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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since i saw the Cayman, like most, the feeling of "having to have it" was upon me. Now, alittle older and financially secure, the chance of owning a Cayman isnt too far away...except i have a few questions. This would be my first Porsche, i've owned 3 VW's and 2 Audi's so the expected cost of ownership obviously comes with the vehicle, which isnt my gripe. My question is, if the service guide says "replace X part(s) at 15k" and the part isnt broken, or showing signs of wear&tear, do you have to change it anyway? i still believe in the "if it aint broke dont fix it" mentality. Can somebody please tell me if this is a good attitude to have owning a Porsche? This will be a 2nd car and WILL see a few hours of daily use during the summer months and garage kept during winter with minimal use (starting, short trips ect)

My idea is just to get the car in motion and not have it "sit" in a garage for days on end whereas the fluids can possibly settle and cause later issues down the road. And when something does need replacement what are the going costs? i herd this varies between dealerships and states. Just any estimates on usual things that need changing...looking into a lightly used certified Porsche. Any help of course would be good!
 

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an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.Some things are your call.But i personally like to keep things clean and fluids changed regularily.As for cost dealerships have"specials" from time to time.Not too bad.....search this site and you will find all kinds of posts on winter storage and maintenance etc etc.Good luck with your search for the car....
 

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Welcome to the site, as madcow mentioned have a look around at our FAQ, Glossary, and of course the forum for all sorts of information. With regard to replacing things that aren't broken I've never had my dealer ask me to do that. Maintenance is usually just oil, filter(s), lubing things up, etc. It's always up to you whether or not you say replace a brake rotor because it is worn, etc.

As for finding a car you can check with our dealer sponsors who often times have specials for our members and who list cars in our classifieds along with members who are selling their cars. Good luck in the search!
 

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A/C air filter, oil filter, intake air filter fair enough. The Accessory belt at some point in its lifetime. All else discuss with the service manager.
 

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I had your concerns and mindset about a couple of years ago. I'm sure you will peruse this board and there's a lot of good info to be had. Most importantly, there are ALOT of people experienced in buying, modifying, and repairing Porsches. Almost all of them will be happy to entertain questions if you PM them. I've found everyone I've asked questions to have been incredibly helpful and I've learned alot from them.

It's my first Porsche, and if you're somewhat like me, you'll be in love with your car, right after your kids and wife or s.o. Maintenance has been (knock on wood) pretty darn good.........MUCH MUCH better than I expected.

There are usually some specials on oil changes and maintenance packages, but you can find an independent shop (preferably small) where you can get to know the owner/chief mechanic who can help you take care of your Porsche. I live in the Bay Area and I drive about 80miles to my mechanic's shop. Figure around $200 for an oil change, $250-300 for the front tires and $300-350 for the back tires (more if they're 19 inches). Plan on switching tires at the recommended miles, though many have gotten more life out of their tires (unless you track your Porsche). As K-ManS notes, the search function is pretty powerful and most likely, you'll be able to find recommended dealerships or mechanics in your area.

Best of luck in your search and let us know when you've officially joined the family!
 

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Being a relatively new Porsche owner...but long time owner of Euro sports cars....I have always found that these cars need continuous and regular maintenance....by factory trained folks...those that know the cars, have the latest word from the factory about things to look for and an attentive owner....thus if you drive the car regularly, get it looked at regularly by an experienced person...you won't have many problems...I am amazed how how many folks here spend the money on these cars and then nickel/dime taking car of them...be it oil changes, brakes, so on....having traveled lots to Europe and seeing owners manuals in Europe calling for much shorter, more frequent maintenance than the same car in the US....tells me that these long maintenance cycles seem to be driven by the sales/marketing end of the world and not the engineer side....having just purchased a new cayman...changing the oil in 2000 miles....watching the gunk, ****, sand...likely metal particles from the breakin show up in the filter I provided....I felt very good about paying for the oil change....earlier than 10 or 20K miles...just my thoughts....never having to pay for serious engine work on Ferrari, MB...etc...
 

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That's a good point about independent shops. Also, FWIW you can always get 10-15% off parts and labor if you ask for the PCA discount, from the dealer shops. At least here in the Bay Area.
 

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I guess, IMO, these folks who buy an expensive...be it used or new....exotic sports car...go cheapo on maintenance....which is usually a small portion of the cost of these cars...depreciation is likely the big item...and then want to drive into the dealer and get the same treatment as their customers...who buy and have it serviced at the dealer....or to try and figure out what might be complex problems on a car....asking folks here for their best remote guess....not sure I understand that...if the car is new and under warranty I would advocate that you have Porsche take car of it....they get the latest info...their techs likely see lots of similar vehicles...and provide the best basis for pushing PNA for the best support for your car...if you have a problem....just my thoughts....this is not to say I am not offended by Porsche's lack of forthright communication about know problems...not providing good service/diagnois info to everyone....they should do that....
 

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don't mean to hijack the thread, but I too am considering my first Porsche.

You seem to have answered the maintenance questions.

But what about reliability? Are the Caymans proving to be pretty reliable? It seems like the IMS failures are cured since 2006, and there are no major problem areas...

The most I'm hearing is rattle/squeaks, but that isn't uncommon for any sports car, and most Cayman owners don't seem to have complaints there either.
 

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don't mean to hijack the thread, but I too am considering my first Porsche.

You seem to have answered the maintenance questions.

But what about reliability? Are the Caymans proving to be pretty reliable? It seems like the IMS failures are cured since 2006, and there are no major problem areas...

The most I'm hearing is rattle/squeaks, but that isn't uncommon for any sports car, and most Cayman owners don't seem to have complaints there either.
According to the Consumer Reports I am looking at, the Cayman has the best reliability of any Porsche. Of course I don't know how good CR is for things like this, but that's at least a data point, along with info from this site.
 

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Once the car is properly broken in and its "sorted out" over the first few thousand miles I think the Cayman should be very reliable....as to squeaks, etc...I had none on my 2007CS and non on my 2009...but the quality and fit of the 09 seems much better...should be a very solid car
 

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Optics1,

I've had limited experience with my Porsches compared to some (5 years-Cayenne and Cayman), I've found them to be more reliable than other imported cars I've owned (BMW, Saab, Volvo), and more reliable than VW/Audi, if friends who own those marques are to be believed.

Build quality is excellent on the new Porsches, and the Cayman is as well built a car as I have ever seen. The only expense I've had that was unexpected, was on my Cayenne when I had to replace the front rotors in addition to the pads at 45k miles. Then again, the Cayenne weights 5000 lbs.
 

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I guess, IMO, these folks who buy an expensive...be it used or new....exotic sports car...go cheapo on maintenance....which is usually a small portion of the cost of these cars...depreciation is likely the big item...and then want to drive into the dealer and get the same treatment as their customers...who buy and have it serviced at the dealer....or to try and figure out what might be complex problems on a car....asking folks here for their best remote guess....not sure I understand that...if the car is new and under warranty I would advocate that you have Porsche take car of it....they get the latest info...their techs likely see lots of similar vehicles...and provide the best basis for pushing PNA for the best support for your car...if you have a problem....just my thoughts....this is not to say I am not offended by Porsche's lack of forthright communication about know problems...not providing good service/diagnois info to everyone....they should do that....
I fall into that category, I bought used, I'm frugal (not really 'cheap'), and the overriding factor in doing my own service work is I LIKE to do it and I want to know it is done right. Yes, even Porsche dealerships have screwups occasionally. I have NEVER paid someone else to change my oil, nor would I ever consider it, even on a new car. (And I'm 62 yr. old and have owned dozens of cars) My dealer is 75 miles away and its not always practical for me to take it in for servicing, besides the fact I don't want to let them do it. I have a mid-rise lift and do my own oil changes, brake work, trans/diff changes, brake fluid flushes, etc. I don't do my own alignment or body work, otherwise its pretty much me.

Caymans have a rep as very reliable, even by Consumer Reports, and that's just fine with me, but what needs doing will mostly be done in my own garage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I am buying a Porsche for all the right reasons, as i know some people who get caught in the "sterotype" of a guy with money buys a sports car for no absolute reason...in my case, and like most, i enjoy driving. I am not worried about depreciation, which in alot of cases can be an issue with owners of not just Porsches but any car in general, to me a Porsche should be for life, so depreciation over the years isnt of my concern. I, however, am concerned about obvious reliability, as somebody mentioned about the IMS unit which was worked out after 06' which was the cars 1st year production, i am looking at 08' models certified pre-owned with as little miles as possible assuming they worked out all of the 1st year kinks which im sure they did, they have fantastic deals on "used" models with decent amount of miles. Can anybody tell me how much the brakes and rotors (if they got a chance to replace them yet) would cost? if going to a dealership is well worth it? as opposed to going to a small shop that knows the models inside and out without the 90$ an hour price tag? im far from being cheap about it, and im willing to spend the money, but i also looked into the Ferrari 550 Maranello and the 355 spyder but then realized that the labor rates were mad! make a long story short, Porsche has been rated most reliable over Ferrari anyhow. The truth is, i want to know as much as i can about this car before i take the plunge, im sure everybody here has done the same thing. Im just worried of buying 1 and having to live in the shop for no apparent reason since thats just the luck i have! also when comparing them to the 911 people said that they would take a Cayman S over a 911 anyday...isnt Porsche defeating the "king of sports cars" by creating its greatest threat...another Porsche model?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I fall into that category, I bought used, I'm frugal (not really 'cheap'), and the overriding factor in doing my own service work is I LIKE to do it and I want to know it is done right. Yes, even Porsche dealerships have screwups occasionally. I have NEVER paid someone else to change my oil, nor would I ever consider it, even on a new car. (And I'm 62 yr. old and have owned dozens of cars) My dealer is 75 miles away and its not always practical for me to take it in for servicing, besides the fact I don't want to let them do it. I have a mid-rise lift and do my own oil changes, brake work, trans/diff changes, brake fluid flushes, etc. I don't do my own alignment or body work, otherwise its pretty much me.

Caymans have a rep as very reliable, even by Consumer Reports, and that's just fine with me, but what needs doing will mostly be done in my own garage.

I wish i was that handy! and had the tools and space (garage, lifts, ect..) i know im going to get sucked into paying top dollar since im not cheap either BUT i do like to save a buck IF a buck can be saved, hence an oil change SHOULD NOT cost 200$ if somebody handy knows how to change it. I think the dealer makes it hard for average guys like us NOT to work on these cars so we keep the dealers alive by giving them 200$ a pop on every lube job. This is just a theory...im 26 and spent years of studying to become a licensed Optician, so picking a car, for me, is more time consuming as opposed to somebody who wants 4 wheels and an engine. I looked into Maserati, Aston, Lotus, ect...and the conclusion remains with Porsche only because of the driving experience and quality of craftsmanship.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Optics1,

I've had limited experience with my Porsches compared to some (5 years-Cayenne and Cayman), I've found them to be more reliable than other imported cars I've owned (BMW, Saab, Volvo), and more reliable than VW/Audi, if friends who own those marques are to be believed.

Build quality is excellent on the new Porsches, and the Cayman is as well built a car as I have ever seen. The only expense I've had that was unexpected, was on my Cayenne when I had to replace the front rotors in addition to the pads at 45k miles. Then again, the Cayenne weights 5000 lbs.
Im looking into a 08' Cayman S with moderate miles (under 15k) certified preowned. I like to hear that you were pleased with your experience...my 96' Audi A4 Quattro V6 (12 valve) 5spd managed to reach 198,000 miles until an Audi Mechanic offered me an astounding 4k for it, i ended up selling it since i never thought id get anything for it having that much miles. I believe that the cars reliability consists of the driver and how its cared for, but then you get cases where the owner does everything right and the car malfunctions and has a sea of problems, thats why i thought id ask Porsche owners IF, under their ownership the cars were as reliable as Porsche makes them out to be. So far, its looking extremely fantastic and the reviews are great.
 

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Optics, I purchased my '08 CS used with 7400 miles on the odometer in St. Petersburg, FL. The dealership had sold it to a local owner who decided a four door car was required. I know the car was locally owned because the owner's address was still in the PCM. I am at 31,000 miles now and my car goes in for annual maintenance today. So far, I have performed the annual maintennace and oil change at the dealer and changed the rear tires. I expect to change the front tires with an alignment today. And that list is all.

I have no squeaks or rattles when the windows are up, but there is a discernable rattle when the windows are down. I will say if you use the search function that these cars do develop rattles on occasion particularly in cold weather if I am any judge.

The Cayman S is the finest car I have ever owned. I am not sentimental about cars, but this one has changed my entire outlook on driving. Best of luck in your search.
 

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Regarding Optics hesitation in buying because of dealer shop rates, I offer this suggestion: Find a local indy shop that knows sports cars and foreign cars well and use them. Oil changes are really pretty simple, even on a Cayman, the only basic requirement beyond a DIY is that the car has to be level for all the oil to drain out. Jacking up in the garage is a little tricky and very time consuming(hence my mid-rise lift), but even the local quick change oil shop can do this since they drive over an open pit. Drain out the old oil, remove the filter (using the proper size filter wrench to avoid breaking the plastic housing), replace with a new filter, replace the drain plug, and re-fill with Mobil 1 0W-40 or 5W-40 oil, you're done. The oil costs me $7/qt at O'Reily's and the filter is about $12, less than $70 plus labor. A good shop shouldn't charge more than $30-40 IMO for that work. Oil changing isn't rocket science.

My '06 Cayman has been pretty reliable according to the service records (I got it with 47k miles on it, a CPO car), and other than a slightly annoying rattle when cold, its just about perfect. Yes, the CS is a 'sleeper' car in Porsche's lineup, and once the 911 faithful realize what a bargain it is, they will either come over to it or demand that Porsche drop it.
 

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Don't forget there are several somewhat pricy things that need to be done on these cars at two year intervals, like a flush of brake fluid.

(Not just Porsches, but really all cars with ABS should have their brake fluid replaced every two years as it's hydroscopic and you really don't want to know how much it costs to replace ABS parts. :eek: )

Most Porsche dealers have a labor rate of around $125/hour these days, so that's where the $200 oil change comes from.
 

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Don't forget there are several somewhat pricy things that need to be done on these cars at two year intervals, like a flush of brake fluid.

(Not just Porsches, but really all cars with ABS should have their brake fluid replaced every two years as it's hydroscopic and you really don't want to know how much it costs to replace ABS parts. :eek: )

Most Porsche dealers have a labor rate of around $125/hour these days, so that's where the $200 oil change comes from.
I agree, and I realize some of these things are beyond the abilities of some of the guys on this list, but again, its not rocket science. I just did a brake flush on my CS while changing the pads a couple of weeks ago, went to ceramic pads and while up on the lift I bled all four corners, didn't get the clutch yet.

Bleeding the brakes is really pretty simple, and can be accomplished without any special tools, although a pressure bleeder like I have makes it easier for one person, but with two the old 'pump the pedal' method will work, just don't let it go to the floor. I know a mechanic who simply opens all four (or eight in the case of a Porsche) bleeder screws and lets fluid drain out, keeping the reservoir filled. Slow but effective in most cases. Also messy. Changing transaxle oil is pretty simple too, made easier with a lift or pit.
 
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