Planet-9 Porsche Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Maybe I should post this on one of the threads already started on brake pads, but some of the issues are new so I thought I'd start a new thread.

I replaced my pads yesterday, along with a complete fluid flush. It took longer than anticipated for the following reasons.

First, the pins in the calipers were all really, REALLY tight! I had to drive them out with a drift, they were never loose enough to allow me to pull them out with my hand. One, (LR) was extra tight and took a while. This was also the last wheel I did so I guess I was getting tired by then.

Second, the pads DID NOT want to come out. I had to pry from underneath to get them started, they were stuck to the backing pads that were in turn stuck/attached to the pistons. I assume Porsche has some technique for getting them out easier, but this took longer than any other part of the job, getting the *()*^*&% pads to come loose!

The pads had no provision for the sensors, they did have the slots but no holes to allow the sensors to securely fasten, so I zip-tied them to the brake lines.

The backing pads on the rears were little round things that had a metal circular spring clip to go into the holes in the pistons. Most were almost totally worn/rusted away, only one side of one wheel had the complete clips left. I pulled them all off and just used anti-seize compound on the backs of all the pads. No squeal so I must have done all right.

Some of the bleeder screws were also really REALLY tight! That 300# Hun must have tightened them! I know of no reason to bleed one screw before the other on the calipers, sometimes I did the inside first, sometimes the outside. I used my pressure bleeder and a catch bottle, but one bleeder kept leaking so I went back and tightened it more. It was snug, but I guess not snug enough.

I purchased the hardware kits for the job, and the front kit had the wrong spring clips, they were too short. The fronts and rears are the same as far as I could tell, so I reused two spring clips, new pins all around and new clevis (clevi?) in the pins.

One question: I nicked up the calipers getting the pads out, is there any special touch-up paint available for them? It looks sort of like an epoxy coating, but it chips off really easily.

I am pleased with the job, bedded in the pads and they work great, no squeal, and hopefully no dust either.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,809 Posts
Question: were you pressing down on the spring clip while trying to remove the caliper pins? They could have been pretty stuck if they hadn't been removed previously, but if you didn't press down on the spring while removing them, that would make it doubly hard.

The OEM pads are attached with an adhesive to the anti-squeal dampers you mentioned, from the factory (the adhesive is also on the back of new dampers if you ever choose to replace them). They apparently have to actually adhere to the pad in order to function fully. Some people suggest using a thin paint scraper to separate the pad from the damper first, before trying to remove the pad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oh yeah, I was pressing down on the spring clips, but the pins were really stuck. Even after they cleared the clips they wouldn't come out without driving with a hammer and drift.

Looking back, maybe a wide putty knife would have separated the backing pads.
 

·
Boxster Enthusiast
Joined
·
1,769 Posts
I use a screw driver in the slot on top of the pads to pull the pad tward the caliper to compress and free it up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I tried that too, with limited success. Best results were when I used my pry bar and pried against the bottom of the pads using the rotor hub as a fulcrum. I ended up chipping some of the red coating on the calipers as I've mentioned.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top