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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, everyone!



got my car y-terday, will post pics soon.



but in the meantime i was wondering if i was the only one here who could possibly profit from other (more experienced drivers with maybe some tracktime) drivers driving technique tips?/fckeditor/editor/images/smiley/MWPX/lightbulb.gif



Since we all drive the same car, the tips would be easyly appliable.



So my first questions is: even though i have adaptive seats, and, sit really near to the steering wheel, when driving 'spirited' through the twisties, i kinda hold on to the wheel...with all the negative results.



any ideas?thanks!/fckeditor/editor/images/smiley/MWPX/thanks.gif



Nick
 

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Always keep both hands on the wheel. My mom used to tell me that when she taught me how to drive stick. Hope you get better advice from the other more experienced drivers here. And congrats on your delivery.
 

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Your local PCA club is the best source of hands on education with experienced teachers. Join the PCA, register your Cayman here and have fun. By the way most drivers just starting out enjoying their sports cars tend to hold the steering wheel too tightly. There is a balance between being relaxed and too firm with the grip.


Glad it has arrived!
 

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Santa Fe is quite right. Gripping too tightly will fatigue your hands to the point of discomfort. And you might want to sit further back from the wheel, with your arms fairly straight. Keeps the elbows away from the knees, as it were!
 

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Nick


The best answers to your questions are not on the internet, but in your car with a good high performance driving instructor beside you giving you personal guidance. Interested?


I don't know where you live, but I'd suggest you locate & sign up for a DE (Driver's Ed) weekend run at a nearby track by one of the national clubs with a chapter in your area. Preferably PCA, but the BMW& Audi clubs also have active DE programs.You'll learn how your car handles & become a safer, more secure & more capable street driver. You'll also be taughtproper seating & hand positions and, to top it off, you'llhave morefun that you can imagine. The focus is on learning & developing good driving skills, not trashing your car, breaking lap records or impressing anyone.Do yourself a favor & just sign up to do one DE weekend ...


Warning:participating in a DE event can be habit forming and may result in a chronic condition wherethose afflicted require regular doses of track time to prevent malaise.




Edited by - STLPCA on 08/11/2006 4:33:24 PM
 

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I disagree with straight arms. Close with bent arms means you can turn more without moving your body.



A suggestion/trick for getting tight in the seat is if you have power seats (can be done with manual but much easier with power - is adaptive automatically power?) is to move the seat back a little further than where you intend to sit. Get comfortable get your seat belt on snugly and pull on it to activate the 'lock/tensioning' then with it still 'locked' move the seat up with the power so that the seatbelt is 'tensioned' all the time and helps to keep you in the seat. This way you don't have to use the steering wheel to stay put.

Edited by - bet on 08/11/2006 4:30:34 PM
 

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As a general tip, you'll have proper distance from the steering wheel if, with the seat positioned properly for the pedals & your butt tight in the seat, your hand can be bent at the wrist over the topmost portion of the wheel. Adjust the wheel in or out as needed to achieve that distance.
 

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A few observations. First it isa BAD idea sitting too close to the steering wheel. If the air bag blows, you want some distance between you and the bag coming at you at a few hundred miles per hour. A lot of dainty ladies suffer severe facial fractures in accidents because they sat too close to a deploying air-bag. If you have normal physique, there is no physical need to sit up close to the wheel. May be a mental comfort thing that you think you see more of the road. Not true.


Both arms and legs should have a comfortable bend in it . The leg should be slight bent at the knee even when the brake or clutch padelis fully depressed. The grip should actually be a relaxed grip. A 'death-grip' makes it less smooth in steering the wheel.


A lot of people see race car drivers sitting like they are lying down in their F1 machines, and thus recline their seats in their 'sports' car to emulate this race position. In fact the seat back should be relatively up-right. That will assure proper arm length with the wheel. Also allows you the most forward vision as you are sitting higher. It does not look too cool, but it works best.


One little known factabout setting the side-view mirrors. Most of my adult life I set the side mirrors such that I see a quarter of the rear fenders (both sides). I went to the M5 Driving Experience (and subsequent events, MB AMG Challenege, BMW Car Control Clinics, etc.) and the instructors all said the same thing: When seated, the side mirrors should not show the rear fenders at all. Turn your head as if you are peering back during lane changes. At that point, the side mirrors should then show the edge of the rear fenders (same for passenger side). With the mirrors in these positions, you will practically eliminate your blind spots. When the cars on either sides actually disappear from your side-view mirrors, their hoods would already be in your peripheral vision as you glance sideways. Thus virtually no blind spots.


Good luck and enjoy your wonderful new toy.


CP
Edited by - CP on 08/11/2006 6:16:16 PM

Edited by - CP on 08/11/2006 6:17:25 PM
 

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Yep. As for seat distance, use this as a starting point: Adjsut the seat until you can use your RIGHT foot to depress the clutch with a straight leg (for an auto, put it on the floor behind the brake). That should give you enough extra space to be able to press it in all the way with your LEFT foot without locking your knee, and you know you'll be able to sink the brake to the floor if you had to. I had an instructor once that told me of a student that he had where the car just didn't seem to be stopping hard enough, even when the student was 'standing' on the brake. At first they thought it was the brakes, but after moving the seat up, the student realized that she wasn't pressing the pedal nearly as far as it would go, even though her leg was fully extended!
 

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One little known factabout setting the side-view mirrors. Most of my adult life I set the side mirrors such that I see a quarter of the rear fenders (both sides). I went to the M5 Driving Experience (and subsequent events, MB AMG Challenege, BMW Car Control Clinics, etc.) and the instructors all said the same thing: When seated, the side mirrors should not show the rear fenders at all. Turn your head as if you are peering back during lane changes. At that point, the side mirrors should then show the edge of the rear fenders (same for passenger side). With the mirrors in these positions, you will practically eliminate your blind spots. When the cars on either sides actually disappear from your side-view mirrors, their hoods would already be in your peripheral vision as you glance sideways. Thus virtually no blind spots.
This is what I do to set my side mirrors:



1. Sit in the driver's seat with the seat positioned exactly how you drive.



2. While looking forward, move your head to the left until it's bumping against the window.



3. Adjust the driver's side view mirror with your head in this position until you can barely just see the rear fender in the mirror.



4. Now move your head to the right as much as is comfortable, again while looking forward.



5. Adjust the passenger side view mirror in the same way, so you can barely just see the right rear fender.



That's it. Works like a charm for me. When there's a car in my rear view mirror that changes lanes to the right or left to pass, as soon as that car begins to move out of view of the rear view mirror it begins to show up in the side view mirror. Virtually eliminates blind spots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
thanks everyone!

further questions: when driving a corner what do you do with:



1.throttle until the apex: are you off the throttle or do you just keep it constant, starting to squeeze at (or just after the apex)?



2.steering: do you just find the right radius of the curve with the steering wheel, and then dont move it from that position until the road starts straightning, or do you make small adjustments to the radius?



cheers,



Nick
 

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Nick


Sorry, but you're just NOT going to learn performance driving sitting in front of your computer. Enroll in a pro school (PDE, Bondurant, Skippy, etc.) or a club DE & get 'in car' personal instruction. See my earlier post. You might also do some reading. One of my favorites isGoing Faster.


The answers to your very general questions are: it depends on the turn, it depends on your car & your tires, it depends on your speed, it depends on the conditions, &it depends on your skill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well i actually am going to attend a PDE (the voucher came with the car), but at the moment the only 2006 event is already booked out and 2007 events aren´t released yet....
 

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Ditto for recommending a high performance driving program. My wife & I did Bob Bondurant in '98 after my wife got her '98 993, then we went back with our cars after I got my '00 Boxster S, and now we've been to PCA DE's in her '04 Cayenne Turbo and my '06 Cayman S, and we're going back to Arroyo Seco for a DE in September. Besides the honing of driving skills (threshold braking, trail braking, throttle steering, reading the apex, tracking out, etc...) it's just too much dang fun to pass up 2 days on the track!!! As for reading material, you might benefit from Ross Bentley's SPEED SECRETS (volume 1 -- the others are more about team approaches, etc) to familiarize yourself with the vocabulary and concepts, but there's no substitute for seat time to learn the feel. Greg

Edited by - gemars on 08/17/2006 12:11:22 AM
 

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As somebody mentioned, PDE's aren't the only events out there with good instruction. I've done several BMW CCA events and been happy with the level of instruction they gave me, especially since I started as a novice. You don't need to have a BMW.


Also, I'm not very experienced, but my 2 cents: your throttle and turn-in questions will differ so much for your speed, the turn, the car, the road conditions/temp, etc., that the best way to learn is to do it.
 

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The rule of thumb in corners is:Brake, Turn, Gear, Go. Of course there's a bit of overlap, but get your braking done, initiate the turn, select the gear that's right for the exit of the turn, and by then it's time to nail it. Everycurve is different, and that's the beauty of it.
 
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