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Hi All, UK potential buyer here!

I've been considering a Gen1 Cayman most likely the 2.7 because i've heard about the the engine failure issues with the S and from what i've read it either doesnt happen or is a hell of alot less likely with the 2.7 also the running costs should be a fair bit less.

The thing is i would be spending around 15k on a Gen1 2.7 with somewhere between 40-70k miles but im worried about high mileage i know its one of those things where anything or nothing could go wrong and no car is perfect but i just want to know everything when it comes to potential issues and what i might need to replace because its a big investment on a higher mileage car.

Basically i need you guys to give me the confidence to take the leap :p they look and sound so damn nice haha :D
 

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Go for it.

What issues are you referring to on the S?
 

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there is only one issue with gen 1 caymans, either 2.7 or 3.4 doesn't matter, but only if you plan to track the car. If its just going to be driven exclusively on the street there is nothing to worry about. Unless you take high banked left handers on the street where the oil gets pooled away from the oil pickup ;)
 

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Did a fair amount of research before purchasing my 2007 CS. I went for it because the problems to which you probably refer are very rare and I'm unlikely to drive it hard enough to run a risk. Don't worry unless you're going to track it. That said, if the extra ponies in the S don't appeal to you in any way, then you can save some money on a base... But be sure you won't regret it first :)

On a separate note, just be sure to have whatever car you will be purchasing checked out by a reputable mechanic. You never know how the previous owner(s) drove so it's a good idea to check for overrevs.
 

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a couple of observations from my own research.
Low mileage means ziltch if there are no maintenance records.
First year forward for a 987 it has a different IMS bearing, that has a much less chance of failure than the 986. (3.4 or 2.7 motor)
If the car was never tracked or AX, your chances of a IMS failure/oil starvation reduce greatly. If you're not planning on tracking the car, IMS faliure occurs even less.
Change your oil twice a year, or just more often than what they recommend.
 

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have a PPI done, but after that, go for it. I have an '07 CS and drive it like I stole it EVERYDAY. As posted above MAKE SURE you are OK w/ the power of the base, because like many on here you'll be looking at modifications to increase performance otherwise. Hell, even in the S, we're looking for performance increases all the time anyway. You only live once. DO IT!!
 

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OP - if the problems you are referring to are bore scoring, then it is the 3.4S that is the most prone. This is by no means wide spread, but it is nonetheless an acknowledged issue. The 2.7 is by far the safest option with regards to this problem, but as already stated drive both first as the 2.7 has to be wrung out to get the best from it. If you decide to go for a 3.4, have a boroscope done before you buy for peace of mind.
 

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And "running costs" are basically the same for the 2.7 vs the 3.4 for the maintenance items; the only differences will be fuel consumption, insurance, and frequency of tire changes.
 

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I had a 2.7. It was a lot of fun to drive because the 2.7 has a decent amount of torque.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the quick replies its greatly appreciated!

What issues are you referring to on the S?
IMS, RMS and bore scoring are the major ones as far as i'm aware.

And "running costs" are basically the same for the 2.7 vs the 3.4 for the maintenance items; the only differences will be fuel consumption, insurance, and frequency of tire changes.
I would have though there would be a bigger difference between running costs due to different wheels (although i'd prefer to get the S ones), brake discs/pads and im sure there are a few other difference between the CB and CS as far as parts are concerned.

I think theres a CB and CS just near me so i'm going to try get both of them test drove ASAP. Just for reference at the moment its between a cayman and a Honda S2000 at the moment the reason the Cayman is winning is because flat 6 just sounds like your destroying the world behind you :p But the price is the scary thing!

I am going to search here and google running costs right now but if people wouldnt mind could you give me examples on what i would expect to replace on an annual basis?

Once again, thanks a lot for the responses.
 

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Thanks for all the quick replies its greatly appreciated!



IMS, RMS and bore scoring are the major ones as far as i'm aware.



I would have though there would be a bigger difference between running costs due to different wheels (although i'd prefer to get the S ones), brake discs/pads and im sure there are a few other difference between the CB and CS as far as parts are concerned.

I think theres a CB and CS just near me so i'm going to try get both of them test drove ASAP. Just for reference at the moment its between a cayman and a Honda S2000 at the moment the reason the Cayman is winning is because flat 6 just sounds like your destroying the world behind you :p But the price is the scary thing!

I am going to search here and google running costs right now but if people wouldnt mind could you give me examples on what i would expect to replace on an annual basis?

Once again, thanks a lot for the responses.
Trikz:

I've owned my '06 CS since May of '09. If you look at my sig, you'll see a lot of mods. I've spent a good bit on the car doing things to make it mine. But you don't need to do much to really enjoy these.

1. If I were not going to make any mods, I'd still get an S for the extra torque.

2. The IMS issue is nearly moot with these cars. I track mine a couple times each year. No issues with the original IMS. I don't flog the car all day long at 100+F. I do track days in Spring and Fall only. I change oil after a track weekend.

3. If I don't do track days, I change oil between 5K and 10K (miles). I change more often if I take more short trips. Less often if a long highway trip consumes a lot of the miles. I've taken the car cross-country a couple times. What a hoot!

4. If I wanted to avoid cylinder scoring, I'd avoid storing the car with dirty oil in it and would especially avoid long storage after a series of very short trips...like backing the car in and out of the garage. Before you store any car, drive it for at least 30 minutes, enough to get the whole engine and all the components up to temp. This vaporizes water in the exhaust system, the engine block and even the transaxle. Porsches are made to be used every day. If you don't do that, store them properly. Clean oil and a long drive before putting it away. (clean doesn't mean not running the engine after changing. It means not very much of that black stuff that builds up in used oil. Elements of that stuff can eat away on things, especially when combined with water from condensation inside the engine that can occur when you store the car in a garage that changes temps. My garage is heated to 45F or so in winter. I think that really helps with longevity and avoiding problems.

5. If you don't track your car, you can pretty much drive the snot out of it with no side effects. There are exceptions...like, if you're in love with taking long "cloverleaf" expressway exit ramps over and over at the limit of adhesion of the tires...Something like that might cause oil starvation in an unmodified Gen 1 engine. If you feel insecure about that, buy a "deep sump" from Mantis or LN Engineering. Not difficult to install (or expensive to have installed) and it will give your sump an extra liter or two of oil (mine holds 10 quarts now with a Mantis sump. I think, for a non-track person, that would be enough for even the most heinous street antics.

You have to remember, when you're on track day event, you're pushing the car as hard as possible on a known piece of road for 20 minutes at a time. That's full power, followed by full brakes followed by turning as hard as possible followed by full power. Repeat endlessly. It's a ton of fun, but it's hard on things if they're not set up for it.

It costs a good bit to prepare a Gen 1 Cayman for track-rat duty. Some people just throw the go-fast things on and try their luck. These are the ones that end up on our forums with blown Gen 1 engines. BTW, Gen2 and later Caymans are not prone to any of these failures. This is why the price for used Caymans takes a sharp bump skyward beginning with the '09 cars.

6. One big plus with these cars is their corrosion resistance. I've driven my car throughout the winter since I bought it. There is still no corrosion underneath and it looks new under there. How cool is that?

7. I would look favor a Gen 1 with Sport seats...The ones with the bigger bolsters. You don't need Sport Buckets if you don't track (I like them, though), but larger bolsters than the base seats are really nice. They work better at holding you in. My S.O. THANKED ME when I put in seats with better bolsters. The stock seats are decently comfortable, but you have to hold yourself in the seat when you turn. If there were ever a car that you want side bolstering on a seat, the Cayman is it. As you become used to the car, you begin to realize what a joy it is to turn and your corner speeds will increase. So, if you find one with sports seats already in it, that would be ideal.

8. No real maintenance surprises for me, a ex BMW geek. Keep the fluids relatively clean, do the stuff at 40K miles (plugs and check the insulators on the individual coils), use good quality fuel and learn the eccentricities of the car...There are many and they are well-documented here in FAQS. Read the manual. You will learn things. These cars aren't normal.

I've got 83K+ on my car now and it runs like a top. Drove it about 250 miles yesterday.

Oh, if you get a car with Bose System, check out Articles on this site and search for Bose Subwoofer. There is a cheap, easy mod you can do to the subwoofer that will increase your listening enjoyment by 10 times or so.

:cheers:
 

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Trikz

Obviously running costs will vary quite a bit depending on your intended use of the car, will it be your Daily Driver or more of a Weekend car?

Do you plan to have your car looked after by an OPC or an Indy Porsche setup?

It's good to know that your doing your homework, Planet 9 is a great place to learn a whole lot of info, a helpful and knowledgeable crowd.
 

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Trikz

Obviously running costs will vary quite a bit depending on your intended use of the car, will it be your Daily Driver or more of a Weekend car?

Do you plan to have your car looked after by an OPC or an Indy Porsche setup?

It's good to know that your doing your homework, Planet 9 is a great place to learn a whole lot of info, a helpful and knowledgeable crowd.
Trikz:

A good independent shop not far from you is a VERY good thing to have when buying any car several years old. Develop a good relationship with a good shop near you. Their motivation is to keep you coming back...and that means being happy with your older car. Porsche dealers around me don't really relish working on older cars. They do mostly warranty work on newer ones and dealer prep. They love selling new ones. When I go in, they're asking me about "trading up".

I love my car. Why would I want to trade it? My independent garage understands this and they know me and my car. I've had them install mods and do experimental alignments etc as well as regular maintenance. It's a beautiful thing!

:cheers:
 

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Sixisenuff, great posts!
 

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Sixisenuff, great posts!
Honestly if i could fit in an s2000 and was going to track it that is what i would get. I cant even shut the door and get my knees between the steering column at 6 2. A guy brought one to the San Diego PCA autox and gave me a ridr. By far the fastest ride i got that day.

He said he missed a shift on the track and since the rpms didnt go that high he calculated the rpm at speed and gear and the engine took 16,000RPM without grenading, good luck with that on a Cayman. Hondas s2000 are cheap and reliable and handle great
 

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Honestly if i could fit in an s2000 and was going to track it that is what i would get. I cant even shut the door and get my knees between the steering column at 6 2. A guy brought one to the San Diego PCA autox and gave me a ridr. By far the fastest ride i got that day.

He said he missed a shift on the track and since the rpms didnt go that high he calculated the rpm at speed and gear and the engine took 16,000RPM without grenading, good luck with that on a Cayman. Hondas s2000 are cheap and reliable and handle great

S2000 = No torque below 5,000. Wind em up and they're fun. Didn't realize leg room was so poor on them. Did you have the seat all the way back? Are you sure?

:cheers:
 

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The fact that the 987.2 cars have no IMS is a great selling point especially if you do not aim to own it forever. Though the IMS spectre is probably overstated, you would have quite the job to convince your prospective buyer that IMS won't be one additional catastrophic failure he may inherit. Biases don't have to be logical, especially when they are the ones with cash in hand.
 
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