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stopped by my friendlly NAPA dealer and ask if they could get me a air filter for my 06 CS. they said sure $29. Thought that was cheap, so I ordered it. It came in today and it was totally wrong, it was retangular in design, not anything like the factory CS filter, just a flat filter about 14' inches by 10 inches give or take. They checked and rechecked and said this is the only air filter they show for the CS.

Am I missing something here or what. Of have they just screwed up badly saying this filter fits the 06 and up CS. My advantage auto dealer quoted me a price on the K&N filter for $55, but they did not have one to view either, so I am wondering also if it is a flat type filter unlike the oval open center CS filter.

Proabably best to go back to my Porsche dealer and bend over and buy it there-huh.
 

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I'd recommend checking prices at Suncoast Porsche (a site sponsor), or you might also check Pelican Parts (they carry multiple alternatives).
 

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Another option is Automotion if you're looking at K&N or similar. Not sure if they're still a site sponsor or not.
 

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They probably sold you a cabin air filter not the engine air filter. Suncoast is easiest for me. I am by a computer all day long.
 

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My local Advance Auto Parts lists one for the Cayman S, not any cheaper than those I ordered online, about $11. I'd check with Advance or Autozone.
 

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Like others say... plenty of sponsor on this board. There is also Pelican Parts - not a sponsor here, but if you have a part number, chances are they'll have the part.
 

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I've used Pelican, have an order pending with them right now, but he asked about a local supply, thought I'd pass my experiences along.
 

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the K&N I installed was oval like the OEM part... Why put back an OEM filter for $29 when you can get the K&N for $55? - first "mod" I did
 

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Because K&N doesn't actually filter out all the stuff you want to keep out ofyour engine. I used to use K&N but decided after reading several tests that it was not the bargain it claims. Add in the price of their oil and cleaner and it becomes less of one. Paper element isn't that expensive nor does it have to be changed that often, so I've run paper elements for several years now in all my cars. Used to have cone filters also, people think they give more performance because of the sound, but they don't. If you like the sound, just take out the element and you'll get plenty of sound.
 

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Why put back an OEM filter for $29 when you can get the K&N for $55? - first "mod" I did
The OEM paper filters on many cars have been proven to provide better performance and filtration than many aftermarket filters. Oiled filters have long been a topic of discussion as to the potential damage the oil can do to a mass air flow (MAF) sensor, which if you look at it carefully with all of the facts is a real possibility.
 

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so you're saying K&N is "snake oil" then, right?

As for "oiled filter elements", I agree... if you overload the element w/ oil you'll end up w/ MAF etc problems.
 

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There are still two camps regarding K&N and similar filters (maybe three? Yes, no and maybe?). I've had K&N and another brand that escapes me right now, but I've seen reports of tests and they use filter material with much larger pores than the standard paper element, which of course let in bigger pieces of dirt than the paper. The oil catches some of them, but in order to let the engine breath better the holes have to be bigger (in a microscopic way). And too much oil affects the MAI, which is a while other problem. I decided several years ago it wasn't worth the small gain in performance to lose engine longevity.
 

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For filters there's two ways to approach it. One provides a set of pores that is the size of the largest particle that is let through. This is typically expressed in microns for average size and absolute. Nominal is typically smaller than absolute. So a filter that would capture something larger than 3 microns on average may be 10 micron absolute for the largest size that might go through.

The other is a particle arresting filter like HEPA. In this case filter efficiency is a function of size. These work by making the particle weave it's way through the filter media like a slalom. The dirt particle tends to hit the cones er filter fiber and get stuck. The spacing between fibers is generally larger than the size of particle it captures.

This can make a difference on filter capacity also. A paper filter that has pores of a certain size can be plugged pretty quickly with debris just slightly larger than that size. An arresting filter is somewhat more forgiving in this as it the spacing is in reality somewhat larger than the debris it's trapping.

I don't know much more about it than these generalities. Not really my field. If you start googling the subject you'll easily find enough to cure the worst case of insomnia.

No idea which technique K&N, Ate, etc use. If the later the larger pores may not be so bad. Be useful if this kind of info was included in the marketing hype.

I've seen several posts on the part of Scott from Softronic stating there really isn't anything to gain over the Porsche paper type. The before and after dyno runs I've seen published have been within the accuracy of the best dynos I know of, ~1%, so could easily be a wash.
 

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Of course K&N has found a market.

The reality is that foam based air filters gained popularity for off road and off road racing applications that exposed the filters to a myriad of conditions including mud, water, etc. Paper filters failed when deluged with water so the off road racers started putting foam based filters on their machines as "something was better than nothing". Company's such as K&N started developing a better filter for THESE applications. Next thing you know people started buying these filters for their street cars, thinking it was cool to bolt "racing parts" on their cars. But they never claimed to FILTER anything better!!

Do what you like. Just know you are sucking more stuff into your engine with K&N. That is not disputed. Is it enough to grenade your engine? Probably not. But I'd rather spend the extra few dollars to have the best filtration I can buy to protect my engine.... whether it be my sportscar, truck, boat, RZR or even lawn mower

We have a free country to make stupid (IMHO) decisions!
 

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Of course K&N has found a market.

The reality is that foam based air filters gained popularity for off road and off road racing applications that exposed the filters to a myriad of conditions including mud, water, etc. Paper filters failed when deluged with water so the off road racers started putting foam based filters on their machines as "something was better than nothing". Company's such as K&N started developing a better filter for THESE applications. Next thing you know people started buying these filters for their street cars, thinking it was cool to bolt "racing parts" on their cars. But they never claimed to FILTER anything better!!

Do what you like. Just know you are sucking more stuff into your engine with K&N. That is not disputed. Is it enough to grenade your engine? Probably not. But I'd rather spend the extra few dollars to have the best filtration I can buy to protect my engine.... whether it be my sportscar, truck, boat, RZR or even lawn mower

We have a free country to make stupid (IMHO) decisions!
Interesting thread here. I've used a K&N cone type filter on my 1995 M3 almost since the day I bought it. 15 years of track and street driving and the engine never had any problems at all. Compression is good, everything is good. The M3 engines from that period had very restrictive intakes. Anything you can do to open them up, with a corresponding computer chip really helped those engines. In contrast, the M3 stock eshaust was very free flowing and money spent there got you more noise than performance, so I left mine stock.

If you don't soak the filters with oil and if you let them dry like you're supposed to after cleaning and charging them, they work fine. Ii have Mass Air Flow Sensor on the M3 and no damage ever to it. I've routinely inspected the insides of my intake pipes for even tiny signs of contamination. Absolutely none. I think K&N are safe filters, if you take care of them. When they get dirty, they are not very efficient. They can't hold as much dirt as a paper filter. That's the main reason OEM is paper. Easier to service, just throw it away, and it lasts longer.

I'm not hearing much about intakes from the Cayman guys. There is a lot more emphaisis on exhaust. I don't really know what benefits a K&N or Evo air cleaner will give on a Cayman. I put an Evoluzion filter on my Aprilia Mille R (998cc two cylinder V twin) and a chip. Together they made it very torquey and fun. I tried a K&N on the same bike with same chip and got better high end, less low end, so I went back to Evo.

Evo makes a filter for the CS. It costs a mint...about 400 bucks, I think. I want to hear that it makes a fantastic difference before I shell out that much for a filter.

As to buying filters from big-box stores or Napa, I'm against it. Get the Porsche filter or get a resuseable perfomance filter if it makes a big improvement, but don't buy cheap filters for expensive motors. Not a good value.

The square filter is for the cabin air and it goes in front on the passenger's side next to the battery under that black plastic. You need to change those every 10,000 or so.

The stated interval for the engine air filter is 40,000 miles. I changed mine at a bit below 20,000 and thought it was pretty dirty. It's a huge filter. I guess that's what gives the long interval, but you start to waste gas if the filter gets too dirty.

I got mine at Suncoast. If you order on line, make sure you check the box correctly or just call them. They are good about returns, but who needs the hassle?
 

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There's an install article on the Evo filter with dyno runs. IIRC the increase was something like 5 hp. Been a while since I read it.
 

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Agree with most of what Six says.

The school of thought is that excess oil on the filter could build up within the MAF and cause issues. Having looked at MAF's I can see that if the oil was to collect on the resistor boards then it could cause overheating in a spot and cause it to burn out, but I have personally not come accross one that has definately failed in this way, just a lot of talk about it.

One thing I am certain about is most complaints of oiled MAF's I have seen were on VAG cars which had huge reliability issues of the Bosch MAF anyway....so although it's an aspect to think about, if care is taken as Six says it should not be an issue, if it ever was.
 

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Interesting thread here. I've used a K&N cone type filter on my 1995 M3 almost since the day I bought it. 15 years of track and street driving and the engine never had any problems at all. Compression is good, everything is good.
This means NOTHING. Some people can smoke for 30 years and don't get cancer. Doesn't mean that smoking isn't a factor in cancer.

I think K&N are safe filters, if you take care of them. When they get dirty, they are not very efficient. They can't hold as much dirt as a paper filter. That's the main reason OEM is paper. Easier to service, just throw it away, and it lasts longer.
No. Manufacturers use paper because they filter BETTER. Look up some of the really good tests done on filters. Even when PERFECTLY clean and oiled, K&N still filter the WORST. Manufacturers don't use these type of filters because they are GARBAGE.

As to buying filters from big-box stores or Napa, I'm against it. Get the Porsche filter or get a resuseable perfomance filter if it makes a big improvement, but don't buy cheap filters for expensive motors. Not a good value.
This has to be the funniest post I've read in a long time. You "don't buy cheap filters for expensive engines" but yet you are defending the worst filter on the market because it flows more air!!! You are a very funny guy!!!

Read some of this:

ISO 5011 Duramax Air Filter Test Report

You really have to go to some lengths to find a worse air filter than the K&N. But there marketing dollars have been spent very well!
 
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