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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if anyone is covering or blocking their air scoops for storage. Depending where you live and your storage situation, is it a fear that rodents may get into the air filters or tailpipe? Do you block these off somehow? Is there any special product on the market for this purpose?

Thanks in advance for your input.

Kevin
 

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Will there be power wherever you are storing it? If so, there are electronic pest control devices that emit a high frequency sound that discourages habitation. I swear it worked to rid us of some rats that got into the attic and walls one fall.
 

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Just wondering if anyone is covering or blocking their air scoops for storage. Depending where you live and your storage situation, is it a fear that rodents may get into the air filters or tailpipe? Do you block these off somehow? Is there any special product on the market for this purpose?

Thanks in advance for your input.

Kevin
Steel wool stuffed into the tailpipes will prevent critter getting into the exhaust system...blocking the intakes would prevent mice or other rodents building nests in that specific location. If there is a rodent problem where you are storing the car, I'd try and secure the location with a combination of sonic, traps, etc....or put the car in one of the inflatable bubbles. Last winter, a friend's 996 911 was assaulted by rodents...he didn't see what was happening until he opened the storage facility in the spring. The car was a write off.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys, I've heard those suggestions before and wondering if the electronic devices really work?

Also does any company make a fitted device for tailpipes or intakes?
 

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Thanks guys, I've heard those suggestions before and wondering if the electronic devices really work?

Also does any company make a fitted device for tailpipes or intakes?
Yes. The one I have has three settings for frequency and 3 levels of loudness. It has specific recommendations for rodents.
AFA steel wool - be aware that it should not be used in a high moisture environment. As boater I've known to never have it on a boat - rust stains are hard to remove.
Also, I don't understand why you'd worry about your exhaust. Nothing to eat in there and they can't do much damage. I'd be much more worried about your engine compartment which has lots of little hideaways for nesting, along with wiring harnesses for those late-night snacks. That thought would keep me up at night. No easy way to keep them out of there. So your safest bet is to repel them.

If you want to be non-electronic - just keep a cat in there - solved.
 

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Can you look the device you're using? Thx

Sent from my ONEPLUS A5000 using Tapatalk
Assuming your request was addressed to me - the one I have is very old. Guessing 25 yrs or so. So old it was "Made in the U.S.A." :) But I googled the mfgr Weitech and - low and behold - here it is https://www.ebay.com/i/322880841384?chn=ps&dispctrl=1

Well-made, all metal. At the loudest setting it'll drive you nuts. No wonder critters hate it.
 
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When living in Wisconsin, I always made sure my Porsche had plenty of rodent deterrents, after a bad experience the first Winter. Yes block intake and exhaust. But also use rodent traps and poison. I also used a box of mothballs above the engine compartment to discourage rodent ingress.
Equally damaging over long periods of storage is moisture ingress and corrosion inside the heads (some valves will be open when engine is off), and in the fuel tank. So whatever you use on the intake and exhaust sides should also prevent water vapor from condensing inside during inevitable temperature swings. These same temperature swings will also cause H2O condensation inside your fuel tank, proportional to the size of the air space within. So make sure your fuel tank is topped off, ensuring minimal airspace (and "breathing") inside the fuel tank.
This is what I'd do, but I'm an engineer and anal about this topic, after sustaining the damage my Porsche had early on...
 
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