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I could never understand the appeal of PCCB. The advantage advertised is they last longer, don't fade under extreme heat and they are lighter than steel. All these are important for high performance driving. Just cruising on a highway or driving in the city? Don't need them. However seems Porsche won't warrant them for track use? Have they become just eye candy then? That kinda goes against Porsche principles. I think that if they charge such premium price for them they should warrant them for track use. The only exclusion would be modifying the car with aftermarket suspension, power mods etc.
 

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I could never understand the appeal of PCCB. The advantage advertised is they last longer, don't fade under extreme heat and they are lighter than steel. All these are important for high performance driving. Just cruising on a highway or driving in the city? Don't need them. However seems Porsche won't warrant them for track use? Have they become just eye candy then? That kinda goes against Porsche principles. I think that if they charge such premium price for them they should warrant them for track use. The only exclusion would be modifying the car with aftermarket suspension, power mods etc.
One benefit of the PCCBs that would be noticeable every time the car was driven on the street is the reduced unsprung weight. The only PCCB-equipped car I've ever driven is a 981 Sypder, and the suspension feel and steering precision was sublime. It felt astonishingly light on its feet compared to any other 981 I've driven.
 

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So, I don’t see them as irrational for street use. In exchange for a higher up-front cost you get:

1. Little to no break dust
2. Pretty much a lifetime part

How much does a pad and rotor change cost on steel? Is it $3k? I don’t know because I haven’t done one yet but it sounds like if the car was your dd or heavily driven you’d be doing this every 3 years or so.

So the ceramics pay for themselves in ~9 years?

I understand that “if” somethings goes wrong with them it’s “very bad” but that’s the case with the PDK as well.

Is my math off? I never use my brakes so I’m not the right use-case. ;)
 

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One benefit of the PCCBs that would be noticeable every time the car was driven on the street is the reduced unsprung weight. The only PCCB-equipped car I've ever driven is a 981 Sypder, and the suspension feel and steering precision was sublime. It felt astonishingly light on its feet compared to any other 981 I've driven.
You can only make that claim if you drive the exact same Spyder with steel rotors for a direct comparison. There are other ways to reduce unsprung weight: forged rims and lighter tires.
 

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So, I don’t see them as irrational for street use. In exchange for a higher up-front cost you get:

1. Little to no break dust
2. Pretty much a lifetime part

How much does a pad and rotor change cost on steel? Is it $3k? I don’t know because I haven’t done one yet but it sounds like if the car was your dd or heavily driven you’d be doing this every 3 years or so.

So the ceramics pay for themselves in ~9 years?

I understand that “if” somethings goes wrong with them it’s “very bad” but that’s the case with the PDK as well.

Is my math off? I never use my brakes so I’m not the right use-case. ;)
You can achieve low dust with ceramic brake pad compounds. Good quality steel rotors will last a long time under normal/non-track driving. And replacing pads and rotors would cost $3K if done at a dealership. It would cost a fraction of that if you do it yourself. So what's better having a lifetime part that you are afraid to break by going to track, or having a disposable part that is cheap to replace and you can beat the crap out of anywhere your heart desires?
 

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You can only make that claim if you drive the exact same Spyder with steel rotors for a direct comparison. There are other ways to reduce unsprung weight: forged rims and lighter tires.
Yep, high-quality forged wheels will reduce unsprung weight. The last two sets of custom Forgeline (for M3) and Kinesis (911TT) wheels I ordered were about the same price as PCCBs. And a direct comparison would require driving a non-PCCB car and one with ceramics back-to-back. Given that the 981 Spyder rides on a standard 981 suspension, comparing it to other PASM-equipped 981 GTS/Ss I've driven seems reasonable.
 

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You can achieve low dust with ceramic brake pad compounds. Good quality steel rotors will last a long time under normal/non-track driving. And replacing pads and rotors would cost $3K if done at a dealership. It would cost a fraction of that if you do it yourself. So what's better having a lifetime part that you are afraid to break by going to track, or having a disposable part that is cheap to replace and you can beat the crap out of anywhere your heart desires?
Interesting reply, and it would seem that you have a certain disdain for PCCB brakes, that's fine and to each their own, I will still be ordering them on my next car... ;)
 

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You can achieve low dust with ceramic brake pad compounds. Good quality steel rotors will last a long time under normal/non-track driving. And replacing pads and rotors would cost $3K if done at a dealership. It would cost a fraction of that if you do it yourself. So what's better having a lifetime part that you are afraid to break by going to track, or having a disposable part that is cheap to replace and you can beat the crap out of anywhere your heart desires?
Interesting reply, and it would seem that you have a certain disdain for PCCB brakes, that's fine and to each their own, I will still be ordering them on my next car... <img src="http://www.planet-9.com/images/smilies/wink.png" border="0" alt="" title="Wink" class="inlineimg" />
Not quite. I just think they should be covered by warranty when used for high performance driving on track or elsewhere.
Please go ahead and order them, just don’t come back here complaining later 😝
 

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You can achieve low dust with ceramic brake pad compounds. Good quality steel rotors will last a long time under normal/non-track driving. And replacing pads and rotors would cost $3K if done at a dealership. It would cost a fraction of that if you do it yourself. So what's better having a lifetime part that you are afraid to break by going to track, or having a disposable part that is cheap to replace and you can beat the crap out of anywhere your heart desires?
Interesting reply, and it would seem that you have a certain disdain for PCCB brakes, that's fine and to each their own, I will still be ordering them on my next car... <img src="http://www.planet-9.com/images/smilies/wink.png" border="0" alt="" title="Wink" class="inlineimg" />
Not quite. I just think they should be covered by warranty when used for high performance driving on track or elsewhere.
Please go ahead and order them, just don’t come back here complaining later 😝
Cool, they stay on the build sheet, and I do agree that they should be warrantied like any other part of the running gear...
 
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