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Hi,

I'm finalising my order for my 719 Cayman GTS tomorrow. I have a build date secured for Jan. Thank you to all of your for your help so far.

I currently have a 981 Cayman S, and I waited until I had 2000 KM on it before I drover it 'hard' (over 4,000 RPM), despite Porsche telling me I could drive it hard from day 1, once the engine was warm :)

718 QUESTIONS

01 - Break In: what is the recommended break in for the 718 GTS (i presume the same as the 718 S)?

02 - Warm Up: how quick does the 718 warm up in comparison to the 981? On a 718 S test drive, i thought it warmed up almost 3 times quicker?

Thanks again for all of your help, much appreciated.
 

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This is what the manual says:
The moving parts of a new vehicle must be run in. The parts require the first 2,000 miles (3,000 km) for this purpose. The oil and fuel consumption may be somewhat higher than normal during this period.
During the running-in period, drive as follows:

  • Preferably take long trips. Avoid frequent cold starts with short-distance driving whenever possible.
  • Avoid full throttle starts and abrupt stops.
  • Do not participate in motorsport events, sports driving training or similar events.
  • Avoid high engine speeds of 4,000 rpm or more. Drive at low engine speeds when the engine is cold.
  • Do not let the engine labor, especially when driving uphill. Shift to the next lower gear in time (use the most favorable rpm range).
  • Never lug the engine in high gear at low speeds. This rule applies at all times, not just during the break-in period.
There may be a slight stiffness in the steering gear-shifting or other controls during the break-in period which will gradually disappear.
Text Font Tachometer Auto part Measuring instrument


Page 16 | 2017 718 Boxster Manual | Porsche iManuals
 

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I could see that water temperature might come up faster in a 718 due to additional heat management issues as a consequence of the turbo setup...but it's the oil temp you want to have up (I use 75 degrees C) before working the engine hard.
 

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There are so many opinions about breakin. I went by Porsche's recommendation in the manual. It was hard to keep the revs below 4000 for so many miles ( a few slip ups along the way). My car now has 8600 miles and hasn't used a drop of oil and runs flawlessly. "17CS PDK. I drive in sport and auto in town and manual sport or non sport outside of town and my trip mileage on trips including a little in town driving has been around 27mpg. 70-80mph cruising on freeways.
 

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This is what the manual says:


  • Preferably take long trips. Avoid frequent cold starts with short-distance driving whenever possible.
I would say the manual is giving good advice there but an important piece they've missed is that you should be varying the RPMs a lot - no steady highway speeds for miles and miles and miles.

  • Avoid full throttle starts and abrupt stops.
  • Do not participate in motorsport events, sports driving training or similar events.
  • Avoid high engine speeds of 4,000 rpm or more. Drive at low engine speeds when the engine is cold.
Porsche are happy to completely ignore these points on their driving school cars which they flog from delivery miles onwards and then happily sell them with a warranty after the season ends. My CGTS was a driving school car for the first 2700 miles where full throttle starts and abrupt stops were about all it did for a living. Doesn't use any oil at all and runs strongly now at 7500 miles or so.

For break-in, 2000 miles seems excessive to me. In an ideal scenario I'd drive a few hundred kilometers of twisty roads at steady speeds right after delivery and then start building the RPMs a bit more at moderate loads. Half throttle at 2000RPM puts more stress on the engine than 4000 or 5000 RPM at light throttle and end up going full chat before long. And doing plenty of engine braking, helps seating the piston rings properly.
 

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This is what the manual says:
The moving parts of a new vehicle must be run in. The parts require the first 2,000 miles (3,000 km) for this purpose. The oil and fuel consumption may be somewhat higher than normal during this period.
During the running-in period, drive as follows:

  • Preferably take long trips. Avoid frequent cold starts with short-distance driving whenever possible.
  • Avoid full throttle starts and abrupt stops.
  • Do not participate in motorsport events, sports driving training or similar events.
  • Avoid high engine speeds of 4,000 rpm or more. Drive at low engine speeds when the engine is cold.
  • Do not let the engine labor, especially when driving uphill. Shift to the next lower gear in time (use the most favorable rpm range).
  • Never lug the engine in high gear at low speeds. This rule applies at all times, not just during the break-in period.
There may be a slight stiffness in the steering gear-shifting or other controls during the break-in period which will gradually disappear.
View attachment 175377

Page 16 | 2017 718 Boxster Manual | Porsche iManuals
This.
And according to my dealer and the mechanics there, occasional short spurts over 4000 rpm are OK--but no sustained periods. This is all about heat management between moving parts.
And no long steady state drives--vary the speeds and rpm.

The suspension and all other moving parts also run in during the first while--not just the engine.
 

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I use 180°F or 82°C as warmed up. But warm-up and break-in happen faster at higher rpm, within the factory rpm limits. If you let the PDK keep upshifting and engine revs down in the teens, it will take as many miles as the factory says to break it in. But if you force your average break-in revs to double that, it will broken-in in half the mileage. An engine doesn't know how many miles you drive. It only knows how many revolutions it has seen.
That from an engineer, and I'm not talking about writing code...
 

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One thing that hasn't been said is how long it takes to warm up: this varies based on what the starting oil temp is on a cold start (colder ambient temperature, colder oil), and how high of RPMs it's doing.
Just today, my starting oil temp was at about 30*F (0*C) - I let it sit idling until the temperature started to move up, then started going (oil temp was still only just above 40*F). It is not reasonable for me to wait 15-20 minutes for my car to idle to appropriate operating temperature, but I do keep RPMs between 2000-3000 on the way to work until it is warmed up (I have a 30 minute drive, it does get warm enough on the way there).

I did do some "spirited driving" when I was still in the break-in period - there's no way you can resist it with a new car. Your car will not suddenly explode by doing so.
 

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I let it sit idling until the temperature started to move up, then started going (oil temp was still only just above 40*F). It is not reasonable for me to wait 15-20 minutes for my car to idle to appropriate operating temperature
It is wrong to let the car "warm up" idling as it takes a very long time to do so, increasing wear on the engine and the engine oil as well as it picks up fuel from the rich mixture. You want to start and drive off almost immediately.

The optimal procedure is to start it, wait a few seconds for the RPMs to settle after the cold start routine the ECU does to heat up the catalysts and then drive it very gently until you see sufficient oil temp.

(my personal procedure uses the PDK in manual as the normal shift program shifts at way too low RPM to avoid higher loads on the engine - I take it up to 2300-2500 at light throttle for warm-up rather than have it auto-shift at 1600)
 

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It is wrong to let the car "warm up" idling as it takes a very long time to do so, increasing wear on the engine and the engine oil as well as it picks up fuel from the rich mixture. You want to start and drive off almost immediately.

The optimal procedure is to start it, wait a few seconds for the RPMs to settle after the cold start routine the ECU does to heat up the catalysts and then drive it very gently until you see sufficient oil temp.

(my personal procedure uses the PDK in manual as the normal shift program shifts at way too low RPM to avoid higher loads on the engine - I take it up to 2300-2500 at light throttle for warm-up rather than have it auto-shift at 1600)
When my car starts at 0*C, that cold start routine (higher RPM idle) takes a full minute or 2 to run, which is how long I wait.
 

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That's fine, I don't remember it taking that long on my car in winter but I've shelled out for underground parking this winter so my memory might not be entirely accurate. As long as people know that idling your car for long periods of time to warm it up is bad, all is well.
 

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I think it took about that long to settle to slow idle on my 981, but it could take my entire commute (25 min) to get the oil to operating temperature in the winter.
I did the same routine; keep the car still until the idle slowed down, then drive below 4000 rpm until the oil got out of the blue. I don't remember what that temperature was exactly.
 

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The worst thing about idling to warm it up is moisture and acid buildup in the engine oil. And carbon deposits on the intake side. Exhaust systems used to be vulnerable to that but today's cat/exhaust systems are worlds better. You should want to minimize all that by warming it as soon as possible, but not at high engine rpm and loading. Porsche is right when they says start it and drive it. You can put a small heat source under the engine to warm it if you need quick warm up. I used to have a 50W magnetic heater I'd slap underheath and there was one that could be bolted under VW and Porsche engines back when I lived in the snowmelt. I've used shatter-resistant bulbs under engines in the past too. I wouldn't mess with any block heaters or hose-installed heaters, unless recommended by Porsche.
My typical warm-up to 180°F is in nice weather year round, and takes about 7-8 minutes in suburban driving with 35-45 mph speed limits, in light traffic, with spirited starts from stop but not at drag race acceleration, while limiting my revs to mess than 4500 rpm. I typically cruise between 3000 and 4000 rpm in Sport Plus normally and while warming up. IMO, that is optimal for these engines.
 

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[/QUOTE]Your oil got up to 180 that quickly or the coolant?[/QUOTE]

Well, I checked this afternoon at about 75°F and it took 10 minutes for my oil temp to hit 180°F at speeds of 0-50 mph. So my estimate was a little low
 

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Your oil got up to 180 that quickly or the coolant?[/QUOTE]

Well, I checked this afternoon at about 75°F and it took 10 minutes for my oil temp to hit 180°F at speeds of 0-50 mph. So my estimate was a little low[/QUOTE]
Oh, OK I thought you meant during sub-freezing temperatures. Also I guess it could be different with a 911 instead of a 981 or 718.
 
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