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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Merging to the right traffic is a challenge on my 981 Cayman due to the blind spot facing right side. In fact, I almost hit another car during my dealer test drive back in Nov 2015 and it was a lesson learned to be extra careful now with my own car but I have become paranoid overtime when merging. Are there any after-market solutions that you can recommend? Any members using wide angle rear view mirror with success? Tks.
 

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If you think the Cayman has a blind spot, try the Boxster with the top up. Yikes. Seriously, I don't have any issues with blind spots with my Cayman. With a head check, can always see if I have a car on my blind spot or not, but am always aware of my surroundings, and have my side mirrors always adjusted at the blind spots (where you cannot see the body of the car). I absolutely hate those little wide-angle mirrors attached to the mirror, but if you tolerate them, they're an option. I still wouldn't put them on the Boxster, but you'd have to be aware of your surroundings 100% of the time with that car, since you might miss a car in your blind spot if you need to do a quick swerve, and a car happens to be there. I feel a little claustrophobic when I drive that car, but got used to it quicker than I thought. The side mirrors properly positioned should be all you need, plus keeping an eye on your 6 as well. Not much you can do about that, other than what both of us suggested. Whatever works for you;).
 

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Has anyone fitted a curved mirror (driver' side in countries that drive on the opposite side) to their passenger mirror to give a wider view?

--
MY17 Macan S, MY16 Cayman GTS
 

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I installed the curved mirrors on both sides and they very much help but they are not as good as sticking an ugly bullseye mirror on the originals. The OEM curves look terrific and if you check them very regularly to stay aware, you'll be fine but if you want the quick glance and be certain look, the cheapies work better. If you do get the OEM convex mirrors, you should also move your head around a bit when you really need to be sure because changing the angle of your head relative to the mirror will change what you can see in it
 

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Mirrors can be adjusted to remove blind spots. I have been using it for years. It does take a bit of getting used to and you need to watch your six as noted above.

https://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/18/are-blind-spots-a-myth/
I've seen that argument before, and theoretically it is true. Plain old physics. Angle of incidence equals angle of reflection. Yes, combined with a movable driver's head, that should eliminate blind spots. It probably works in many, or most, vehicles. But it depends on several things including the driver's seat position and the design of the exterior mirror housing. I'm tall so I need the seat back all the way, reducing the angle. But more importantly - the outside edge of the mirror housing body blocks most of the outer edge of the mirror. All you see is housing. So you can't change the angle enough to see what's in the lane immediately behind your field of vision. And the passenger seat blocks much of the small side-rear window.
Besides, I like to see more than a sliver of that lane. I like to see if a car 2 lanes over is about to change into that lane before I cut into it. So I tried a couple of those fish-eye stick-ons. Some were too small or too fish-eyed to be useful. I currently use one about 2" in diameter which helps tremendously. I now can change lanes with confidence with one quick glance. However, it still isn't effective at night when all you can see is a bunch of lights. Its hard to determine the distance without other visual cues.
 
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There's that pedal directly under your right foot.

If you push it down to the floor for a few seconds, it magically removes any and all cars from your blind spot. Feel free to merge at that point. :drivingskid:
 

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There's that pedal directly under your right foot.

If you push it down to the floor for a few seconds, it magically removes any and all cars from your blind spot. Feel free to merge at that point. :drivingskid:
LOL, that's my favorite maneuver and definitely more fun (especially when downshifting into 2nd). But in urban congestion you rarely have more than a car length in front of you. Because, if you do, someone will put a car into it.
 
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There's that pedal directly under your right foot.

:drivingskid:
This is my approach!
I'll admit, I notice it more now that we added an ML350 to the stable with blind-spot warning. It's disorienting to hop in car without it after a while, but that SUV also doesn't tell me what the speed limit is like the Cayman! FWP, I know.... :p
 

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I installed the curved mirrors on both sides and they very much help but they are not as good as sticking an ugly bullseye mirror on the originals.
Thanks, I thought about getting the curved mirrors and spending a few hundred dollars to improve the looks of my mirrors. For now my ugly 2-inch stick-on blind spot mirrors that cost $3.99 are 100% accurate with just the movement of my eye (I don't need to turn my head). Glad to hear your product review as I like the look but I'll take function over aesthetics when it comes to something as important as changing lanes in a fraction of a second with complete certainty.
 

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I totally agree with those that point out that your mirrors may not be adjusted properly. Many people adjust there side mirrors so they can see a portion of the rear quarter panel. This is especially appealing when your rear looks like a 987 or 981 with those great hips. However, this is not the right adjustment so see your blind spot. The mirror should be rotated out just beyond seeing any of the rear of your own car. If you do this you should be covering your blind spot. Also, as I've told my wife after she clipped someone just a few weeks back, in addition to looking in your properly adjusted mirror you should continue to swivel your head and look over your shoulder. A quick movement that can remove all doubt about whats in your blind spot. Good luck!
 

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Merging to the right traffic is a challenge on my 981 Cayman due to the blind spot facing right side. In fact, I almost hit another car during my dealer test drive back in Nov 2015 and it was a lesson learned to be extra careful now with my own car but I have become paranoid overtime when merging. Are there any after-market solutions that you can recommend? Any members using wide angle rear view mirror with success? Tks.
Adjust your mirrors properly if you haven't. How To: Adjust Your Mirrors to Avoid Blind Spots - Feature - Car and Driver

Works very well. I have driven ragtops including my Boxster with the top up with no problems even on a congested highway. One thing to keep in mind is to remember to check your mirrors every 5-10 seconds so that you are aware of the vehicles behind you. That way no surprises.
 
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Having the passenger seat blocking the rear quarter window would obviously be a problem, but mine doesn't block it at all, and my wife has the seatback almost touching the rear, and lifted somewhat (for knee relief). Should be a very easy problem to fix. My seat is close to the carpet as well, and all the way down. My mirrors are way more outside than looking at the rear, and still have room, so on the Cayman, they're not an issue (on other cars, they're at the limit). I always wondered why people want the freaking side mirrors pointed at the back, if you already have the rearview mirror for that. It's just a matter of getting used to it. As a motorcycle rider, I'm always watching my mirrors, especially in traffic, but still always do a headcheck.
 

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Here is a Youtube video about the SAE method.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIkodlp8HMM

The one caution that I would give to someone switching to this method is to stay alert to what is behind you, as you don't see an overtaking car out of the side mirror until they are much closer than the traditional mirror setting. Your central mirror is an important part of the setup.

The advice in the video about shoulder checking is also good, and not just because of motorcycles.
 
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I've been using the SAE mirror method to adjust my mirrors since 2004 when a friend of mine shared it with me. I admit that it took some getting used to but once I became comfortable with the concept I have embraced it and trust my life to it more than the traditional method. I drive for a living and haven't had an incident (knock on wood).
 

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Here is a Youtube video about the SAE method.
A picture (or a video) is better than a thousand words, as the saying goes. Anyway, that's exactly the way mirrors should be adjusted. A lot better alternative than distracting wide-view inserts IMO. I always do a headcheck as well, and the Cayman has enough visibility to afford that. The Boxster no, so that's why I said it's important to watch your mirrors, so you always know if you have a vehicle (especially a motorcycle) in your blind spot. Thanks for posting that video for others to adopt that (correct) method.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
My mirrors are correctly adjusted and use shoulder check all the time but my real problem is when merging slowly into a curve and the passenger seat completely blocking the visibility of incoming cars. Refer to the drawing below:
View attachment Blind Spot Slow Traffic Merge.docx
In the drawing: I am in the green line with red car merging into the blue line with an approaching orange car.
I will explore all your suggestions, Tks.
 

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My mirrors are correctly adjusted and use shoulder check all the time but my real problem is when merging slowly into a curve and the passenger seat completely blocking the visibility of incoming cars. Refer to the drawing below:
View attachment 158274
In the drawing: I am in the green line with red car merging into the blue line with an approaching orange car.
I will explore all your suggestions, Tks.
I am not sure that any mirror setup would resolve that situation. Merging on a curve doesn't seem to be very good highway design.
 
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