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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone asked me recently about how my lift was working so I wanted to show some pics demonstrating how well the quality lifts lift works for my lowered Cayman. First I use a set of long approach ramps and can drive up without a single scrape to anything despite having a gt3 style bumper just a few inches off the ground! Next the rolling Jack clears under my car front to back with no problems, evidently someone else had a problem with their rolling Jack hitting their Cayman somewhere underneath. Here are a few pics I shot with the iPhone let me know if you want pics of anything in particular while I have the car up in the air.
 

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Thanks for the pictures.
I have been thinking about a lift in my garage, but I have two questions:
a. Is the concrete reinforced where you put the lift posts? Or do you spread the load with a larger metal plate?
b. How tall is your garage? And with the Cayman on top, is there room below for another car?

THanks. Ed
 

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I'll 2nd that question. What are the dimensions of your garage? I saw a video once of them installing your lift but for some reason it looked like a bigger garage at the time.

How close can the lift posts be to the garage walls and do the floors have to be a specific density or type of concrete?
 

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I have a Rotary four post lift in my home garage (local Ferrari shop uses Rotary).

It sits on 6 inch concrete. You can put the posts as close to the wall as you can get them. My Cayman does not need special approach ramps. My ceiling is only 9 feet, but I can park my 911 on it and still have room to get the CS under it.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the pictures.
I have been thinking about a lift in my garage, but I have two questions:
a. Is the concrete reinforced where you put the lift posts? Or do you spread the load with a larger metal plate?
b. How tall is your garage? And with the Cayman on top, is there room below for another car?

THanks. Ed
a.) No the concrete is just the standard concrete poured for a residential garage floor although my floor has an epoxy finish on it, not that it makes it any stronger, just looks nicer. :) The feet of the posts do have 12"x12" metal plates on the bottom of them that I suppose help distribute the load some, they also have spots where you can put bolts through if you want to bolt into the concrete but there was no requirement to do so, so we didn't.

b.) I can't remember the height to the beam, but the height to the garage door when raised was about 108"-110" if I remember correctly. With the Cayman on top you'd have to have a lower profile car to go underneath in my situation that's why I typically put the Cayman underneath and the Jaguar on top because I can raise the Jaguar up 4" higher than I can raise the Cayman up. Now I could get both higher if I changed my door lift from the standard type to the flush mount above the door type and at some point I will do that and get an extra 6" or so of clearance for everything.

I'll 2nd that question. What are the dimensions of your garage? I saw a video once of them installing your lift but for some reason it looked like a bigger garage at the time.

How close can the lift posts be to the garage walls and do the floors have to be a specific density or type of concrete?
Well it is a 3 car garage, but the 3rd car slot is a bit smaller than the main two spaces. I don't recall the measurements off hand but I guess I can get out the tape measure again and go at it. I have the posts closest to the wall about 6" from the wall, you'll always have a little space due to the plates on the bottom of the posts that would butt up against the wall before the post itself. I don't know that the floors have to be any specific density other than standard residential home construction but you might call Quality Lifts and ask to speak to one of their tech people who could probably give you an exact answer on that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have a Rotary four post lift in my home garage (local Ferrari shop uses Rotary).

It sits on 6 inch concrete. You can put the posts as close to the wall as you can get them. My Cayman does not need special approach ramps. My ceiling is only 9 feet, but I can park my 911 on it and still have room to get the CS under it.

Steve
My long approach ramps are necessary because my car is lowered and has a lower GT3 style front bumper, a regular Cayman would not need the long approach ramps, I have a set of regular approach ramps and use them for the Jaguar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
how much for the lift?
I think it was around $3k, but I don't recall what the lift cost vs. the accessories, check with Quality Lifts and they can get you a direct discounted price for members here, or refer you to a reseller in your area that may be able to cut a better deal. Basically the first step is to call them and let them know you are coming from Planet-9.com.

Speaking of changing mounting type. Here's a DIY article on the process. I'd probably be wearing goggles and my motorcycle helmet if I were to attempt to mess with those springs.

Garage Door High Lift Conversion
I have that type of torsion spring now, but I need a motor attached to that rod to lift the door there as opposed to a normal opener like I have now. I looked at that article and didn't see an opener installed at all, just the moving of the track up higher and shifting to a torsion style spring which is what I did last fall before having the lift installed, there is an article in our Articles section about it.
 

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I highly recommend the Liftmaster 3800 Jackshaft opener. That is what I had installed when I had my high-rise door rails and lift installed. The opener is very quiet, small footprint and does not interfere with the clearance above your lift.

I priced out the Quality Lift with Ken's configuration for the lift, rolling jack, casters, etc. and here was the breakdown. I suggest you call Quality Lifts or a distributor for updated pricing.

$2,994 Lift w/ Delivery
$650 Installation
$750 Rolling Jack
Free at the time Casters (normally $168)
$156 Drip Trays (3x)
$100 Extended Ramps (50") - 36" Included

Nice setup, Ken. I wish I had the extended ramps.
 

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Every car guy should have one of these lifts - best money I have ever spent in the garage. I have a 25x25 garage - with this lift I am able to have 3 cars and 3 motorcycles in a 2 car garage, with plenty of room to move around and room for storage, work benches, tool boxes, etc.

There are many people building and selling these lifts now. I am only familiar with one brand - Rotary - so I can't speak for or against the others, but here are some tips:

1. Make absolutely positively sure that the lift you are going to buy has a positive locking mechanism on all four corners. You don't want your car in the air with just hydraulic pressure, especially if you or other cars are underneath it. Each corner should be adjustable so that the lift is level, and all four corners are bearing the load equally. Use the locking mechanism religiously.

2. Although people do assemble their own lifts to save some money, I wouldn't recommend it. It requires some very heavy lifting for three people or two NFL linebackers, plus the lifts are more complicated than they look. Also the delivery truck needs a lift gate at best but better to have a fork lift around, as these things are delivered in one package all bundled up and weigh about a ton. It's good to get it as close as possible to your assembly point. I paid for assembly and am damned glad I did. The local dealer was useless and after six weeks of calling he still wouldn't come set it up, so I called his competitor in the next town and the competitor was there the next day. The local dealer has subsequently gone out of business, boo hoo. Anyway make sure that whatever brand you buy, someone competent can come install it.

3. Get the 120v pump instead of the 220v, unless you plan to go up and down a dozen times a day every day.

4. I bought four enormous casters from Rotary that allow me to move the lift around. This is not something I do very often, but originally I had my lift set up in a warehouse and decided to move it home. We put it on casters, moved it outside, winched it on to a flatbed tow truck, and took it home. After removing some door trim, the lift cleared the garage door by 1/6 of an inch. It was easy to move - my ten year old daughter was my only helper. It sure was a lot less work than disassembly, moving all the heavy pieces, and reassembly.

5. If you store a car long term with the lift raised, and you have valuable stuff underneath - car, motorcycle, whatever, put drip pans underneath the car in the air. Don't ask me how I came to this conclusion. :(

I bought a Rotary because it is the lift I am most likely to see in pro shops. Also, Rotary has it's own welding school to train it's workers. Price wise, it may be the most expensive.

Good luck! It's a great thing to have.

Steve
06 CS
84 911
00 M5
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Every car guy should have one of these lifts - best money I have ever spent in the garage. I have a 25x25 garage - with this lift I am able to have 3 cars and 3 motorcycles in a 2 car garage, with plenty of room to move around and room for storage, work benches, tool boxes, etc.

There are many people building and selling these lifts now. I am only familiar with one brand - Rotary - so I can't speak for or against the others, but here are some tips:

1. Make absolutely positively sure that the lift you are going to buy has a positive locking mechanism on all four corners. You don't want your car in the air with just hydraulic pressure, especially if you or other cars are underneath it. Each corner should be adjustable so that the lift is level, and all four corners are bearing the load equally. Use the locking mechanism religiously.
Very much agree and one of the things I love about the Quality lift is that it uses rods between all 4 corner locks (not cables) and the rods are hidden inside of the lift rails, not on the outside where you could snag on them.

2. Although people do assemble their own lifts to save some money, I wouldn't recommend it. It requires some very heavy lifting for three people or two NFL linebackers, plus the lifts are more complicated than they look. Also the delivery truck needs a lift gate at best but better to have a fork lift around, as these things are delivered in one package all bundled up and weigh about a ton. It's good to get it as close as possible to your assembly point. I paid for assembly and am damned glad I did. The local dealer was useless and after six weeks of calling he still wouldn't come set it up, so I called his competitor in the next town and the competitor was there the next day. The local dealer has subsequently gone out of business, boo hoo. Anyway make sure that whatever brand you buy, someone competent can come install it.
Also very much agree and although the Quality Lift is easier to assemble than most (lots of hardware pre-installed), if you have them install it you get a longer warranty and someone to call if something wasn't done right.

3. Get the 120v pump instead of the 220v, unless you plan to go up and down a dozen times a day every day.
Also agree here as well, the 120 regular house plug-in is plenty fast enough for e and I'm not going up and down a dozen times a day. I think some places try to sell the 220 as an upgrade and most people don't need it. I also don't think you need a separate air compressor to operate the locks or rail lift or other items, my manual ones work just fine and there are less lines going to the lift. I guess if you were servicing cars every day it might be different.

4. I bought four enormous casters from Rotary that allow me to move the lift around. This is not something I do very often, but originally I had my lift set up in a warehouse and decided to move it home. We put it on casters, moved it outside, winched it on to a flatbed tow truck, and took it home. After removing some door trim, the lift cleared the garage door by 1/6 of an inch. It was easy to move - my ten year old daughter was my only helper. It sure was a lot less work than disassembly, moving all the heavy pieces, and reassembly.
I also got the castors and used it to move my lift over to its resting spot after assembly, not something you will use a lot, but does make moving the lift a heck of a lot easier, I could do it 1 handed.

5. If you store a car long term with the lift raised, and you have valuable stuff underneath - car, motorcycle, whatever, put drip pans underneath the car in the air. Don't ask me how I came to this conclusion. :(
Again also agree, I have an old Jaguar up top, the drip trays are a necessity and probably were when the car was new. :) I like the ones from Quality Lifts because they are coated, lightweight but strong. I have 3 of them.

I bought a Rotary because it is the lift I am most likely to see in pro shops. Also, Rotary has it's own welding school to train it's workers. Price wise, it may be the most expensive.

Good luck! It's a great thing to have.

Steve
06 CS
84 911
00 M5
One of the reasons I went with a Quality Lift was because it is 99% the same as their commercial grade Challenger Lift. I know several large shops that use Challenger Lifts. It was important for me to have thicker cables, better pulleys, better welds, steel, etc. than some of the el-cheapo lifts you see out there. I recently saw one at a car show for $2k that I wouldn't put a lawnmower up on given its materials and design, so I was willing to pay a little more to get a lift that I knew was safe and would last. Challenger/Quality has 3 factories and they make all their own stuff, some brands are simply relabelled equipment from other companies or you have no idea where/how it was made. It takes some research to find the right lift, but it is well worth it.
 

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One of the reasons I went with a Quality Lift was because it is 99% the same as their commercial grade Challenger Lift. I know several large shops that use Challenger Lifts. It was important for me to have thicker cables, better pulleys, better welds, steel, etc. than some of the el-cheapo lifts you see out there. I recently saw one at a car show for $2k that I wouldn't put a lawnmower up on given its materials and design, so I was willing to pay a little more to get a lift that I knew was safe and would last. Challenger/Quality has 3 factories and they make all their own stuff, some brands are simply relabelled equipment from other companies or you have no idea where/how it was made. It takes some research to find the right lift, but it is well worth it.
Amen to that.

This is one of those purchases in life that you are going to use a long time, and it has to be well made and safe. There are times to shop on price, and times when shopping on price is a stupid thing to do. Find a really good lift and just suck it up and pay for it. It will pay you back over and over.

Steve
 

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Might be a dumb question, but it seems like the majority here leans towards 4-post lifts.

How do you work on suspension/ wheels/ brakes?

Most of my friends have 2 posts, and I find them to be extremely convenient (and easy on the back).
 

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Might be a dumb question, but it seems like the majority here leans towards 4-post lifts.

How do you work on suspension/ wheels/ brakes?

Most of my friends have 2 posts, and I find them to be extremely convenient (and easy on the back).
Ideally, it would be best to have a two post AND a four post in the garage. But on a four post you can just use a simple bottle jack to get a wheel in the air while the car is at a back saving height.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Might be a dumb question, but it seems like the majority here leans towards 4-post lifts.

How do you work on suspension/ wheels/ brakes?

Most of my friends have 2 posts, and I find them to be extremely convenient (and easy on the back).
I have the rolling jack between the ramps that lifts either the front or rear of the car at one time making it plenty easy to change wheels/tires/brakes. A 2 post lift requires more clearance as well as anchoring into the concrete and for home use I was worried about stability/safety.
 

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I have the rolling jack between the ramps that lifts either the front or rear of the car at one time making it plenty easy to change wheels/tires/brakes. A 2 post lift requires more clearance as well as anchoring into the concrete and for home use I was worried about stability/safety.
Point taken. I guess it never occurred to me that you could use a jack on the lift.

I've always been a bit leery of the 2 post lifts, for the life of me I still don't understand how they don't tip. I've got several hours under them now, so I am more comfortable using them, but still never fully confident in them (despite using a garage that has cars on the same lift 24/7)

After this thread, I think a 4 poster might be in my near future... but I like the idea of having both. :dance:
 
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