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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just finished changing the oil for the first time on our 2009 Boxster. I thought I'd post this because there are differences from the 987 Gen 1 cars.

First of all, and most annoying, is that Porsche moved the oil filter location to a much more inconvenient spot than it is on Gen 1 cars. On Gen 1 cars the filter was in the most convenient location it could be and still be under the car. Here's a shot of the Gen 2 location. Note that it is now more difficult to remove the canister without getting oil on various chassis components:



The required filter wrench is the same size as Gen 1, and an 18" extension bar makes it easily accessible.

The oil filter itself is a different size, and is considerably larger, length-wise. The new part number is: 9A1-107-224-00

You should also note that the Gen 2 engine takes very slightly less oil that the Gen 1 engine, at least comparing Boxster to Cayman. (I don't have access to a Gen 2 Cayman owners manual.) The Gen 1 Cayman S capacity is 2.05 US gallons, while the Gen 2 Boxster engine's oil capacity is 1.98 US gallons.

Other interesting notes, Porsche apparently stopped using the corrosion-resist coating on the new engine. On our cars this tends to support my theory that this coating was the cause of suspect odors from Gen 1 cars when you got them hot. Our Gen 2 Boxster gives off no such odors, but the Gen 1 CS still does. Not definitive by any means, but interesting data points.

I also noted the elaborate sensor (a VW -Audi part) and oil pan retention cable. Nicely done, but why bother?

 

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nice pics...tanks....why the oil pan cable ?
 

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There's also a cable attached to the engine on the Gen 1 CS, though in a different location. Bit of a swag but I suspect it is part of controlling where the engine goes in the event of a collision. Making it do something like go under as opposed to into the passenger compartment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There's also a cable attached to the engine on the Gen 1 CS, though in a different location. Bit of a swag but I suspect it is part of controlling where the engine goes in the event of a collision. Making it do something like go under as opposed to into the passenger compartment.
I can't dispute anything you say with facts, but it's difficult to believe those little screws holding the cable to the oil pan would hold during the force of an impact.
 

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Here's a picture of the Gen 1 safety tether cable - it does look like the bracket on the newer version could just tear out of the pan, but I'm guessing that the Porsche engineers have tested it to make sure it does what it's supposed to.

 

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Yep, I've no hard facts either. As I said a swag. Typically when dealing with these kind of forces the intent isn't to hold tight so much as it is to absorb, disipate, redirect etc. Hence crumple zones instead of rigid bodies. My guess is that in a rear end collision this cable serves to redirect the engine/transaxle beneath the cabin. Once the engine is pulled downward it won't matter if the cable holds or not. Having it shear in a controlled fashion will absorb some of the energy. All to keep it from ending up in your lap.
 

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I've seen a Boxster up on a life after a relatively mild rear end collision and that cable was pulled completely tight. No more little loop on it. It has stuck in my mind all these years until this thread came up.
 

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Hi Blueone, hopefully a quick question, what jacking points and Jack stand points did you use to lift your car? Need to change the oil on my 2009 boxster as well!

Many thanks for the great pics
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I use a drive-on lift for oil changes. Unfortunately, the lift points and the jack stand points on the Cayman and the Boxster are one in the same.

There are some relatively inexpensive alternatives for lifts, and if you PM me I'll send you some websites with alternatives. (Neither are sponsors of this site.)

If you do a search you can find descriptions of getting the car up on jack stands by using a floor jack to lift one entire side of the car at a time, but I admit that would make me too nervous, so I don't personally recommend that method, but I've read of people on this forum doing it.

Many folks use drive-on ramps for oil changes, and either use the slope of their driveways to get the car mostly level, or they just live with the angle of the ramps leaving some oil in the pan.
 

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Hi All,

Today I just changed the oil on a new-to-me 09 Boxster S. It has only 20k miles, and is generally in great condition. It has been in storage for the last 2 years or so. I unfortunately don't have detailed service records, but I do know (via carfax) that at 4300, 7800, and 12000 miles, the oil was changed at the Porsche dealer. I was told by the PO that he just changed it at 19000 miles in June. Since there were no records, I decided to do a change myself- it's easy to say you've changed the oil, but talk is cheap.

The oil did not look too bad - I think he may have been telling the truth. However, he used the wrong (shorter) filter. Which I believe means that for some period of time, the car was essentially driven with no filter.

How concerned should I be? Is there anything I should do at this point?
 

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Nice catch. I wouldn't lose a minute's sleep over this.

When I was in college, I made a summer road trip in an old Nissan Stanza. I had the oil changed at a Wal-Mart in Arizona. I drove the car 1000 miles the next day before I checked the oil level. It turns out Wal-Mart had overfilled the crank case by 2 full quarts!

The car remained in my family for ten more years, and I was always expecting an engine failure. It never happened. My point is, most of what we worry about never actually happens. Enjoy your new car.
 
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