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I have a 2014 981 BS, Rhodium Silver Metallic / S2. I am planning ceramic coating with paint correction. Questions:

1. I am considering doing front, frunk, front fenders, rocker panels back to air inlets. These seem to be logical stopping points and address areas most impacted by road debris. Comments welcome.

2. What is the typical time required to get this work done?

3. Any local Austin recommendations?

4. Any pricing info?

Thanks to all.
 

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I did the work myself over a 2 day period. Paint correction on day one, then masking and ceramic coating the next. I'm guessing 8 hrs total time, maybe a little more. The paint correction is by far the more time consuming process of the two. The ceramic instructions said keep the car indoors for 24 hrs after application and then up to a week of no rain or washing (this is from memory and probably varies by manufacturer). I see no reason not to ceramic coat the entire car. It is not that hard or time consuming of a process and I don't see the value in just doing "parts". If you were applying a clear film, that might be a different story.
 

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FWIW, given the areas you are doing and your mention of road debris I'm guessing you hope that the ceramic will protect from rock chipping and such which, despite many coating marketing schemes to the contrary, a ceramic/quartz/glass coating WILL NOT protect against anything but the lightest swirling. If you want rock chip protection, PPF (Paint Protection Film) is the only way to go.

3 or our cars are done with coatings, 1 is PPF...some thoughts on our 'journey':

Quartz/Glass/Ceramic Coatings

While these are often marketed as ‘scratch resistant’, with spiffy phrases like “Diamond-Infused 10h Hardness” it’s largely irrelevant. While the coating you put on your paint may indeed be technically ‘harder’ than your clear coat the reality is that it’s such an infinitesimal difference as to be practically meaningless. The hardest coating in all the kingdom will still be measurably softer than your fingernail.

Some more info from professionals regarding coatings and scratch resistance:
- Are ceramic coatings scratch-proof?:

What coatings do offer is great resistance to environmental contamination and excellent self-cleaning characteristics. While they are no silver bullet, “Never gonna wash my car again” solution, the best of them can indeed keep your car cleaner with less effort. And less effort means less touching of the paint which means less chance for marking up that paint. Additionally, they can provide some protection from ‘environmental incidents’ (aka ‘Bird Bombs’) which could otherwise permanently etch the surface.

Additionally, while coatings are not scratch proof, there are a few coatings that offer some ‘limited self-healing’ characteristics. Kamikaze Zipang is one that I have on 2 of our cars. Again, it’s very important to read carefully and understand the limitations of such technology. I’ve tried a bunch of coatings over the past 3 years, looking for one that offered the best protection and self-cleaning characteristics I could find, mostly with black paint in mind. Kamikaze was the best suited to my needs/desires in that area. From the US Vendors Website:

Quote:
"With Zipang Coat, the chemistry provides even higher levels of gloss and brilliance than their ISM / ISM Pro coatings, and it offers semi self-healing characteristics, meaning that the appearance of small swirls or imperfections in the coating surface will reduce when exposed to heat."

Note the words “REDUCE” as opposed to “ELIMINATE” as it’s an important distinction to consider when setting expectations. Although totally amateurish and done with a cell phone camera, a flashlight held in my mouth and a heat gun, a few paragraphs down in the notes I kept about my Zipang experience are some pics that illustrate this on a very minor level: Glass/Quartz/Ceramic Coatings – Kamikaze Miyabi, ISM, Zipang, 22ple, Cquartz, Gtechniq CSL, EXO and more.

Here’s a video where a professional explains it better than I ever could:
What does self-healing mean?:

A few other vids from a pro explaining various other considerations of coatings:
1. 5 Common MYTHS About Ceramic Coating!:

2. Will I Be Disappointed with a Ceramic Coating?:

Paint Protection Film/PPF:

In my mind, the next step up the ladder is Paint Protection Film, aka Clear Bra and a few other names that elude me right now.

PPF will provide a level of protection from road debris, chips and other defects and most current films have self-healing capabilities that can help minimize defects…again with limitations. My guess is due to the film thickness (8mil, I believe) vs coating layer thickness (probably measured in microns?) deeper defects can be reduced/healed better with PPF as opposed to coatings. We recently bought a new, black Corvette for my wife which we had STEK Dynoshield applied to all painted surfaces. I’m only 6 months in with it so no long term opinions but I’ve kept some notes on the first 6 months here: Life with PPF: STEK Dynoshield

The film also has some hydrophobic, coating-like properties built into it so self-cleaning effects will be present. Most films can be topped with a coating as well, perhaps further enhancing the coating-like benefits. Not cheap to have a whole car wrapped but if you’re gonna go big, may as well go REALLY big.

What folks smarter than I have to say about PPF:
- Should I get PPF or Ceramic Coatings on my car?:

Lotsa choices, no perfect answer. Your best means of knowledge and info is your PROFESSIONAL Detailer a trusted, a knowledgeable professional has seen and done far more than any half-wit hobbyist like myself ever will so it’s best to take advantage of what they can offer.

FWIW, here's some pics of the paint correction and coating application I did to our 2016 Cayman after getting it last Fall: 2016 Cayman correction and Coating
 

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I have a 2014 981 BS, Rhodium Silver Metallic / S2. I am planning ceramic coating with paint correction. Questions:

1. I am considering doing front, frunk, front fenders, rocker panels back to air inlets. These seem to be logical stopping points and address areas most impacted by road debris. Comments welcome.

2. What is the typical time required to get this work done?

3. Any local Austin recommendations?

4. Any pricing info?

Thanks to all.
As stated above, you are getting two different products and their applications mixed up. Ceramic coating is essentially a high end "wax job" and this will do nothing to protect your paint from road debris chips. What you are talking about is paint protection clear film such as XPel and others which are several mils thick, very strong and can deflect stones and road debris. Ceramic coatings can be applied over the top of the film, but they are to protect the surface from contaminants in the atmosphere and rain from adhering to the paint and dulling its surface.
 

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As far as price goes. I had the whole car done Ceramic Xpel with paint correction for $1370. I have no idea how that compares to other detailers.
I way you seem to be approaching this - I would do it your self.
If you want chip protection have the whole thing done professionally but it expensive; like $4000 to treat the whole car, paint, wheels, windshield, paint correction, clear film, and ceramic.
 

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I just had my new (to me) 2016 GT4 ppf'd and ceramic at dealership for $4000. The result is well worth the money, particularly after you spend big bucks on a GT4. If you haven't done these jobs before, you will not be able to match the perfection of the pro installers. The feel of a ceramic coating is an amazing, supernatural step above a clay job, deep cleaning, and wax. I've done several ppf jobs, and I improve each time, but, basically, it is quite difficult. Never attempted ceramic, but the directions seem tricky, and results are, apparently, not easily correctable (unlike film, which is guaranteed removeable without ripping off factory paint--an exception is the clear coat on headlights, don't try this!). This is my experience, perhaps I'm just lack the requisite skills.
 

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One other thing not mentioned - ceramic coating isn't a one time application, you need to do a booster application periodically to keep it at its best. In my opinion it is worth doing just to keep the paint from pitting from bird droppings and sap but, as said above, it does not protect against chips.
 

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Never attempted ceramic, but the directions seem tricky, and results are, apparently, not easily correctable (unlike film, which is guaranteed removeable without ripping off factory paint--an exception is the clear coat on headlights, don't try this!). This is my experience, perhaps I'm just lack the requisite skills.
Some folks like to make ceramic application out to be a big deal but really, with a little attention to detail, really not that difficult. Some products are a bit trickier to apply than others but still not nearly an insurmaountable task. The prep (decon, poilish, prep) is the time consuming part but the application is pretty straightforward.

Make a mistake? No big deal, a medium to fine polish will easily remove the coating, some perhaps a heavier compound, but aside from 1 or 2 pro-only products (Gtechniq Crystal Serum Ultra comes to mind) coatings are actually quite easy to remove. If you can do PPF, you can certainly do a coating; as a hobbyist, I KNOW that PPF (for me) is best left to pros!
 

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If you are doing ceramic yourself; be aware the detailers apply multi coats. Mine did 9.
I did my suv myself and applied 4 coats. Would have done more but bottle was empty.
 
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If you are doing ceramic yourself; be aware the detailers apply multi coats. Mine did 9.
I did my suv myself and applied 4 coats. Would have done more but bottle was empty.
Guessing 9 coats is a Ceramic Pro install?

Aside from insuring complete coverage, the question of multiple coats is sometimes debated as to value. One of the best performing coatings I've used was a single-layer and is not recommended to be layered.

I've done 3 layers with 22ple HPC and 2 of our cars have 3 layers (Kamikaze Zipang-Miyabi-Zipang) but generally unless using a topcoat like Gtechniq EXO (on top of CSL) or CarPro Gliss (on top of Cquartz UK 3) I'll stop at 2 unless using a combo of coatings or the above-mentioned coating + topcoat deal.

Like many things coating related, hard to know what's really gonna happen until you give it a go for yourself.

One guys thoughts on layering: Layering Coatings: How Much is too Much? | Ask a Pro Blog
 

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Congrats!

I have a 2015 CS in Rhidium Silver,,, that color is the bomb for sure.

Use Ceramic or a Sealant on the whole car AFTER you apply Expel or other PPF to the entire front and all rocker panels and lower half of rear fenders. You will be glad you did. Especially if you might hit a track or two and relatively high speeds. As others have said, ceramic and sealants will not protect against rocks and other hazards.
From my experience, the Expel saved me at least 3-4 potentially serious paint chips in one year. My experience with PPF has been that will normal paint maintenance you can get a very nice glossy shine with our paint color. Treat the PPF just like paint!. It will last until you want to put a new set on, no yellowing, peeling if properly cared for.

Best of luck whichever way you go.
 

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Yes it was Ceramic Pro
Once you're done all the prep doing the actual ceramic is easy

The Xpel did save me from paint damage this weekend. I was stopped at a light in a totally un-lite area Sunday morning when some guy runs into me then goes off into grass and trees. I think he was either drunk or super tired. So dark I couldn't see if there was damage. I thought he hit the mirror. Didn't seem to be damage. Got his info.
When I checked later looked like just black bumper marks on the rear corner that would polish out. Most of it came off but the car deflected off and got the wheel well edge so I took to my detailer. There were cuts into the Xpel which would have been paint damage without it. He replaced the Xpel panel and professionally did the corner so it looks fine again.
 
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Some of the amounts paid for ceramic coatings is staggering... anyway, I myself joined the ceramic wagon for a test run on my MB and 997... I used AvalonKing... the outcome was amazing... did it last? Not as long as advertised.. longer than wax? Yes ...
I buffed out my car out with 3m Finess it-2 (of course), then the ceramic stuff... the entire process took me two hrs, but the car was already perfect... I think having to do multiple coats isn’t necessary and if you do have too, it might not be as quality As others...
If you try this yourself, wash your car with dawn... all previous chit needs to be off, then buff it out...
 

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Some of the amounts paid for ceramic coatings is staggering... anyway, I myself joined the ceramic wagon for a test run on my 997... I used AvalonKing... the outcome was amazing... did it last? Not really... longer than wax? Yes
 

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Some of the amounts paid for ceramic coatings is staggering... anyway, I myself joined the ceramic wagon for a test run on my 997... I used AvalonKing... the outcome was amazing... did it last? Not really... longer than wax? Yes
Curious as to how long the Avalon King lasted and how you determined it was at end of life. Mileage v time? Climate?

Thanks
 

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Curious as to how long the Avalon King lasted and how you determined it was at end of life. Mileage v time? Climate?

Thanks
the first car I did was my C-class, the daily driver, because that’s the car that gets everything thrown at it... it lasted a good month before I noticed it wasn’t repelling water like it did at first... I was fortunate enough to be now working at home so when it was time for a car wash I just used water, I just wanted to see how long it lasted not using soap... well it I finally got it rain/dirty and started using car wash soap...id say two months before I was thinking it needed wax...

when I went to Kollege I worked at a stealership body shop, so I got real good and fast at waxing/buffing, so for me to wax a car, it literally takes me 20 minutes start to finish, so using regular old “race glaze “ works fine... for the folks that only like to do this once a year it might Not be the ticket...

Using AvalonKing takes some time,
Even for me... it took me 2hrs, so for the time it lasted, I probably use regular old liquid wax. As to know if and when it’s gone off the finish, it’s hard to fully know... and does it hurt to go over it, no... that would be like polishing the polish... And it doesn’t deflect rocks chips...
 

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the first car I did was my C-class, the daily driver, because that’s the car that gets everything thrown at it... it lasted a good month before I noticed it wasn’t repelling water like it did at first... I was fortunate enough to be now working at home so when it was time for a car wash I just used water, I just wanted to see how long it lasted not using soap... well it I finally got it rain/dirty and started using car wash soap...id say two months before I was thinking it needed wax...

when I went to Kollege I worked at a stealership body shop, so I got real good and fast at waxing/buffing, so for me to wax a car, it literally takes me 20 minutes start to finish, so using regular old “race glaze “ works fine... for the folks that only like to do this once a year it might Not be the ticket...

Using AvalonKing takes some time,
Even for me... it took me 2hrs, so for the time it lasted, I probably use regular old liquid wax. As to know if and when it’s gone off the finish, it’s hard to fully know... and does it hurt to go over it, no... that would be like polishing the polish... And it doesn’t deflect rocks chips...
Thanks for the info, have seen a few generic reviews of it; they seem kinda mixed as far as longevity goes but most seem to be pleased with it.

Edit: I'm one of those every 1 year (if not 2-3 year ) guys. I like clean cars, don't like cleaning cars. Thank God for Agate Gray Metallic paint! So easy to keep presentable.
 

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Thanks for the info, have seen a few generic reviews of it; they seem kinda mixed as far as longevity goes but most seem to be pleased with it.
It works okay... I actually buffed out my 987 today and waxed it and it looks just as good as AvalonKing... took me an hr to buff and 1/2 hr to wax... it was 94f today
 
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