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I need new tires on my Boxster S and am thinking of switching to all-seasons. I see that there are some new models from Michelin, Bridgestone and others that appear to narrow the gap with summer tires, although I fully understand that all-seasons are not in any way a substitute for the usual summer/winter tire changeover.

I never take the car out in bad winter weather, but would like to extend its driving season beyond temperatures that must be 44 degrees and above. The all-seasons would allow me to use it in colder weather and increase it's current annual mileage of less than 1,700. I'm looking for tires that will do a decent job in a straight line, on some mild twisties and in rain. That's about it. Does anyone have any recommendations from the current crop of all-seasons?

(Please, no rants about the heresy of putting all-seasons on a Porsche. I already get it. Thanks.)
 

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Pilot A/S 3 are fabulous tires. recommended them without hesitation. Never had them on a Porsche but multiple BMW's now for a couple years.
 

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Unfortunately, I think you'll find that the all-season tire selection for modern Porsches is very limited unless you are willing to look at non-standard sizes. I'm running Michelin Pilot HX MXM4 on 18 inch wheels. Those were the only all-seasons that I could find in the standard sizes. I keep my 20s on Pilot Cup 2s for the track. The MXM4s are good tires but I think they're closer to a summer tire than a traditional all-season (which may be exactly what you want).
 

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44 degrees and above?? I think you may have misunderstood something somewhere. That's about the cutoff point where all season or winter rubber will start to outperform summer rubber, but that doesn't mean they suddenly become unsafe or something. You can drive on your summer tires right down to near freezing temperatures perfectly safely. You can't push them the way you can when it's warm, but they won't get dangerous until at and below freezing. My cutoff is around 1 degree C, which is around 34 F.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
44 degrees and above?? I think you may have misunderstood something somewhere. That's about the cutoff point where all season or winter rubber will start to outperform summer rubber, but that doesn't mean they suddenly become unsafe or something. You can drive on your summer tires right down to near freezing temperatures perfectly safely. You can't push them the way you can when it's warm, but they won't get dangerous until at and below freezing. My cutoff is around 1 degree C, which is around 34 F.
That's the whole idea of getting all-seasons. As the temperature dips, I don't want to be looking at the thermometer before I take the car out and I don't want to keep sliding forward (which I have done) if I do hard braking with summer tires in colder months. I've done some pretty wide reading on this and the consensus seems to be that when the temperature falls below the low to mid 40s, it's time to keep the summer tires in the garage. Also, I'm sure you Canadians are much braver winter drivers than we are.
 

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Driving back from VIR in early november 2 years ago I had the same thoughts--temps right around freezing I'm doing 75 on P zero tires wondering how much grip I have.

I think the bottom line was 90% of the time, A/S tires would work just fine for the kind of street driving we do so I am also thinking A/S tires when the OE tires are done.

Right now, I like the DWS 06 conti's as a potential since I have the old DWS on a BMW. They are great on the street even if the steering response isn't razor sharp.
Mich. PS A/S3 are a possibility but they don't come in stock sizes and are a heavy tire. I keep hoping they'll add a stock size in 19".
 

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The last all-seasons I had were the Yokohama Advan S.4.

Maybe a bit quiet and cushy but excellent grip in the rain and they moved the thing in snow comparably well.

Having said that, being all-seasons I still had to be careful on wet roads in -say- 35 deg fahrenheit weather. For my next car I went with a setup with two (so far) wheel sets.
 

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I bought my Cayman a couple years ago and planned to drive it year round (Chicago area), but only when no snow/salt on roads. But the Pilot Sports turned into rocks around freezing, and were pretty unsafe (they had so little traction it was hard to start without spinning them). I also read that driving on the tires at low temps damages them. Since the fronts were nearing end of life, I replaced all 4 with Pilot Sport A/S (Tire Rack has a nice review of them). I've been very happy with them, and feel a little safer on long trips when I run into inclement weather (I never track the car). I did have to change the front size from 205/55ZR17 to 215/50ZR17. Did not notice any road noise change. Although they meet 100% of my driving needs, they don't look near as aggressive as the Pilot Sports they replaced.
 

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First off you actually can damage a summer tire in near freezing weather. Secondly you do loose about 30 percent of the tires traction per Continental Tire at 45 degrees.So there are some benefits to an all season tire if the car is not driven overly aggressive. The all season tire also will buy you longer wear. They are not going to be any noisier than the summer tires. If I can help let me know.
 

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First off you actually can damage a summer tire in near freezing weather. Secondly you do loose about 30 percent of the tires traction per Continental Tire at 45 degrees.So there are some benefits to an all season tire if the car is not driven overly aggressive. The all season tire also will buy you longer wear. They are not going to be any noisier than the summer tires. If I can help let me know.
thanks, Jim.

So the question is which brand might work best for our cars?

I can't find any tire in in my stock 19" size;any issues going up to a +1 size (245-275/40/19)?





















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44 degrees and above?? I think you may have misunderstood something somewhere. That's about the cutoff point where all season or winter rubber will start to outperform summer rubber, but that doesn't mean they suddenly become unsafe or something. You can drive on your summer tires right down to near freezing temperatures perfectly safely. You can't push them the way you can when it's warm, but they won't get dangerous until at and below freezing. My cutoff is around 1 degree C, which is around 34 F.
Weasel, when you mentioned 1 degree C cut-off, I hope that you are not referring to HP summer tires? Not sure what tires you have but I found the Bridgestone, Michelin and the Pirelli summer tires to be very slippery as the temperature dips below 7 degrees C, definitely scary below 4-5 degrees C. I also read that you have no warranty on these summer tires at these low temperatures (near or below freezing) and they can actually crack and loose bits of tread! BTW, here in BC they can find you at partially fault if in accident while driving HP summer tires after October... some cities and municipalities have actually enacted bylaws dealing with this. For those south of the border; 7 C = 45 F

My recommendation is if you want to use your car below 7 degrees C then you should invest in a different set of rubber... I bought a set of 18" Pirelli Winter Sottozero II's with wheels from the Tire Rack, last winter they were simply incredible in the rain and snow providing exceptional traction and control!

I always say: "The best accident is the one that you avoid!"
 
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