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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading and am looking for the best alignment on my car. I do about 6-8 DE a year and daily drive the car. I want to keep the stock suspension so this is what I'm considering and would like your input.

Front per wheel: - 1.0 camber, .04 toe

Rear per wheel: -1.5 camber, .04 toe

Any suggestions? I'm not sure about caster. Ideally I want to keep it as close to stock as possible but am sick of eating the outside of my tires so fast.
 

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Cayman The Destroyer!
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Caster is not adjustable. You are lucky to be able to get -.5 in the front on a stock suspension. You really need camber plates to get adequate camber in the front
 

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Without PASM you might be able to get -.8 degrees camber in front; with PASM more like -1.0. More negative camber would be made available via camber plates, suspension lowering, or lengthening the camber adjustment slots; any of which would render the car no longer stock, but the first two methods are at least reversible. The last method is the cheapest and quickest, but is non-reversible.

As indicated above, caster is not independently adjustable, but it does change somewhat with other adjustments. More caster is desirable, but one just settles for what one gets after setting camber and toe.

Preferred toe settings are somewhat of a personal matter. Minimum toe-in for the front and about twice that amount in the rear is my own rule of thumb, but I noticed from my printout that I have .04 each side in front and .08 in the rear. Those are about in the middle of their respective spec ranges, so certainly nothing fancy there.

My car has PASM, so was able to get front camber set at -1.0 (LF) and -1.1 (RF) max, and rear camber as high as -2.1, but was last set at -1.8 each side. All settings are with me sitting in the driver's seat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, was only able to get -0.5 camber in the front. The strange thing is that he was able to get -0.9 on the driver side but only -0.5 on the passenger. Setting remained at -1.3 in the rear.

I will consider camber plates as I don't want to throw away tires constantly that would be good for a few more sessions otherwise.
 

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That much front camber difference side-to-side does seem unusual. Considering the number of track events you do, I think camber plates may be a good choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I suspect the tech wasn't very familiar with the Cayman S. I'll probably get my next alignment elsewhere.
 

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My first alignment at the Porsche dealer where I got the car new was far off. Although the screen and printout showed -1.0 on both sides, I could even tell by eyeball that the driver's side had only about half the camber as the other side. I went from there to my favorite independent shop to discover that cambers had been set at -.5 and -1.1. Toe settings were off as well. I informed the dealer about the bad alignment and they discovered that their Hunter alignment machine was out of calibration.

You'll have maximum negative camber when the strut top bolts are positioned as far inboard (toward the center of the chassis) as they will go in their respective slots.
 

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Boxster Browser
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I am running -0.75 degrees camber front and -2.0 degrees camber in the rear. This is the most negative camber I could get, although I do think one of the sides in the front could have been more.

I am wasting tires by wearing down the front outside edges too. Similar cars as mine report -2.5 degrees camber front with -2.0 degrees camber in the rear as good at the track and ok for daily driving too. It seems the best way to get this is the adjustable GT3 lower control arms which you can read about here:

http://www.planet-9.com/cayman-boxster-modifications/16158-installing-gt3-front-lower-control-arms.html
 

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Tennessee Vol
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I've been reading and am looking for the best alignment on my car. I do about 6-8 DE a year and daily drive the car. I want to keep the stock suspension so this is what I'm considering and would like your input.

Front per wheel: - 1.0 camber, .04 toe

Rear per wheel: -1.5 camber, .04 toe

Any suggestions? I'm not sure about caster. Ideally I want to keep it as close to stock as possible but am sick of eating the outside of my tires so fast.
I got -1.0 in front and -2.0 in the rear. Only changes are RSS bars and drop links. I had -0.9 in the front before the changes.
 

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I've been reading and am looking for the best alignment on my car. I do about 6-8 DE a year and daily drive the car. I want to keep the stock suspension so this is what I'm considering and would like your input.

Front per wheel: - 1.0 camber, .04 toe

Rear per wheel: -1.5 camber, .04 toe

Any suggestions? I'm not sure about caster. Ideally I want to keep it as close to stock as possible but am sick of eating the outside of my tires so fast.
I have just finished going through a set of tires (street and track) with nearly that setup (I'm -1.0 front, -1.6 rear) and have been very happy with the tradeoff. It is very acceptable for street, better than stock for the track, and, at end of life for the tires, hardly noticeable wear differences outside to inside.
 

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I'm running the stock PASM suspension with Tarret sway bars and drop links front and rear, GT3 control arms and camber plates. I've done a fair amount of track testing with a pyrometer and Nitto NT-01's 245/265 18's. My camber is -2.8 front, -1.8 rear and this is perfect for this car.

Probably the best test for this setup was my running with the Porsche factory drivers and the Boxter Spyder. They were running Michelin PS2's 235/265 with the PDK box and I passed them fairly easily in a couple sessions. I was even with them on straightline speed, but really outran them in the turns. I spoke to one afterwards and he was pushing it as hard as he could when I showed up in his rearview.
 

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Is changing the front camber to the max adjustment with stock components a DIY project? I don't find anything in the articles section. Thanks.
 

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If you can create a level surface, you could max negative camber by moving the top of the struts within their slotted holes to their max travel inboard. Using a framing square and basic trig, you could check that both sides have the same amount of camber. Once that was done you must correct the toe in. There is a least one article that describes this process. You could do it with strings set up parellel with the centerline of the car and a ruler. If you don't understand any of this, it is not a DYI project.
 
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