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I've owned the 07 CS for 6 months and just performed my first oil/filter change. I've changed oil and filter hundreds of times over the years, so I'm not a newbie at this. But, the Porsche change is just a bit different and that's because of the filter design. Not sure I like the separate housing and filter. For me, the negative is the messiness of changing the filter. I use the plastic bag method and with a spin-on filter, it's a snap to spin it off, zip the bag and toss it. With the plastic housing, I used the same method, but then, instead of tossing the housing, had to clean it for reinstall. What I found was that I didn't get it completely clean and it was challenging to tighten - too slippery for initial hand tightening.

Now, of course, the positive aspect of this design is being able to cut open the filter and examine the pleats for debris and metal. There were a few tiny metal flakes - nothing to worry about. But, I'm not sure that aspect is enough to offset the messier aspect of removing/reinstalling the filter.

With all of that said, has anyone replaced the filter housing set-up with the spin-on filter set-up and REGRETTED it? From my perspective, I only see positives from such a change, but I'm wondering if anyone has made this change and not been happy. Thanks for the feedback.
 

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Yes it is a pain. It reminds me of some oil burner filter housings. I have not made the change, but it would provide a better choice of filters and ease of removing and installing. I change my oil frequently so I'm not too concerned about the filter itself, but the spin on should be a plus. let's here what others have to say.
 

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Hi WetinOregon

Firstly, I'll admit to being no expert with regard to why Porsche decided to go this route with the oil filter setup, I must admit, it's the first car I've had that's setup this way. Having said that, you have already touched on the advantage of being able to open up your filter, for me this is a great chance to see what is swimming around in the motor, couple this with a magnetic drain plug and you are in a position, (with a little luck), to possibly identify premature part degradation before a major engine incident occurs. How often you check your filter will obviously depend on the type of use, some of the track guys choose to change their oil/filters after each event, for sure, their filters will get opened up. Even if you don't track your car, trying to get the heads up is still a good thing, from your post above I know you already know this.

The thing is, what it boils down to is this :-
Quicker/Cleaner oil change procedure, but not as much of an idea of whats going on inside the motor
OR
A Slower/Messier oil change procedure, but have a much more well informed view of the wear and tear on your motors internals.

If it was a lawn mower, I'd choose the first one, I think you know where I am heading with this one, a possibly avoidable blown engine would be my regret, I would therefore always choose the second option, ultimately, it's your choice and I wish you all the best with your motoring which ever route you decide to take.

Mind you, you could always send your used engine oil away for analysis.

Regards
 

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The separate filter element means less waste. The filter element can be easily burned after the oil is pressed from the filter element and reclaimed. With a spin on filter the filter element is of course inside the housing. The filters can be crushed to extract some of the oil but not as much as if the filter element was by itself. The crushed filter housings/elements then are exposed to considerable heat over a period of time to carbonize the rubber seals, gaskets, and filter elements so the metal can then be reused.

What I do is I have a 2nd filter housing, clean and ready to use. I drop the filter housing into the drain pan then install a fresh o-ring on the filter housing and install a new filter element then fill up the filter housing with oil and smear some clean oil on the housing threads and o-ring then install and tighten the filter element.

Later I clean the dirty filter housing with something like brake cleaner or electronics cleaner, something that doesn't leave a residue. The filter element gets tossed into the recycle bin at the local auto parts store when I take the oil back to dump in their oil recycle tank.

BTW, I like the separate filter element and not because it is easier to examine the filter element as I don't bother to examine it. I just don't like the spin on filters.
 
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