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Yea, I admit that I err on the side of oil being fresh.
I live in the woods on acreage. Built homes over the years for kids so I could be with the grandkids.
So the "family fleet" is fairly numerous and oil changes are very common. Dad is the oil change man. 馃ぃ
2-post lift and 55 gallon spent oil drum. Have a service that comes pump it out when necessary.

Anyways, you can imagine that in my mind an oil change isn't something considered much more a task than fetching supper. In fact, I'll be done before someone could get to Whataburger and back.

By the way, I wish every vehicle was as easy as the 987.1. What a dream layout. I also wish other vehicles had the Porsche sump plate for such amazing access to what's REALLY going on in the motor.
 

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2014 Boxster S, Racing Yellow
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Porsche standards for oil intervals IMO, are cuckoo, way too long; I don't even let the Ford eclipse 4000. Oil changes are cheap insurance and without question cleaner oil in the engine = less wear and friction.
I absolutely disagree. The 3000 mile oil change interval was in vogue when filtration was lousy and oil additives were in their infancy. A lot of scientific data backs up longer duration oil change intervals.

I can provide numerous links from SAE test data (or you can Google them yourself) that indicate even plain 'ol dino oil with additives is good beyond 12000 miles with good filtration. In fact the most wear your car engine sees is right after an oil change. The worst period is during the first 500 miles and wear levels start to flatten at about 3000 miles. From 3000 to 10000 the wear levels are almost flat. The carbon suspended in used oil provides a wear barrier that new oil strips away.

My own results from Blackstone seem to back this up. My metal wear numbers are generally the same after 10000 miles as they are after 4000 miles, even with a couple weekends of track use thrown in there.
 

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Led, Three thousand is way too low, I don't disagree with you. And if the Ford went to 5k I wouldn't need a sleep tablet. I guess we disagree on the used versus new oil. In the end it doesn't matter we all care for these cars far more meticulously than most, they're babied and we like it that way. I'm confident in my regimen as I understand you are with yours, it's all good. Besides, especially in the last two years, one year has not even meant 3k mileage but it's still the annual change as stated by Porsche. In reality that's why my mileage is so low when it gets dumped, maybe this year it will be much higher, I'm going to try.
 

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2014 Cayman S
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1 year is a really good timeframe to change it. If you want to wait til August and use that as a year, that is fine also. 981 is an NA motor and is a little easier on the oil than the direct injected 4 cyl motors. so waiting to august, 7500 is fine and probably what I would do. If you have a direct injected turbo, motor, I would definitely do it from the March timeframe to count the year. Direct injected motors are harder on oil because fuel can be sprayed on cylinder walls and mix with oil more. Fuel degrades oil. This happens less on NA motors so you can go a little longer. I hope that helps.
I was always led to believe the 981 engines are direct injection also?

I personally have only done 2k this year as I've been away from home far too much. I will probably leave the oil change until next year when the minor is due for this reason.
 

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2008 Cayman RS (my version) and non-RS 2010 GT3
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I was always led to believe the 981 engines are direct injection also?

I personally have only done 2k this year as I've been away from home far too much. I will probably leave the oil change until next year when the minor is due for this reason.
If the car sits it can have some moisture sitting in that oil, another good reason to change it鈥
981 motors are DI motors, but so aren鈥檛 987.2 motors鈥
 

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At the end of the day it鈥檚 trying to prolong engine life鈥 I know f鈥檌ng idiots that don鈥檛 realize it needs to be changed 鈥 ever
A neighbor several years ago asked for help with the lawn mower, a four cycle. She reported that it ran then quit. It was minutes out of the box, you know the box that had the never opened crankcase oil in it.
 

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I absolutely disagree. The 3000 mile oil change interval was in vogue when filtration was lousy and oil additives were in their infancy. A lot of scientific data backs up longer duration oil change intervals.

I can provide numerous links from SAE test data (or you can Google them yourself) that indicate even plain 'ol dino oil with additives is good beyond 12000 miles with good filtration. In fact the most wear your car engine sees is right after an oil change. The worst period is during the first 500 miles and wear levels start to flatten at about 3000 miles. From 3000 to 10000 the wear levels are almost flat. The carbon suspended in used oil provides a wear barrier that new oil strips away.

My own results from Blackstone seem to back this up. My metal wear numbers are generally the same after 10000 miles as they are after 4000 miles, even with a couple weekends of track use thrown in there.
This!....People write about "dirt" and "metal shavings in the oil like these are 1950 Jeeps, their not. Late model Porsches are extreme examples of machining expertise (So are many new brands) If it makes you feel good to ignore Porsche engineers and change the oil sooner, have at it. Silly though. 馃榾
 

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The oil was changed in my Cayman in March of 2021. It sat on the dealers lot until I bought it in August of 2021. I have put 5k on it since I bought it Do I need an oil change now or can I wait based on only driving 5k since the last time it was changed?
Ah, the infamous oil change interval thread.

Sounds like your vehicle is 鈥渘ew to you鈥. It has been a year since the oil was changed and so according to the manufacturers recommendations you should change it.

My recommendation is that you do so, but because the car is new to you, you should send a sample of that oil to Blackstone Labs so you have some insight into the health of your new engine. You鈥檒l want to know as soon as possible if you鈥檝e purchased a vehicle with hidden issues. The analysis will also help you determine how much lubricity remains in your oil and so will help you decide what an appropriate OCI is for you based on your driving style and needs of your engine.

If you do a search for Blackstone Labs on this web site you can see some results as myself and others actually post them here. Hope this helps.
 

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This is the "feel-good" sort of thing at work. It just feels good to change the oil. Admit it.

If you can ignore the environmental impact that very frequent oil changes might have - perhaps changing the oil every time the engine is run, even for a moment might make one feel really good. I think @reblanchard was making a valid point - there is some basis behind the manufacturer's oil change interval recommendations - and those are usually created by the engineers, not the marketing department (although when BMW was paying for the first 2 years of service on their cars, the oil change interval strangely got really long - like 20,000 miles and 2 years..)

What's interesting - if you manage to get the full oil change interval instructions worldwide for a Porsche, you'll find different countries/regions have different change interval recommendations. Why? I suspect fuel quality has a lot to do with the recommendation. High sulfur fuel will contaminate the oil by basically creating sulfuric-acid in the oil, composed of the water vapor in the air and the sulfur in the fuel (the cause for BMW to replace an entire series of V8 engines back in the early '90s due to bore-scoring caused by the fuel in the US.) There are also different tables with different change intervals based on vehicle use - off-road = more frequent changes, dusty-environment = more frequent changes, short trips... well you get the idea.

That all said - I generally abide by 5-6,000 mile change intervals on most of my vehicles. My wife's Lexus gets the factory change interval (10,000 miles I believe.. I was impressed when I last took it in and they told me it wasn't due for another 6,000 miles - an honest dealership..) And I use oil that meets the manufacturer's latest standards. And I've had Blackstone analyze my oil (more often on the motorcycle actually) - and never had anything odd show-up, and always been told I could go further on the oil than I did.

So far that seems to have worked. The only car I ever had an internal engine failure on was a 1961 Volvo PV544, where a ring cracked and came up through the piston. The Volvo shop honed the gouge in the cylinder and put in a new piston and rings and said it was good to go... that one I'd been changing the oil every 1,000 miles (it was a long time ago) with Quaker-State 30W.
 
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If you have a M97 engine with an IMS bearing, then it make since to change your oil more frequently. Jake Raby of flatsixinovations suggests 3500 miles should be the change interval to prevent oil from invading the IMS bearing seals with dirty oil. He also suggests not to overfill your sump to prevent oil invasion of the IMS bearingl. Take a look at his video's please if you use a M97 engine. 9A1 engines do not have an IMS bearing, so longer oil fill times work.
 
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