenses start to turn yellow and hazy. Did auto manufacturers make any changes to the headlight lenses to prevent yellowing with HID's. They could easily. Ever notice how some cars have a hazy yellow headlight lens but the parking lights and turn signal lenses are still clear. Why can't they make a headlight lens that won't turn yellow like the turn signal lenses. What does everyone think about this and is it something that would make someone not install aftermarket HID's on any brand of vehicle?
 

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Some HID light are very dazzling and some are not to me while driving.
Answer this one:

How many of those have aftermarket HID kits put into non HID enclosures and how many are OEM?


Thats what you are contemplating to do; isn't it?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Answer this one:

How many of those have aftermarket HID kits put into non HID enclosures and how many are OEM?


Thats what you are contemplating to do; isn't it?
Thats what you are contemplating to do; isn't it?
What part of I'm contemplating installing aftermarket HID's in my 981 Cayman Don't you understand?
Can't you be a little nicer in your reply's.
 

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Why would you install a lighting system that could blind oncoming drivers and cause an accident? I don't get it.
 

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Getcayman

I'm not sure what you are trying to do but maybe I can explain this.

You can take it to the bank that everything delivered by Porsche is 100% compliant with DOT (NHTSA). Otherwise they could not sell the car of they would be liable for very heavy penalties (not the itty bitty CAFE fines but serious civil fines).

States can pass whatever laws they want. They can make them civil or criminal laws as long as they fall within the federal statutes. IANAL but, basically, this means they can make it tougher than federal statutes.

I believe a company can sell whatever it wants with the caveat "for off road use only", otherwise they would be subject to the same steep fines as the car importer (and some do get fined).

So to answer your question, you said that all aftermarket HIDs are illegal per the NHTSA (i.e., DOT). Read Daniel Stern, who is highly regarded in the lighting industry for years. Follow his links Daniel Stern Lighting Consultancy and Supply tl;dr Don't do it.

So, setting the legal issues aside, meaning someone else could sue you or the state (doubtful the feds as you are small potatoes), the issue becomes what is your insurance company going to do?

So ask yourself, if you ran an insurance company and your subscriber used clearly illegal equipment, are you required to pay of the claim? Read your policy. My guess is NO. You just became self-insured. I think the mere fact you are asking about this means you already knew this.

Now somebody is bound to say "but you will never get caught". If you were in an accident, and during the investigation they found this, I doubt it would matter one wit if the lights caused the accident but I don't know.

Good luck.
 

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There are risks worth taking because the potential reward outweighs the potential consequences. Perhaps getting marginally better headlight functionality (Stern argues it's illusionary) at the risk of pissing off nearly every driver coming at you in the opposite direction at night, AND setting yourself up for insurance claims issues isn't a risk/reward scenario that looks very appealing. I suggest that in the event of an accident, having non-NHTSA compliant headlights could also result in civil - and possibly criminal - legal repercussions.
 

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I installed aftermarket HID's on a 2003 Passat, which had 9004 Halogens in the USA. This is not to be construed as advice, but rather my experience based on 10-year-old technology, and may not be applicable today.
first, will the aftermarket lamps fit the available space? Is the electronics package compactly part of the lamp housing or does it require a separate mounting space. If your system requires relays (HID's inrush current can blow a fuse) you need to mount those as well. Also, the wiring loom will require a lot of cutting and splicing, and color codes will not likely match.
your car's electronics may note the different current draw of an HID and/or relay compared to the OEM setup, and record a fault; no clue what the car will do about that possible fault condition.
aftermarket HID's were (may still be) available at various color temperatures; I chose 4300K for the optimum lumens/watt and a good choice of color temperature of the light. the extremely blue, and also fairly *dim* HID's that one sees on the road are usually 10000K bulbs, which are just plain stupid.
My conversion required dremel work on the lamp housing, some surgery on the rubber boots which provided a water-resistant seal on the rear of the housing, as well as the wiring and relay work. Not brain surgery, but not trivial.
The results were, drum roll, excellent. The xenon capsules were mounted in remanufactured 9004 housings, and the optical center of the system remained unchanged. I had the same 9004 beam pattern as before, but with more total light and a better color of light. I don't know why Stern did not find this to be true; ask him. Because my Passat was never heavily loaded, i never had a problem with my headlights illuminating the treetops (and, anyway, the headlamp aim was adjustable if you knew which underhood screw to turn).
it is a violation of USA federal law to import and/or sell a vehicle that does not comply with DOT/EPA requirements; it is not a violation of federal law to drive one: witness all the pickup trucks on 60 inch tires and ask yourself whether the bumpers meet regulations. have you ever seen a federal DOT cop running equipment violation road checks? No, neither have I.
it is a violation of any US state vehicle code - that is, an inspection violation/equipment citation - to operate a vehicle that does not meet state code - codes do vary by state. In the paleolithic era, H4 headlamps were a violation of NJ sealed-beam requirements (because, incidentally, General Electric owned the patents on sealed beam headlights!!) and I had often failed my state inspection because of them. I generally went back to a different inspection station a day later and passed with no changes.
there is nothing to prevent somebody for suing you for anything if there is an accident. if you hit me, and i thought your tight underwear were a contributing factor in the collision, i might sue you, whether or not i prevailed. insurance companies may well seek to avoid settlement payouts and find a reason to worm out. good luck suing your insurer for not insuring you if your policy prohibits something arcane. (e.g., does the no-racing clause mean that passing another vehicle on the highway gives the insurer an "out"?)
yellowed, foggy, scratched headlamp lenses are a reflection on manufacturers using low quality lens plastics, or rarely on cars which have been driven in simooms.
 
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