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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would like to know if anyone else has encountered this problem. I took my 2008 CS to the dealer for AX alignment and gave him the settings I wanted. To make a long story short when they went to align the rear the camber adjustments did not make any difference. I watched even as two mechanics adjusted each side and the Hunter alignment did not show any change. Had the same problem with the toe in.

The alignment settings requested where as follows:
Front Camber: maximize negative hoping to achieve at least -1 degree. Requested that both sides be adjusted to the same negative camber.
Front Caster: Maximize as much as the adjustments would allow. Again both sides to be the same.
Front Toe: I know toe out would give me the best turn in, but did not to sacrifice driveability on the road. 1/32 to 1/16 per side. Again both sides equal.
Rear Camber: 1.5 to 1.7 degrees.
Rear Toe: 1/16 per side
Rear Caster: Leave stock, but both sides being the same.

The dealer wants to disassemble the rear stucts to see if there is any damage or is it a problem from the factory. They also contacted the factory and there response was if they find a problem that is a factory defect or error they will pay for it otherwise I foot the bill. Bought the car from the Prosche dealer with 1500 miles on the car. They traded another Prosche dealer for it. I fell very uneasy about this.

Has anyone had a similar problem? Does anyone have any drawing or photos the rear struct assembly so that I can be more familiar with it when talking to the dealer? Any help is appreciated.
 

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Hi rjk,
The phenomena you described (camber and toe adjustments not affecting) is not possible assuming everything is properly assembled, and the adjustments are over a broad range. I suspect something was wrong with the alignment machine or its setup.

This dealer should be ashamed.

The problem has nothing to do with your struts. The camber adjustments are accomplished via control-arm-pivot bolts that have eccentric washers - rotating the bolt causes the pivot, and attached control arm / strut / wheel / etc to move in and outboard. The rear toe adjustments are via a similar eccentric moving the toe link.

Your requested alignment settings look good - except note that caster is not adjustable on these cars.

Good luck, and let us know how you get on. I would not trust the mechanics or advisor related to this diagnosis.
 

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The toe and camber at the rear are adjusted via the lower control arm and toe link. AFAIK the strut doesn't have much to do with it. If they want to check something, it seems to me they should be looking at the 'eccentric bolt' adjusting mechanism that is used for each.

Did you see what they were adjusting, or at least where on the car the adjustment was located?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you Jeff G and Dave D.

The dealer does want to disassemble the rear struct, but if they don't find anything wrong I pay the bill and the car is no better off. I was acturally thinking of taking it to another alignment shop familar with caymans. I am in the Philadelphia area and not that familar with the Porsche shops. It has been about 20 years since I owned my last Porsche. If anyone knows of a good shop in the Philly area please let me know.
 

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The front camber is adjusted by moving the top of the strut within the slotted holes at the top mount. It is unlikely that you could get -1.0 camber, -.7 is about it. Rear camber is per Dave D's previous post. The strut has nothing to do with it. A good Porsche tuning shop in SE PA is Dougherty in West Chester. I recently had some alignment work done at Don Rosen in Conshohocken and it came out as expected.
 

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3 possibilities.

1) The car was previously aligned at a shop with no experience, the rear tires were placed on a fixed surface and the shop tried to adjust toe and camber with the eccentric bolts. This will damage the subframe and the car won't get any change. Expensive repair bill.

2) The dealer is trying to adjust camber and toe, and the car is sitting on a flat fixed surface, or the surface has rollers to move in two axis but it has too much friction. Similar to #1.

3) The 18mm nuts for the camber and toe eccentric bolts are not loose enough, forcing the movement of the 19mm eccentric bolt will damage the subframe as well.

1, 2 and 3 cause damages to the subframe, and the fix is a new subframe.

I do my own alignment, renting the Hunter equipment from the tire shop, and with the help of a shop technician. I bring my tools, torque wrench, etc, and it has to be done properly.

First setup rear camber, then rear toe, then front camber, then front toe. I don't use distance unit of measures to determine angles (especially with the low resolution imperial system) I use degrees or minutes. Run 0 Toe front (easy for tire longevity) and 0.10 degrees toe-in per rear corner (0.20 degrees total). I run zero toe rear, but that requires sensitive hands for fast driving.

You're on the spot for camber.

Good luck.
 
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