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Discussion Starter #1
What are your favorite products, why? Also please include any special procedures such as clay work or wax stripping needed for best results. Will be the first time the car has had anything other than carnauba applied to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think so, a lot are marketed as Ceramic waxes such as Griot's three blend quick wax containing SI O2. I'm looking for home applications only.
 

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Had good results with Turtle Wax ceramic products. I got Turtle Wax graphene products for Christmas, and am waiting for good weather to try them, but they have lots of good reviews.
 

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Sorry, can you clarify clear ceramic coatings
Or a wax that has some sort of infused ceramic properties.

There is a big difference.

This is
Wash
Clay
Wash
Polish
Carnuba

I've used a few dozen ceramic coatings and a few types of infused waxes.

Save your money.
Regular carnuba is cheap and deep.


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Synthetic: I tried Avalon King on my C-class, granted the finish was already perfect, but I tried it anyway... it looked great, but it was a 4-5hr event... waste of time. I prefer buffing out the car with 3M Finesse it, then I use simple old Maguire’s cleaner wax and the outcome is the same. I buff the cars out maybe once a year and just maintain with the wax listen above... it looks perfect and takes me 20-30 minutes total..
Synthetic is over rated and Imo didn’t last long at all
 

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Sorry, can you clarify clear ceramic coatings
Or a wax that has some sort of infused ceramic properties.

There is a big difference.

This is
Wash
Clay
Wash
Polish
Carnuba

I've used a few dozen ceramic coatings and a few types of infused waxes.

Save your money.
Regular carnuba is cheap and deep.


Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
Agree... I think the good old fashion wax is the best, but buffing is the key before that
 

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True ceramic coatings: Kamikaze Miyabi + Zipang maintained with Polish Angel Cosmic or High Gloss Spritz.

Coating 'Lite' (spray): Gyeon CanCoat

Hybrid ceramic/carnauba wax: Kamikaze Infinity, Polish Angel High Gloss Paste Wax

Sealant: Polish Angel Master Sealant + Rapidwaxx
 

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I agree with Schwinn on Wolfgang products. I am not an expert, I am not OCD about my paint, I like to spend more time driving and less time "waxing." I use Wolfgang "Paintwork Polish Enhancer" first with a dual-action machine, then use Wolfgang "Deep Gloss Paint Sealant" right after. Let cure 24 hours looks terrific and lasts at least 6 months with mild washes in between. I use this on all three of my vehicles with great results.
 
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Thanks everyone, I ordered the Wolfgang product. I'll do the truck first as a practice run.
Like SouthJerseyRider, I don't spend much time on this either... my friend does. That said, I'd love to hear what you find when you do this... always curious to hear other people's opinions on Wolfgang...
 

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For clarity:

All waxes, sealants, and coatings need proper prep before application for best adherence and look, else the products will not bond well. This would/could include a wash with a stripping soap (dish soap can work, not a gentle ph neutral soap), clay bar to remove contaminants bonded to clear coat, then compound/polish as required, then a second cleaning to remove residue before applying wax, sealant or coating. All wax/sealant/coatings require some maintenance. None are a perfect solution for every scenario.

Wax: Carnauba based product (a natural plant based wax). Wax has the least protection and typically lasts the shortest amount of time. Requires a lot of work upfront to apply and buff off. Anecdotally produces a 'deep wet look.

Sealant: synthetic compound that is generally easy to apply (wipe on walk away). Bonds chemically better to clear coat than wax. Generally provides longer protection than wax (4-6 months). In case of a product like Optimum Opti-Seal, it should NOT be applied over a wax, and they say NOT to wax over it as well. It needs to chemically bond to tje clearcoat, not a layer of slick wax. For products like Opti-Seal, you can easily maintain with frequent reapplication of product.

Coating: this is your 'ceramic' coating type products. I say ceramic as that is what they seem to be commonly referred to, but I don't believe that is chemically correct for all. These anecdotally have the strongest chemical bond to clear coat and are supposed to last the longest if you maintain them per the mfgr. These products seem to have the most hype and marketing (and command a steep price). I don't buy into the glossy brochures that claim years upon years of protection and gloss... Maybe for a garage queen out of the elements. There is also a lot of hype about new compounds like Graphene (oddly there is a lot of hype about the miracles of graphene in the battery industry too...). YMMV.

I don't know if I buy the hype of a 'hybrid' wax/coating either. Wax and sealant don't seem to go hand in hand if you want to ensure that the sealant chemically bonds to the clear coat.

I personally use collinite wax and Opti-Seal. Obviously not together at the same time. The minivan and truck I typically have done up with Opti-Seal, and the Cayman with Collinite. However, I just stripped and clayed the Cayman and put on opti-seal. It looks just as glossy and deep as the Collinite, and sheets water better and longer.

I also bought a bottle of Adams Graphene Detail Spray NOT because of 'graphene' but because it has received really good reviews as a detail spray independent of its use with their 'graphene' coating. I have really enjoyed using it so far.
 

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Coating: this is your 'ceramic' coating type products. I say ceramic as that is what they seem to be commonly referred to, but I don't believe that is chemically correct for all. These anecdotally have the strongest chemical bond to clear coat and are supposed to last the longest if you maintain them per the mfgr. These products seem to have the most hype and marketing (and command a steep price). I don't buy into the glossy brochures that claim years upon years of protection and gloss... Maybe for a garage queen out of the elements. There is also a lot of hype about new compounds like Graphene (oddly there is a lot of hype about the miracles of graphene in the battery industry too...). YMMV.
Nice bit of info from Feynlab regarding various coating 'chemistries' and nomenclatures: Coating Chemistries, and Differentiating Marketing Terms from Actual Chemistry | FEYNLAB

As for longevity claims, I guess they gotta come up with some measuring stick to put on the fancy brochures, usually and estimation based upon 'simulated' wash cycles likely done under the best of conditions. As you allude to, actual usage (and the conditions of that usage) are a more appropriate barometer in my mind, i.e. Miles driven w/ a consideration given to climate, usage and 'types' of usage. As an example:

We have/had 3 cars with considerably different usage patterns; all protected with same set of products (coatings) – (October 2016 thru May 2019)

Car 1 will likely get to 3 years (if not longer) before needing to be completely redone. (Applied October 2016, re-done June 2019 for different coating curiosity, original coating at 85% ‘as applied’)

Car 2 will likely never need to be redone. (Sold January 2019, coating at 90% as applied in 08/2017)

Car 3 got to nearly 2 years before needing to be redone. (applied September 2017, re-done in May 2019 @42k miles; still OK on hood, roof and trunk lid but toast on sides)

Car 1 is about 5500 miles a year, no freeway, sits outside from April thru November but only really driven daily November thru April, short trips, no freeway.

Car 2 is daily driver in nice weather, April thru November, usually no-rain days only, always garaged, 5500 miles a year, rarely freeway.

Car 3 is year round daily driver, generally always garaged, 25k miles a year, 95% freeway.
All are in NE Ohio.

Same protection, varying usage far different likely outcomes. Freeway use, especially during winter, is very, very hard on a vehicles finish.

Having seen a lot of faded cars last time I was in Arizona, I’m guessing they have a whole different kind of nightmare to deal with, entire different set of circumstances to cope with. Florida apparently has acid-filled Love Bugs that can etch paint if left for too long…another nightmare entirely.

Point being, no claims listed on a box can even begin to adequately predict longevity. It’s the ultimate YMMV scenario.

As for the super-duper, awe-inspiring graphene, well, methinks it's not quite ready for Prime Time despite some pretty sensationalist claims.

I applied a pro level graphene (SPS) on my daily driver for 14 months, 16k miles. Overall it was a very nice coating but fell a bit short in some areas here in NE Ohio so I'm back to my preferred ceramics which are a better fit overall. The entire graphene experience in more detail here: SPS Graphene Coating

I have another graphene coating on my daily driver now (Ethos) and it's been a bit less than sensational so far, about 4 months, 5k miles in. Further details here: Ethos Graphene Matrix Coating

Graphene really 'hit the scene' towards the middle/end of Summer, lots of (IMO) 2nd tier mfg's like Ethos, Glassparency, Adams, Turtle Wax, 303 and some others came out with all sorts of sensationalist claims. Who's missing from that list? Well, the traditional heavy hitters in the coating space like Gyeon, CarPro, Feynlab, Gtechniq and others...many of whom have commented that they looked into it but the technology just isn't there yet to produce a TRUE graphene coating that will take advantage of the primary benefits of graphene. Most current graphene coatings are ceramic-based formulations w/ Reduced Graphene Oxide sprinkled in....which will settle out of solution if left on the shelf long enough for whatever that's worth.

While trying to figure out "Is it live or is it Memorex?" I found some resources out there, whole bunch of graphene related links and opinions here: Other Stuff

I'm not convinced graphene, as it currently exists, provides any real benefits...which doesn't make a 'graphene coating' a bad product in and of itself; you might be quite pleased with one but I'm guessing the biggest part that graphene plays in that is merely taking up space on the product label. I'm no scientist, chemist, nor a professional detailer or coating mfg so take all of the above with the appropriate grain of salt. As always, YMMV.

At the end of the day, find what you like and use it often...wax, sealant, coating or otherwise. While I've been a coating-junkie for the last 4 years, I'm finding Paint Protection Film even more to my liking...even less work. I like clean cars but I don't much like cleaning them :D

And if I had a true garage queen that saw little use, I'd find the most luscious wax I could and bury the car in it. Nothing is always, nothing is never and generally personal preference is the best way to go.
 

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Before I comment here, I'll just state right up front I'm not super into detailing. I come at car cleaning and interior/exterior maintenance from a very pragmatic perspective. I do enough of it to keep my car looking decent, but I'm not obsessive about it. I can honestly go weeks (or months) between washings. I want this part of car ownership to be as quick and easy as possible, yet still give me a car I'm happy to look at most of the time.

As such, I've been quite happy with (gasp!) Turtle Wax Hybrid Solutions Ceramic Spray. Specifically, the stuff in the green label bottle (Hybrid Solutions Ceramic Wax Spray Coating 16 FL OZ)

It is super easy to use. Spray on very lightly, wipe off. Way easier than any old school carnauba wax product. No dusting, no streaking, no heavy elbow grease. Lasts a seemingly long time.

I don't care one bit that it says it has "ceramic" or is a "hybrid" or any such marketing nonsense (don't get me started on what I think of the boutique stuff that comes in little crystal jars and is applied with eye droppers).

This stuff works, provides good shine, good sheeting, and has good durability - at least long enough that I can do it 2 times a year and call it good. I'd like to say I'd do it 3 or 4 times a year, but I'm not that into it.

So, definitely there are good options outside of the boutique brands. In doing a bit of research, it seems many are of the opinion the lowly Turtle Wax brand has done some really good work here. I'm in that camp.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I personally use collinite wax Their manufacturing facility was in my territory, I used it on the boat, great stuff for sure.
 

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Before I comment here, I'll just state right up front I'm not super into detailing. I come at car cleaning and interior/exterior maintenance from a very pragmatic perspective. I do enough of it to keep my car looking decent, but I'm not obsessive about it. I can honestly go weeks (or months) between washings. I want this part of car ownership to be as quick and easy as possible, yet still give me a car I'm happy to look at most of the time.
My whole end-game is geared towards "I like clean cars but I don't like cleaning cars..." which works nicely with my inherent laziness. It's quite possible that our daily drivers may get washed 3 or 4 times between April and November and then not at all from November until it gets warm.

So, definitely there are good options outside of the boutique brands. In doing a bit of research, it seems many are of the opinion the lowly Turtle Wax brand has done some really good work here. I'm in that camp.
Turtle Wax has been absolutely killing it over the past 12-18 months; a far, far cry from the 'ol Turtle Wax paste Dad used to slather on the 'ol Country Squire station wagon back in the 1970's :D
 

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Most current graphene coatings are ceramic-based formulations w/ Reduced Graphene Oxide sprinkled in....which will settle out of solution if left on the shelf long enough for whatever that's worth.
Yep... So what seems to be popular is labeling a product a 'graphene' or 'ceramic' or whatever product, when it is really just a standard sealant with an additive in it. Not that additives are bad, but is it really doing anything? My common sense radar makes me question the validity of claims of incredible clarity and shine produced by a product with black carbon in it.

Turtle Wax has been absolutely killing it over the past 12-18 months; a far, far cry from the 'ol Turtle Wax paste Dad used to slather on the 'ol Country Squire station wagon back in the 1970's
Innovate or die! I wonder if they are a sister brand with one of the other big players like Megs or Mother's?
 

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Suggested viewing from the Project Farm:

The Turtle Wax Hybrid Solutions is working quite nicely on my '09 Boxster. It continues looking and feeling good. It's been on for about 3 months, and experienced lots of weather - including snow and melted snow runoff. I did half of one of the wheels with it just to see if it made a difference. There was slightly less brake dust on the wheel in that area, but the big difference was in cleaning it - what was on that part of the wheel hosed right off. Next step is to do all the wheels with it.
 
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