Planet-9 Porsche Forum banner

1 - 20 of 96 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have mastered changing pads in my 987, but now getting a 981GTS. The rear calipers are the usual open top so, changing pads for the rear is the same as for the 987's. Anyone care to walk me through changing the front pads for the 981? I've already seen the article on swapping out studs for the caliper bolts, but once you have the caliper in your hand, what is the process for swapping pads? I'm betting it is easy, but thought I'd check with the community first.

D
 

·
Caymudgeon
Joined
·
710 Posts
Once you have the caliper off, the pads come out the bottom of the caliper. There is a spring clip at the top of the pad and there are pins at the bottom of the pad on each side. Push up slightly on the pad to compress the spring clip and then slide the bottom of the pad toward the center to free the pad from the pins.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Mr. Brown...
I thought it might be easy, but this sounds insanely easy!.
So, next step is to investigate changing the mounting from "bolts" -- which are one time each usage according to PAG, to mounting studs as per Cup cars.. and some reasonable track day pads.

Oh yea, need to receive the car -- its off the coast of Costa Rica or so, heading to SD... and then the 2000 mi break in period. Yea, I can wait for that.
Regards. D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,850 Posts
this is the part i hate the most.. the worse.. the longest 2.5 weeks to come.. of the whole trip... stay sane!

lemon
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
thanks lemon...

PS.. do you all have the caliper studs to replace the bolts?? and then,... for "light" track day duty, what sort of pads have been working well with 981's. My experience was pagid yellow's on my 987.

thanks. D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
747 Posts
thanks lemon...

PS.. do you all have the caliper studs to replace the bolts?? and then,... for "light" track day duty, what sort of pads have been working well with 981's. My experience was pagid yellow's on my 987.

thanks. D
The closed front caliper is a real pain in the a-s. The rears are easy and take a few minutes. One clip and tap out the pin and R&R pads. Ive switched all four pads 3 times and flushed fluid. it takes 2.5 hrs to switch pads on all four wheels includes R&r wheels.. Basically from the time you pull it in till you drive out. Add one hour to power flush so a total 3.5 hrs pads and flush,my first time took 4 hrs..You also need to unplug the abs and brake pad sensors and disconnect the bracket on the strut. I installed the tergett studs because the stock bolts are junk. The studs also give you a place to hang the caliper during the procedure. This is the first car ive had that i couldnt switch pads in less time than it took me to R&R the wheels. Must cars pads and flush is a 1.5 hr job total. carl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,850 Posts
The closed front caliper is a real pain in the a-s. The rears are easy and take a few minutes. One clip and tap out the pin and R&R pads. Ive switched all four pads 3 times and flushed fluid. it takes 2.5 hrs to switch pads on all four wheels includes R&r wheels.. Basically from the time you pull it in till you drive out. Add one hour to power flush so a total 3.5 hrs pads and flush,my first time took 4 hrs..You also need to unplug the abs and brake pad sensors and disconnect the bracket on the strut. I installed the tergett studs because the stock bolts are junk. The studs also give you a place to hang the caliper during the procedure. This is the first car ive had that i couldnt switch pads in less time than it took me to R&R the wheels. Must cars pads and flush is a 1.5 hr job total. carl
mine in less than 15 min..


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
747 Posts
mine in less than 15 min..


you have an open caliper that's how long it takes,same as the rear. We are talking apples and oranges.The time I quoted includes raising the car and removing the wheels .bottom line changing pads on the closed front caliper is more involved not necessarily difficult but tedious. Carl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Well, I can attest to the fact that the fronts are a real PITA! Have a DE event coming up this week and did a dry run on replacing the front pads today since I wanted to take my time and figure out all the nuances before I got to the track. Some important things I found out:

1. You should buy another set of brake sensors to put on your track pads (if you care about the warning lights) as it is non-trivial to get the sensors off the stock pads.
2. To get the stock pad off that has the sensor, you need to remove the spring (so the connector can get through the top), which is relatively straight forward to take off (with a flat edge screwdriver), but care should be taken putting it back on (I used some pliers with some cardboard on the top side so it would not scratch the caliper paint).
3. Should take off the ABS sensor (as mentioned above) to avoid undue stress.

So, just ordered another set of brake sensors, likely won't be in before my event, so, looks like another track day with stock pads.
 

·
Caymudgeon
Joined
·
710 Posts
Well, I can attest to the fact that the fronts are a real PITA! Have a DE event coming up this week and did a dry run on replacing the front pads today since I wanted to take my time and figure out all the nuances before I got to the track. Some important things I found out:

1. You should buy another set of brake sensors to put on your track pads (if you care about the warning lights) as it is non-trivial to get the sensors off the stock pads.
2. To get the stock pad off that has the sensor, you need to remove the spring (so the connector can get through the top), which is relatively straight forward to take off (with a flat edge screwdriver), but care should be taken putting it back on (I used some pliers with some cardboard on the top side so it would not scratch the caliper paint).
3. Should take off the ABS sensor (as mentioned above) to avoid undue stress.

So, just ordered another set of brake sensors, likely won't be in before my event, so, looks like another track day with stock pads.
Most everyone who installs track pads is tying the sensors back rather than installing them in the track pads. Since you have the skills to swap brake pads, you know enough to check pad thickness visually rather than relying on sensors. The pads are all pretty much in plain view and the sensors are a nuisance as you have already observed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Yep... that was my approach with my 987... and probably will do the same for my 981...
I still am thinking of doing the first track day with OEM pads and high temp fluid... then get some track pads (PS29/PS14 are being hyped as the best, should be for their prices) .. and probably do the studs vs replacing bolts every swap.
D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Most everyone who installs track pads is tying the sensors back rather than installing them in the track pads. Since you have the skills to swap brake pads, you know enough to check pad thickness visually rather than relying on sensors. The pads are all pretty much in plain view and the sensors are a nuisance as you have already observed.
Agree, just to clarify are you guys tying back the sensors full time, even for your stock pads? I ask because the connector for the sensor (the one connected to the stock pad) is hard to pull through the top of the bracket when the spring is still in place, so, I had to pull the spring, which, while not overly difficult to put back on, is not something I care to spend time on during track days....so, is everyone just leaving a sensor, disconnected from the stock pads, tied back full time so you never need to deal with it?
 

·
Caymudgeon
Joined
·
710 Posts
Agree, just to clarify are you guys tying back the sensors full time, even for your stock pads? I ask because the connector for the sensor (the one connected to the stock pad) is hard to pull through the top of the bracket when the spring is still in place, so, I had to pull the spring, which, while not overly difficult to put back on, is not something I care to spend time on during track days....so, is everyone just leaving a sensor, disconnected from the stock pads, tied back full time so you never need to deal with it?
I leave mine tied back full time. I'll probably re-insert them if/when I sell the car.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
UPDATE...

I finally got around to installing the purchased PAGID RS29/14's on my Cayman GTS. OK, I had to fight to get through the first "front" corner. What I learned, thank you school of Hard Knock's, is that you have to disconnect the pad sensor wires from its plug on the upright, then yank out the sensor from the pad BEFORE un-mounting the caliper. I was fighting with a couple loose pads that couldn't get disconnected from the sensor wire. So, order of attack:
1. disconnect the pad sensor wire from its mount on the upright,
2. with a needle-nose pliers, grab the outside sensor and pull off the pad.
3. unbolt the caliper mounting bolts and dismount the caliper
4. press the outside pad up against its holding spring and then off the retaining studs.-- the pad then just falls in your hand!
5. move the pad sensor wire off its mount on the retaining spring
6. press the inside pad up against its holding spring and then off the retaining studs and the pad falls into your hand.
7. dismount the pad sensor from the inside pad.
8. zip tie the sensors together and re-install in its plug, zip tie the sensor wire(s) to the ABS wire... to keep the wires out of the way for the Pagid pads.
9. installing the new pads in the calipers is pretty simple, just force them up against the retaining spring and snap onto the retaining studs..
10. Spread the pads so they can fit over the disc.
11 --- I had installed brake caliper stud kits rather than install new caliper bolts.
Remount the caliper on the upright, torque to 54 ft-lbs and the corner is good to go.

Following this sequence, I was able to do the other front corner in less than 20 minutes (adjusted for the stud kit installation).

Hope this helps another DYI'er.
Don
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
2,467 Posts
Great stuff here. By the way of you need PFC pads, we are fully stocked on 986/7 and 981 F&R of 08 & 11 compounds!
Motorsport_PFC.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
I have never changed brake pads. Without a video (unless someone can provide a link), how hard would it be for me to change the front pads on my 2015 CGTS?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
they have the same brakes as metioned above...

lemon
Yes, and there are is a very nice instructions written out. But when I don't even know what some of those things are, it might make learning the process a bit harder, hence, the question. How much harder or is there a video?
 
1 - 20 of 96 Posts
Top