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Discussion Starter #1
Here is my first experience with service at my dealer. Booked an appointment online, received an email confirmation from a person. I checked a few days before and the appointment was not there, but they said they could handle my service as I planned it. The dealer is 2.5 hours away.
I had some things to do while there so I arranged a loaner.
The loaner turned out to be an entry level Mercedes but it was only for a couple of hours, so what?
Got back to the dealer after 2.5 hours, but the car was not ready. In fact, it took 5 hours and the desk would not tell me anything about why it took 5 hours for an oil change.
The next day I received my service questionnaire and blasted them. Got a call that night from the service manager who admitted they double-booked the technician, essentially upsetting two customers instead of just one. He promised flawless service the next time.
My lesson is to use their pick up and loaner service next time as they will come pick up my car 2.5 hours away. I was not inclined to let someone drive my car 250 miles RT, but that seems preferable to long waits in their not-very-luxurious waiting area.
Not the kind of experience I anticipated with a Porsche; I get far better service on my Chevy pickup.

Larry
 

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I would have handled the situation a little differently. Let me preface by saying I am on your side and I completely understand your frustration.

Blasting them on a survey is the quickest way to get yourself blacklisted at the dealership. You should have approached the service manager and explained your frustration prior to filling out the survey. You use the survey as leverage and only if they can't resolve the situation to a satisfactory manner, you take the route that you have.

The fact that your dealership is 2.5 hours away indicates to me that your choices in servicing your car is very limited and filling out a survey with such harsh results may rub this dealership the wrong way, even if it was their fault to begin with.
 

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Blast away!
My installation for a clear front wrap was a nightmare, took three trips to get it right. after the second trip, filled out the form as
'no way would I be back". Got a call from the Service Manager wanting to try again. Third time it was done right.
Service's after that have been exceptional for oil changes, one and two year service intervals and pad changes.
My advice is to find another Dealer if the next Service is more of the same.
The Dealership may not view your Service as important but Porsche NA sure does.-Richard
 
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Discussion Starter #4
I am not going to worry about the survey; if they blacklist me I will go to another dealer, also 2.5 hours away. I have already talked with them and they would love my business. They know my experience leads to potential new business including car purchase.
Larry
 

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Sorry to hear of your experience, you handled it as most people would. It is frustrating.

While I can understand the idea to stick with the dealer...personally, I would find a shop closer to home. I would never drive 2.5 hours each way for an oil change. Find a competent local Indy and use them for everything. It is just a car, routine maintenance is....routine.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Is there an inverse law that says the more exclusive/expensive the car, the worse the service experience? We had horrible service experiences with our Mercedes, but some really good ones with Chevrolet, GMC, Buick, etc.
Larry
 

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I would have handled the situation a little differently. Let me preface by saying I am on your side and I completely understand your frustration.

Blasting them on a survey is the quickest way to get yourself blacklisted at the dealership. You should have approached the service manager and explained your frustration prior to filling out the survey. You use the survey as leverage and only if they can't resolve the situation to a satisfactory manner, you take the route that you have.

The fact that your dealership is 2.5 hours away indicates to me that your choices in servicing your car is very limited and filling out a survey with such harsh results may rub this dealership the wrong way, even if it was their fault to begin with.
Potsnu, it's not that I don't agree with you but it is sad that you buy a car at these prices and pay the same crazy prices for service and then when it all goes south like it did for the OP, it is the paying customer that has to seek satisfaction...
 

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just curious...

we have a lounge for the customer. its not crazy luxurious.. but it has a TV and Cable TV. and internet .. and we do oil changes in like 1 hour to 1:30hours.. cooldown 15 to 30 min .. drain is about 30 min.. and fill up.. 10 min.. but we charge 1/2 of the dealer.. would your rather have that..??

Lemon


Here is my first experience with service at my dealer. Booked an appointment online, received an email confirmation from a person. I checked a few days before and the appointment was not there, but they said they could handle my service as I planned it. The dealer is 2.5 hours away.
I had some things to do while there so I arranged a loaner.
The loaner turned out to be an entry level Mercedes but it was only for a couple of hours, so what?
Got back to the dealer after 2.5 hours, but the car was not ready. In fact, it took 5 hours and the desk would not tell me anything about why it took 5 hours for an oil change.
The next day I received my service questionnaire and blasted them. Got a call that night from the service manager who admitted they double-booked the technician, essentially upsetting two customers instead of just one. He promised flawless service the next time.
My lesson is to use their pick up and loaner service next time as they will come pick up my car 2.5 hours away. I was not inclined to let someone drive my car 250 miles RT, but that seems preferable to long waits in their not-very-luxurious waiting area.
Not the kind of experience I anticipated with a Porsche; I get far better service on my Chevy pickup.

Larry
 

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Sometimes the car manufacturer will mail or call to check on how your service went. My local Porsche dealer asked me to give them the highest ratings as anything less than a five for any category was considered a fail by PCNA. Some of that may flow back to when they get to order cars, etc.

In the 1990s I had a 1.8 G60 supercharged VW Corrado. The dealer kept overfilling it with the oil for a VR6 engine (almost 2 qts too much). The first time I didn't catch it until there was blue smoke the next day. I immediately took it back and had them drain it. They could not believe they could have done so. They had some sort of pre-filler device that they set the amount and let it go. They showed me the book and it showed the VR6 amount. I told them, how much goes in a regular 1.8? They said 4 quarts. I said this is a 1.8, not a 2.8. Anyway, I was surveyed by VWOA the next day and told them what happened. Within 15 minutes the dealer called me and begged me to bring the car in again immediately to check the oil level. I assume VW was going to hold them liable for any damage that the overfill might cause.

In any case, this dealer did the same thing twice more. By then, I was smart enough to check the oil level before leaving the dealership and had them pull it in and drain the oil while I waited. VW called both times and I repeated the story. Long story, dealer went out of business shortly thereafter.
 

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Is there an inverse law that says the more exclusive/expensive the car, the worse the service experience? We had horrible service experiences with our Mercedes, but some really good ones with Chevrolet, GMC, Buick, etc.
Larry
I think people who afford expensive cars have higher expectations of service.





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I would have handled the situation a little differently. Let me preface by saying I am on your side and I completely understand your frustration.

Blasting them on a survey is the quickest way to get yourself blacklisted at the dealership. You should have approached the service manager and explained your frustration prior to filling out the survey. You use the survey as leverage and only if they can't resolve the situation to a satisfactory manner, you take the route that you have.

The fact that your dealership is 2.5 hours away indicates to me that your choices in servicing your car is very limited and filling out a survey with such harsh results may rub this dealership the wrong way, even if it was their fault to begin with.
I understand the sentiment: try and work things out before escalating. The "satisfaction survey" is the equalizer in the realtionship between Porsche owner and Porsche dealer, and PCNA and Porsche Canada take it VERY seriously. The service manager knew they had screwed up, and rather than deal with it when the customer was on the premises, chose to leave it unaddressed. Only after a complaint had come back through Porsche did it become a priority. While at the dealer, by all means try and get things worked out...but once a dealer lets an unsatisfied customer walk out the door, they should EXPECT to be blasted on the survey.

BTW, on my last satisfaction survey, I noted that the survey itself was poorly constructed, and made assumptions about me as a customer that were incorrect. As such, other than as a tool for making complaints, the survey was pretty much a waste of my time and Porsche was missing an opportunity to extract useful information from me. I got a call back from Porsche saying they would have someone from Marketing contact me. When they did so the next day, they listened attentively to my suggestions that well-constructed online surveys use "if-then" branching to dig deeper into issues and attitudes. For example, rather than asking a single question "Did the dealer explain to you the work that was performed?" a better question is "Did the dealer provide you the appropriate level of information about the work that was performed?" If answered "No" the door is open to discover with follow-up questions why the info provided was inappropriate. In my case, I had coil packs and serpentine belt replaced ahead of the suggested maintenance schedule and I had to explain to the service writer why I was doing two items off-schedule. (I had a slightly rough idle, and replacing coils when doing plugs only cost a few hundred more, and waiting until 90,000k to replace the serpentine belt on a DD that gets used in weather from -40C to +35C seemed an unnecessaty risk.) Will Porsche revise the survey? Don't know...but they spent a half hour on the phone with me getting my persective on why their survey sucked.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
I am not sure what you are asking. I would rather have a competent, efficient service. I have been in some crummy and some nice waiting areas in my life but they just color the perception of the dealership. If I am already upset because it has been 5 hours, even free flowing champagne wouldn't help.
Larry
 

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I'd go even farther, and say that overly-appointed dealership waiting areas with more amenities than an exclusive country club are actively harmful to my perception of the dealership, especially if something doesn't go just right. It sends the signal that the dealer's priorities are misaligned with my own, as an owner.
 

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Not the kind of experience I anticipated with a Porsche. I get far better service on my Chevy pickup.
Why is that? Because you spent $75,000 or so and expect it to better than the Chevy service the $75,000 Corvette owners get? Or do you put this on Porsche AG or Porsche Cars North America expecting more from the brand vice GM?

Are you upset with Porsche AG/PCNA or with the owner of the dealership you chose?

I ask because many, if not just about close to all, dealerships are no longer owned by a single person. They are just one of many dealerships owned by a company that runs dealerships for many brands. For example, the Hendrick Auto Group owns many, many dealerships and in your state both a Chevy dealership and a Porsche dealership. If the Porsche dealer you chose is one of these companies that own many dealerships, you might want to take it to corporate headquarters. OTH, if the dealership is owned by one person it becomes much easier. Write to the owner. In any case, IMO if you feel service was poor, then tell them.

Otherwise are passively supporting their position by inaction and they will think nothing of repeating the poor performance again and again and again, for every customer.
 

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Is there an inverse law that says the more exclusive/expensive the car, the worse the service experience? We had horrible service experiences with our Mercedes, but some really good ones with Chevrolet, GMC, Buick, etc.
Larry
It depends on dealership, they are all different. I had a GMC Enjoy and a Jeep Grand Cherokee, the waiting area is tiny, small tv, no snacks, and only drink you have is water. It is very simple. With Porsche and Mercedes, the waiting area is a nice lounge with modern furniture and decor. Big LED tv, fresh donuts, patries, tea, coffee, juice, and water. It's not even close in comparison, both the Mercedes and Porsche takes about an hour to do the oil/filter change. I browse around in the showroom like a 10 year old at Toys R US, I actually don't mind and enjoy my visit. Rarely am I there long enough to need a car loaner.
 

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This is an issue that you can't extrapolate to all dealers. My dealer is great and always took care of me (I had bought an Audi there previously). The service manager always comes out to genuinely talk to me, knows who I am, and always asks many questions about my car and if he can help further. Same goes for my SA who always insists on knowing when I come for service and talks Porsches, satisfaction, etc. yes, there is a business angle to this but there is also a genuine personal angle to it. I have nothing but good things to say.

like all business, whetever options you have, a place where you have a genuine relationship will be better.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I think ownership may be a key. Here in my little town the car dealers are owned by someone local, the employees have worked there generally a long time and take pride in what they do. The Mercedes and Porsche experiences I have had were at dealerships with many locations throughout the State, absentee ownership, with a more corporate feel. Seems like some employees are going through the motions or stuck with policies dictated from far away. But,I am sure my Porsche tech was a competent, certified guy. I saw him, no young kid. Dispatch assigned him two cars, I doubt he was I a position to refuse. Going forward, the less I know about Porsche service, the better and I think that is what that corporation(the dealership) wants. Meanwhile, when I take my Chevy truck in, I will continue to take donuts and banter with the gang.
Larry
 

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This thread settles it: for my first (10K) service I will do it myself. it is just an oil change and level checks. A few days ago I changed the break in oil at 5000 miles by myself, it was easy with the proper tools. I used the "981 oil change with pics" thread as a guide. My dealer is 3+ hours away, I will use them only for warranty work or major service.
 
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