Planet-9 Porsche Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have read a few threads on this but looking for updated long term use feedback as well.

I'm thinking of upgrading the stock brakes on my 987.2S. What options are available? I'm on the BBS SR rims as well so I'll need to figure if the rims can take the bigger disc and caliper configuration.

Stock brakes are definitely not bad but for the occasional E braking, I do find them a tad soft so something firmer and a tad quicker to stop will give a confident boost.

I don;t track.

Thanks in advance
 

·
Administrator
'11 Cayenne TT, '09 Boxster
Joined
·
699 Posts
Before spending $$$ on new hardware - I'd suggest making certain what you have is performing to spec.

When is the last time the brake fluid was flushed and the ABSPSM modulator bled? Doing that should take care of the "tad soft". Then the question is - can you get to the lockup point with the current brakes (when ABS kicks in)? If so - new hardware isn't going to do a thing for you because what kicks the ABS in is loss of traction from the tires, and that won't change by changing brake hardware. It can be improved on with fresh rubber, and tires rated excellent for braking (Tirefarm has some excellent tests for that..)

Since you don't track chances are you aren't overheating the brakes (which can be partly fixed with larger brakes - maybe..) and chances are - all new hardware will do is look pretty, give you bragging rights and empty your wallet. I haven't noticed Porsche skimping on brakes on any vehicle they've made... if anything they go above and beyond what anyone could ever use in braking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
643 Posts
I haven't noticed Porsche skimping on brakes on any vehicle they've made... if anything they go above and beyond what anyone could ever use in braking.

^ This^ I never had one of my Porsche cars on a track. In spirited drives on back roads, the 986 brakes, (the first production featuring a monoblock piece of aluminum to make the caliper, derived from one of their race cars) were "incredible" stoppers, same with the 944.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Before spending $$$ on new hardware - I'd suggest making certain what you have is performing to spec.

When is the last time the brake fluid was flushed and the ABSPSM modulator bled? Doing that should take care of the "tad soft". Then the question is - can you get to the lockup point with the current brakes (when ABS kicks in)? If so - new hardware isn't going to do a thing for you because what kicks the ABS in is loss of traction from the tires, and that won't change by changing brake hardware. It can be improved on with fresh rubber, and tires rated excellent for braking (Tirefarm has some excellent tests for that..)

Since you don't track chances are you aren't overheating the brakes (which can be partly fixed with larger brakes - maybe..) and chances are - all new hardware will do is look pretty, give you bragging rights and empty your wallet. I haven't noticed Porsche skimping on brakes on any vehicle they've made... if anything they go above and beyond what anyone could ever use in braking.
Thanks for chiming in. I do appreciate your views.

Last time the brake fluids were flushed and bled was when my mech tried to put on the GT3 MC which he could not get to work.

As for ABS, fortunately I've not gotten to a point where I have needed the ABS kick to in and I hope I never have to. Age and memories of a bad accident have robbed me of speed cojones.

And because of the accident memories, I'd feel even more confident if the brakes reacted faster and pedal travel is less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just putting the stock Cayman R pads on will probably solve all of your issues.
Even pedal travel?

I'm on Brembo discs and Low Met pads now. These perform worse than the R pads? I find them better than the stock S pads they replaced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Short of using racecar hydraulics there is always going to be some pedal travel to deal with. The pads themselves can compress also. What you describe needing is a hard pad that has a lot of initial bite, and good friction at low pressure / temperature. I feel like the OEM R pads are a good starting point before getting into pagid etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Short of using racecar hydraulics there is always going to be some pedal travel to deal with. The pads themselves can compress also. What you describe needing is a hard pad that has a lot of initial bite, and good friction at low pressure / temperature. I feel like the OEM R pads are a good starting point before getting into pagid etc.
Will have a look at them when its time for a replacement. Thanks.
 

·
Administrator
'11 Cayenne TT, '09 Boxster
Joined
·
699 Posts
Thanks for chiming in. I do appreciate your views.

Last time the brake fluids were flushed and bled was when my mech tried to put on the GT3 MC which he could not get to work.

As for ABS, fortunately I've not gotten to a point where I have needed the ABS kick to in and I hope I never have to. Age and memories of a bad accident have robbed me of speed cojones.

And because of the accident memories, I'd feel even more confident if the brakes reacted faster and pedal travel is less.
If you've never gotten into the ABS - then you haven't reached the limits of the existing brakes. I'm in that same category actually. What you will find if the ABS/PSM modulator (and it's important to realize it DOES do both functions) is correctly flushed is a much firmer pedal. When I did mine, I was running the Foxwell NT530, and my mechanic friend was under the car opening bleeders. We went from wheel circuit to wheel circuit following the Foxwell instructions, and he told me he was quite surprised at the amount of air that was flushed out when I briefly activated the ABS pump for each wheel circuit. I can report the pedal felt much firmer afterwards - less spongy feeling - which is exactly what air in the hydraulics feels like. I suspect that having the brakes correctly flushed, including the ABS/PSM modulator will give you exactly what you're looking for - brakes that react faster and have less pedal travel. The cost of having this done - even at dealer prices - is a tiny fraction of what new hardware would cost you. Worth the gamble IMHO.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top