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So I went to the dealership for some minor work on my 08 Cayman. They insisted on a complimentary multi-point inspection and came back with this: http://imgur.com/KlZHTqR





Now it was my understanding that the IMS wasn't visible without dropping the transmission. How is it possible that they were able to determine that the seal was leaking through a basic inspection then? Do I have a cause for concern or am I getting fleeced here?
 

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Sounds like a fleecing to me. I'd make them show me how they determined it was leaking without dropping the tranny. Should be an interesting excersize on their part to explain/show how they arrived at that conclusion. If something is actually leaking, why not the RMS (rear main seal that's just above the IMS)? Why not anything else since they can obviously see through things.:cheers:
 

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They could see an oil leak below the IMS on the gearbox/engine mating area below - but to definitively say it's IMS not the RMS - well that's guessing.

Anyhow, the IMS leaks for everyone. So no need to rush and replace it. Do it when the clutch gets changed (if you have a manual)
 

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Like other posters have said, it could either be the RMS or the IMS seal but there will be no way to know for sure, unless they drop the tranny, which is expensive in itself, and at that time you might as well replace your clutch, RMS seal and IMS seal, and maybe flywheel, as you have already paid the labor and would only pay for parts. Nine out of 10 times it is the Rear Main Seal that is leaking. If you think your IMS bearing itself, is starting to go, you should probably check the class-action lawsuit page to see if your VIN number is included in the class, so this way part of the ultimate repair will be covered. AFAIK, Late 2005 through 2008 model years require the engine to be removed and dismantled in order to change the bearing, so removing the tranny and going through this exercise in futility, just to find out what's leaking, you would still not be able to perform an IMS bearing upgrade or retrofit, without a really great additional expense, and it makes no sense. Additionally the model years that I mentioned are said to only be affected by the IMS problems just 1% or less, so I wouldn't worry. Change your oil often, at least every six months or 5000 miles, use Porsche recommended oil, and drive it the way Porsche intended, keep the RPMs 2500 and above, and drive it like you stole it, and find another dealer or an Independent Porsche mechanic.

I have an early 2005 Boxster S (987) with 39,000 miles, and I had my IMS bearing upgraded and also had a leak repaired, that turned out to be the RMS, but at the same time I replaced the clutch, flywheel etc. The repair wasn't so bad, because the earlier models could have the bearing replaced while the engine was still in the car. They say the bearing failures on these earlier cars approach 10% so I felt it was prudently proactive for me to do the upgrade repair. It's really a shame that this IMS design flaw exists is such a great car. Porsche realized that, and the IMS was finally eliminated in model year 2009. Hope this all helps. Enjoy!
 

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I've read a recent thread on another Cayman forum where the car was found to have a leaking IMS seal. The rear main seal was fine. The newer design RMS seems hold up better than the earlier versions. YMMV. Perhaps the dealer technician was able to get a small bore scope in the hole.
 

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I've read a recent thread on another Cayman forum where the car was found to have a leaking IMS seal. The rear main seal was fine. The newer design RMS seems hold up better than the earlier versions. YMMV. Perhaps the dealer technician was able to get a small bore scope in the hole.
I have heard that as well that the new seal for the RMS is definitely improved. In fact when they replaced my RMS, they used an improved Cayenne seal and claimed it to be more durable and less apt to leak. It turned out that my IMS was not leaking and was in good condition, but while they were in there I had them replace it anyways with the LN retrofit hybrid ceramic kit. I did not know that they could get inside to take a look with a small Bore scope. Regarding your situation, If that was the case, then I may consider getting it done, but at the same time as a clutch and flywheel replacement. Now, if they are replacing the seal on the IMS, then they probably at that stage take a look at the condition of the bearing. I've read online that because the engine would need to be dismantled to actually replace the bearing, that people remove the seal of the actual bearing to facilitate better lubrication of the bearing and to prolong its life.
 

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Porsche987,
I'm gathering the tools to remove the IMS bearing seal when it is time to do my clutch......I have no leaks at the moment. I was speculating on the use of a bore scope to examine the IMS area.....

Rob
 

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Porsche987,
I'm gathering the tools to remove the IMS bearing seal when it is time to do my clutch......I have no leaks at the moment. I was speculating on the use of a bore scope to examine the IMS area.....

Rob
Definitely a good plan especially if you can see the actually bearing condition with the possibility of a scope.
The fact you have no leaks in the IMS seal is a good indication that the bearing seal has not been compromised and most probably the bearing has maintained its permanent lubrication, and therefore in good condition. A good time to remove the inner(?) seal for best overall lubrication.
 

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Just out of curiosity..........hypothetically, if a dealership records that they have diagnosed an IMS to be leaking and it is not repaired and then said bearing fails (within a 'reasonable' timeframe) and causes engine damage would there be any warranty implications?
 

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I guess it would depend upon what action they recommended. If, for example, they reported an IMS leak and stated it was relatively minor but required monitoring by them, so long as you followed that advice any claim should be covered. If on the other hand they advised immediate replacement and you chose to ignore that and the IMS bearing was to fail, you would without doubt have any claim rejected.
 

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Just out of curiosity..........hypothetically, if a dealership records that they have diagnosed an IMS to be leaking and it is not repaired and then said bearing fails (within a 'reasonable' timeframe) and causes engine damage would there be any warranty implications?
Do you have an extended warranty or a CPO WARRANTY?. If the car is a 2008, maybe or maybe not. Not mentioned in the post.

For all others with MY2001-MY2005, you can run you VIN on the IMS class action LAWSUIT page and see if it's included in the lawsuit.
If it is, and the failure occurs prior to 10 years 130,000 miles, part of the repair would be covered by Porsche.
Here is the link to the class action against Porsche and to lookup your VIN Number.
http://www.imsporschesettlement.com/porsche-vin/

***It should be noted that this lawsuit ONLY represents Model year 2001-2005, presumably when Porsche went back to using the less robust Single Row IMS Bearing. The 2008 referred to above uses a stronger more robust bearing with a much less failure rate of under 1% vs the 10% however in order for it to be replaced, the engine requires removal and dismantling.

In MY2009, the IMS was totally eliminated by redesign of the engine.
 

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Then again, under warranty, might as well do whatever the dealer recommends...its free. Sounds like OP is out of warranty.
 

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Then again, under warranty, might as well do whatever the dealer recommends...its free. Sounds like OP is out of warranty.
If it was under warranty, definitely should follow dealer recommendations. Nothing to lose.
Out of warranty, the OP can do what they please.
Me personally? I would get it repaired, and start fresh with a new clutch and flywheel. (which I did)
Nothing good could come of an oil leak, especially in the IMS area. It might just be a simple RMS seal.
Anyways, who wants oil all over their garage floor. Not me! :)
 

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I had a leak of a few drops a week under my 2007 Cayman S. The timing worked well for me as the pressure plate went limp a short time afterwards. I pulled out the transmission and removed the clutch and flywheel. What I found was a leaking IMS flange.

There was too much oil around the flange to tell if it was the large seal around the flange that was leaking or if it was the small o-ring on the end of IMS bearing shaft (this o-ring butts up against the flange to prevent oil from passing through the hole in the center of the IMS flange.

My RMS didn't seem to have any leaks. There was some oil in the area, but it might have migrated there from the leaks in the flange area. I replaced it anyway since I was already in there.

While I was in there I also imstalled the DOF (direct oil feed) as a way to preserve my IMS bearing. The process involved removing the front seal off the IMS bearing and installing a new IMS flange which has connects to an oil supply line. It was startling to find there was NO grease left on the ball bearings of the IMS bearing - just engine oil. Clearly the seal had been compromised. The bearing itself seemed fine so I continued with the installation of the DOF.

Regardless of where your leak is coming from (IMS flange or RMS) you might want to get them both replaced along with the clutch while you're in there.

Consider the DOF as well. Some will tell you our IMS bearings are fine and not to worry about them, but if the bearing does let go I don't imagine these same people are going to hand over $20k for the new motor we're going to need.
 

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migliore,

How was the installation of the DOF? Do you have any photos? I am already using the spare oil pressure port in the LHS cylinder head to monitor the oil temperature. At this time I don't see an easy way to do both oil temp and DOF....I was at least going to remove the bearing seal when my clutch needs replacement.

Rob
 

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Hi Rob.

i did take some photos, but I think the installation guide I received from TuneRS does an excellent job of detailing the installation. I have contacted them to see if they are okay with me uploading it here. Otherwise, I can email it to you.

I wonder if a t-adapter can be put together so you can have your oil temperature sensor and DOF oil feed at the same time.

Update:
Here's a link for the DOF install guide. http://shop.tunersmotorsports.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/DOF-Installation-Guide-1.pdf
 
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