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Has anyone found a source for the metal clips that hold the brake pad sensors in without having to buy new sesnors too? Flipping between track pads and street pads I've had two of them fall back out and I'd prefer not to have to redo the sensor.
 

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Has anyone found a source for the metal clips that hold the brake pad sensors in without having to buy new sesnors too? Flipping between track pads and street pads I've had two of them fall back out and I'd prefer not to have to redo the sensor.
They're not meant to be removed so getting them out without ruining them can be tricky.

Just stop using them. If you're swapping pads often, you're obviously going to notice when they're getting worn down. If you decide to stop checking, either put the sensors back in or just keep vigilant like you would with any other car without sensors on it.
 

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Has anyone found a source for the metal clips that hold the brake pad sensors in without having to buy new sesnors too? Flipping between track pads and street pads I've had two of them fall back out and I'd prefer not to have to redo the sensor.
Just loose them. Simplest procedure ever. Cut the wire as far from the caliper as practical, connect the two wires inside together, shrinkwrap, ziptie to something so it's solid. Done. I did it first time I changed brake pads. Those sensors are invented for people who go 90K miles without checking the pads... And obviously deaf too, because when pad is gone to none - you WILL hear it :) For the rest it's just nuisance and wasted time and money every time you change pads.
 

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And obviously deaf too, because when pad is gone to none - you WILL hear it :)
I'm not sure that's true.

If you cut the sensors off, you DO need to check the pads yourself now and then.

I don't think the pads have squealers on them.

That horrible screeching noise you're used to on other pads doesn't happen because the pads are used up and are now just metal backings screeching against the rotors. That would be dangerous.

Those pads have a piece of metal attached to them that overhangs the edge off the pad material. When it comes in contact with the rotor (which it does while there is still a safe amount of brake pad material remaining) it will screech like a banshee and that's your warning that you need new pads.

Since these cars have the sensors, which provide a more civilized warning system, I don't think they actually have the squealers on them.
 

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pads are used up and are now just metal backings screeching against the rotors. That would be dangerous.
That's exactly what I meant. That would be dangerous for people who go 90K miles without looking at break pads. As OP states that he changes pads often for track - that's not the case here.
 

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Even though these pads don't have the little metal warning/squeal device, they do make noise when they get down to the end. Mine still had the stock pads on the front, and while the sensors hadn't quite triggered yet, the pads were starting to make a very high pitched squeal when applying the brakes. If you are doing your own maintenance or swapping out pads for track days and are inspecting the rotors and pads with any regularity, I'd recommend keeping the sensors out of the pads and zip tie them off. Or clip them, solder and wrap the wires in heatshrink tubing and then secure them with zip ties. The sensors aren't expensive but if you're staying on top of inspections, why bother with them?

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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The sensors aren't expensive but if you're staying on top off inspections, why bother with them?
Suncoast sells them for $68 a pair.

I find that expensive. :)

I know you can get cheaper aftermarket ones but it's still a lot of money to pay for what it is. I'm quite happy to do without and save both the money and the aggravation. :)
 

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Suncoast sells them for $68 a pair.

I find that expensive. :)

I know you can get cheaper aftermarket ones but it's still a lot of money to pay for what it is. I'm quite happy to do without and save both the money and the aggravation. :)
Yes, it's very expensive considering what it is - piece of metal surrounded by plastic, with two wires. Still more importantly for me, removing them makes life simpler.
 

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Suncoast sells them for $68 a pair.

I find that expensive. :)

I know you can get cheaper aftermarket ones but it's still a lot of money to pay for what it is. I'm quite happy to do without and save both the money and the aggravation. :)
I agree. I was looking at Pelican Parts and they were $8 or $16 a piece for OEM supplier brands, or $48 each for Porsche labeled sensors. I was referring to $8 or $16 sensors as not being expensive. $68 or $96 a pair is crazy for what they are! I'm all for less expense and aggravation while working on the car. I don't mind working on it, but I'd much rather be driving it.
 

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Someone told me the Porsche rear brake pads are tricky to replace because of the electric e-brake, and that you shouldn't manually push in the rear caliper piston as it will mess up the e-brake system.

any truth to this?
 

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Discussion Starter #92
I saw something about this, but that was for replacing rear "rotors". There is nothing to do with the e-brake to replace rear pads.. The process is identical to the 987 rear brakes.. just search for rear pad change articles.. Honestly, very easy.
D
 

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Someone told me the Porsche rear brake pads are tricky to replace because of the electric e-brake, and that you shouldn't manually push in the rear caliper piston as it will mess up the e-brake system.

any truth to this?
Not sure who your source was, but I swap pads out about 12 times a year for track duty, and have replaced rotors several times. There are no problems using a standard el-cheapo pad spreader to push in calipers.

Also the Porsche brakes are about the easiest brakes I've ever worked on. The rear brakes are especially easy. One cotter pin and a slide bolt and they practically pop right out. It takes longer to get the wheel off than to swap pads.

DO NOT put your brakes in service mode to change rear pads or rotors! Personal experience. They would not come out of service mode and caused significant issues. I had to have controller replaced because they would not recalibrate. I personally think there is a firmware defect in the brake controller. I've know several people have had this same problem. Putting the brakes in service mode is not necessary for either a pad or rotor change under normal circumstances.
 

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Someone told me the Porsche rear brake pads are tricky to replace because of the electric e-brake, and that you shouldn't manually push in the rear caliper piston as it will mess up the e-brake system.

any truth to this?
That is how it is on my 2018 Mazda. The caliper pistons can't be pushed (and I tried hard). It has to be screwed in instead. Not difficult, but very unexpected. Costed me two hours till I decided to google what the hell is going on.
 

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+1 on no problems with pushing in the pistons.

Thanks on the service mode warning. just want to make sure I understand by "service mode" you mean the "Electronic Parking Brake System Maintenance activation/deactivation"? I just picked up on icarsoft because my cresetter2 didn't have this feature - haven't used it yet.
 
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