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Greetings,

I'm looking to purchase my first Porsche. I like the lines of the Boxster. It would be my daily driver in Chicago.
My concern is, what care and feeding do I need to be aware of for driving in Chicago snow? Should I just not buy one?

All input is welcomed.

Thank you for the help.
 

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With a set of winter tyres the Boxster works really well in snow - so long as it isn't more than about 2" - any more than that and you will get stuck because of the ground clearance. Personally I also love real wheel drive in snow -- allows you to control where the car goes with your right foot...

I drove mine through 3 New England winters with no problems (apart from working from home on bad days!) - only stopped because I want this amazing machine to last as long as possible...
 

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Greetings,

I'm looking to purchase my first Porsche. I like the lines of the Boxster. It would be my daily driver in Chicago.
My concern is, what care and feeding do I need to be aware of for driving in Chicago snow? Should I just not buy one?

All input is welcomed.

Thank you for the help.
I have a 987.1 boxster base which I have driven the last 2 winters in MA. I have a 22 mi commute into Boston and I do have public transportation options if the weather is really bad. The car is decent in the snow for sure. I have Michelin Pilots on the car and I just run those all year (I know, I really should get a winter wheel/tire set up). I just take it slow starting out so everything comes up to temperature. I'm more concerned about the corrosion underneath that I'm probably incurring. I do wash it regularly and only have $15k into the car so I'm only planning 4-5 years of ownership.
Another bonus, mine has heated seats. Between those and the small size of the cabin it gets warm really fast.
These are rugged cars, I look forward to driving this car all year long.
 

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I have driven my Cayman for three winters and can echo the previous comments regarding how good they are in the snow. I strongly recommend that you disregard any comments that summer performance tires are OK in winter. You are taking a considerable risk if you do it. Stopping distances in the cold are multiples of those for snow tires, even on bare pavement. There is quite a bit of information out there.

I have another car (Genesis sedan) which I tend to drive more in the winter, even though the Cayman is better and more fun. It's the other guy that I don't trust and I would rather have the Genesis hit than the Porsche.

Good luck!
 

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I have driven my Cayman for three winters and can echo the previous comments regarding how good they are in the snow. I strongly recommend that you disregard any comments that summer performance tires are OK in winter. You are taking a considerable risk if you do it. Stopping distances in the cold are multiples of those for snow tires, even on bare pavement. There is quite a bit of information out there.
You are correct that stopping distances are increased and adhesion compromised at temperatures below 7°C with summer tires. Of more concern is the fact as temperatures fall below freezing and beyond, the compounds used on summer tires can actually crack and delaminate. Summer tires in winter can be a very, very bad idea.

As to driving a Cayman in winter, I guess if you stay pretty much on city streets and the Queensway in Ottawa you'd be okay, but up here in the Laurentians, the roughly 3" clearance between the road surface and the various plastic airfoils and brake ducts under car means if I did drive my car in winter, I'd likely be leaving a trail of broken plastic bits behind me....this past winter, my wife slid into a frozen snowbank at less than 30 kph with her Macan. Cost me $1,200 to get the broken plastic bits fixed.
 

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As to driving a Cayman in winter, I guess if you stay pretty much on city streets and the Queensway in Ottawa you'd be okay, but up here in the Laurentians, the roughly 3" clearance between the road surface and the various plastic airfoils and brake ducts under car means if I did drive my car in winter, I'd likely be leaving a trail of broken plastic bits behind me....this past winter, my wife slid into a frozen snowbank at less than 30 kph with her Macan. Cost me $1,200 to get the broken plastic bits fixed.
I suspect that your R has a few less inches clearance than my S with stock suspension. Point well taken, though, I cracked the door sill (plastic) two years ago on an icy snowbank. $1,800.

The biggest PITA for me is that I live on a crescent, and the plow takes forever to do my street. They do, however, plow the cross street quickly, leaving a bit of a Himalaya to cross. Not doing that in the Porsche.
 
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