Planet-9 Porsche Forum banner

1 - 20 of 58 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a friends 2006 Cayman S up on the lift, dead battery, key in the ignition and I cannot open the front trunk.

Let me first say, I have read a bunch of posts on this subject. I have read the manual. I have read the 2008 amendment about removing the key but nothing works at this point.

What I have tried:

1. Trickle charging from the cigarette lighter with a battery maintainer.
2. Using a donor battery on the "pull out lead" on the interior fuse panel.
3. Using a "live" battery in a running vehicle in the same manner.
4. Using the 2008 "removing stuck key" amendment.

Nothing has allowed me to unlock the trunk. When I do have a power source hooked up to the fuse box, if I turn the key, I can hear what sounds like one relay clicking in the front of the car but no other lights or anything. The interior trunk switch does not work and pushing the button on the key lights up the key but does nothing to the car.

Since I thought the key may be disabled by being in the ignition, I have tried to remove it. But again, to no avail. I have removed the little "door" but when I turn the key all the way counter-clockwise i cannot insert either end of the rod any farther into the hole. If I look into the hole with a flashlight while turning I see no difference in the depth of the hole at any point in its rotation.

At this point I am fearing that there is a bad cell in the battery making it toast that has completely disabled the system but I am still at a loss as how to get to battery if this is the case.

In one of the other posts it was mentioned that there may actually be a mechanical release under the left fender. Can anyone confirm this?

Also can anyone that has actually removed the key with the supplied piano wire tool tell me if I'm doing something wrong? This car is a 2006 and the amendment didn't come out till 2008 I believe, I wonder if it even works with this car.

Any Suggestion?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
Sorry, I can't help on opening the front hood but can add a little info. When my battery recently went dead, jumping the battery would not work. Even leaving the jumpers attached for 15 minutes or so would not bring the old battery up in charge enough to let the engine crank. I had to remove the old battery and install a good one to get the car started.

I did a quick check of the factory manual, and it does mention a release lever inside the front trunk. I also see mention of a microswitch on the lever, so I'm guessing the release lever is electrical, which probably won't do you any good. It is located on the right side of the car behind the inner fender if you want to check it out.

Dave
 

·
Cayman Enthusiast
Joined
·
9,995 Posts
There is a mechanical release in the fender. Somewhere here is a detailed how to but in summary jack up the car, remove the left front wheel, remove the fender liner & you'll see the loop pull handle of the cable. But a better/cheaper solution might be 1-800-Porsche since it is still under warranty. It can be flatbedded to the nearest dealer and let them deal with a common problem. The battery may not be covered but the recovery should be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Ok Guys, Thanks for the help. I figured it out.

Santa Fe: Thanks. I read that post also. But people on it seemed to discount it and say it couldn't be. Just another case of people making assumptions without taking anything apart themselves I guess.

Schwabe: I searched in the articles section for all the key words but found nothing.

Here goes: (Maybe you can link this to the Articles section for future reference)

First, lift up the car.
Take off the left front wheel.
Remove the inner fender liner towards the front of the car. (T-25 torx and 10mm socket)

Then you will see this:


The little tiny wire tag is the manual release:


Pull this out, you should get about a foot of wire out of the grommit. I used a small adjustable wrench, clamped down on the bitter end and wrapped it around the handle of the wrench to get some leverage. You have to pull like heck, but after a while the hood will open I swear.



And just to let you know. There is no way that someone could just come up to your car and open the hood with this method in the parking lot. If, somehow, they could get their hand around the wheel and cut the fender liner. The wire requires so much force on it you really have to use a tool and both hands. No way you're doing that without it up in air.

HTH
 

·
Northeast Member
Joined
·
747 Posts
Nice discovery! Can I assume this would be the same on a Boxster? This wire is on the left, or drivers side? It must be different from the emergency release handle that is on the passenger side then.
Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Nice discovery! Can I assume this would be the same on a Boxster? This wire is on the left, or drivers side? It must be different from the emergency release handle that is on the passenger side then.
Dave
I don't have access to a 987 boxter but I assume that these parts of the car would be similar if not identical.

The wire is on the Left side (US driver's side).

From what I can tell this is in no way connected to the emergency release. The inside emergency release seems to be an electronic microswitch. At least that's what it sounds like when I pull the handle and listen to it. Also the cable that I believe I had then end of, appears to come into the latch from the left side of the car.

After looking at this I would caution you not to lock anyone in your trunk with a dead battery cause that handle's not going to work either. :eek:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,594 Posts
CheerIO,

Thanks for the write up. Just curious, what battery did you use as a replacement? Mine is an '06 and I'm thinking I should go ahead and just replace the battery.

-Moto
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
CheerIO,

Thanks for the write up. Just curious, what battery did you use as a replacement? Mine is an '06 and I'm thinking I should go ahead and just replace the battery.

-Moto
The battery is charging right now. So we don't know if we need a replacement as of yet. (My preference is to put Optimas in anything that will fit them.)

How did you reset the mechanism?
As near as I can tell, the cable releases the lock and when you push the hood back down it resets everything.

As an amendment to my above post about the internal microswitch: It seems to have two cables that are pulled when you actuate it. One coming from the right side of the car that pulls the safety latch out of the way. And it also seems to share the cable that comes from the left side of the car that unlocks the actual primary latch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
another way is alos to simply hook another battery (jumper cables work fine from another car) to the fuse box in the foot well. This allows you to release the front hood and access to your battery.
Shwabe, no offense dude....

But by reading your two posts on this thread, I am just wondering if you read my initial post at all. :hilarious:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Another way to do it is to make a jumper that powers both sides of a pulled fuse. I made one with a couple of blade electrical crimp connectors. Then pull the fuse that powers the hood release circuit and plug the jumper into boths sides. Dont forget to ground the battery to the chassis with the negative lead. I got enough power through this connection that everything came on imediatly so you should be able to remove the key if no then charge the battery and you should be able to remove it then.

I had to do this once so I know it works and a lot easier than pulling the wheel and the fender liner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Another way to do it is to make a jumper that powers both sides of a pulled fuse. I made one with a couple of blade electrical crimp connectors. Then pull the fuse that powers the hood release circuit and plug the jumper into boths sides. Dont forget to ground the battery to the chassis with the negative lead. I got enough power through this connection that everything came on imediatly so you should be able to remove the key if no then charge the battery and you should be able to remove it then.

I had to do this once so I know it works and a lot easier than pulling the wheel and the fender liner.
That's a really good idea. I will keep that in mind for next time. :cheers:

At this point the battery is looking in good health. If it is, I wonder why Porsche's solution does not supply enough power to be a real solution? :crazy:
 

·
Cayman Enthusiast
Joined
·
9,995 Posts
Another way to do it is to make a jumper that powers both sides of a pulled fuse. I made one with a couple of blade electrical crimp connectors. Then pull the fuse that powers the hood release circuit and plug the jumper into boths sides. Dont forget to ground the battery to the chassis with the negative lead. I got enough power through this connection that everything came on imediatly so you should be able to remove the key if no then charge the battery and you should be able to remove it then.

I had to do this once so I know it works and a lot easier than pulling the wheel and the fender liner.
I don't quite follow this. Pictures or a drawing? How do you ground the battery again?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
I used jumper cables hooked up to an extra batter and connected the negative lead to the chassis. Dont remember where.

To make the fuse jumper cable you need

o- Bolt
o- Large Crimp Loop
o- In Line Fues (you can use the fuse you pull out of the fuse panel)
o- Butt Crimp
o- Two short pieces of wire
o- Two male blade crimps

Asemble in the order of parts listed above. Also included a small picture of the one that I made. Costs maybe $4.00 in parts if that.

Probably trickle charger doesnt put out enough power to charge a dead battery or provide enough amps for the accessories. Not familiar with the other approach you call out that Porsche references.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
What is Porsche's rationale in not releasing the key when the battery is dead? This makes the driver to stay with the dead car. For other cars I can just lock it and deal with it later. With Porsche, if I walk away, there will be an unlocked car with the key inside. :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
What is Porsche's rationale in not releasing the key when the battery is dead? This makes the driver to stay with the dead car. For other cars I can just lock it and deal with it later. With Porsche, if I walk away, there will be an unlocked car with the key inside. :eek:
I completely agree with this. I can not think of a single reason that it is preferable to lock the key in the ignition.

Considering that her owner couldnt do anything, I doubt a thief would :D
Out side of taking everying in the glove box, center console, door pockets, and rear storage boxes...

I could have your steering wheel's airbag out in about 15 seconds. Pretty hefty haul if your a thief.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Another way to do it is to make a jumper that powers both sides of a pulled fuse. I made one with a couple of blade electrical crimp connectors. Then pull the fuse that powers the hood release circuit and plug the jumper into boths sides.
This sounds like a good idea and I understand the concept. I just can't find the correct fuse that would power the front hood latch.

The closed fuse that I can find from reading the fuse manual is:

Row C, F3: Front end Control Unit TRM15

I am only assuming this to be the one as Row A, F3 lists the Rear Control Unit TRM 30 and has Rear Lid Release under it as a sub set. Is this a correct assumption or do you use a different fuse?
 
1 - 20 of 58 Posts
Top