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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was on my way to an appointment "early" yesterday morning (8:15 feels early on a Saturday, at least). There's a fairly short, tight, cloverleaf-style on ramp to the highway. Starting from a dead stop at a traffic light, with no one in front of me, I was definitely on the gas when I nailed a pothole. I actually SAW it and had tried to maneuver around it, but obviously must have misjudged where it was. I couldn't have been going more that 20 or 25 mph yet considering I started from a standstill, plus it's a bit steep, plus it's a tight curve.
Anyway, the TPS does it's long beep at me, and the air pressure steadily drops to -32.

I pulled off into a big pull-out area a ways down an exit ramp and started the recovery process. I tried the pump (which is convenient to have), but of course the tire wouldn't hold air. It took me a while to figure out the pictogram on removing the inner needle on the tire's filler-nozzle (it's technical, I know) to get the fix-a-flat goop into the tire, but even with the goop in it, no luck on holding air. Is there a trick to getting the goop to work? If there's a puncture on top of the tire, for instance, but all the goop squeezes into the bottom, are you supposed to roll the tire around, or how is it supposed to fill the top? I didn't see anything in the pictogram to indicate as such.

Anyway, I called Porsche Roadside Assistance. After 15 minutes or so on hold (this was about 9:30 am), they scheduled a flatbed to come take the car to the dealership. About 90 minutes later the truck finally arrived and in about 2 minutes had the car loaded up and on its way.

The dealer called and has a new tire on order. I had semi-reluctantly added tire and wheel insurance since I know I sometimes scrape my wheels while parallel parking and thought I'd be able to use it for that, but now I'm happy I had it - total cost out of pocket for me shouldn't be more than the $50 deductible, it sounds like.

My takeaways, or TLDR: No spare sucks. I don't know how to use goop. Porsche roadside assistance is slow. Glad I bought the insurance.
 

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Good news is sounds like your rims are OK. Years ago in my 914 I was approaching a pothole at about 50mph. Looked like I could easily squeeze between it and the curb, so reduced speed only slightly. Too late I noticed a chunk of concrete by the curb - tried to squeeze through and didn't make it. Killed the two passenger side tires & rims. The single spare did me little good.:(
 

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To all the worry worts: relax. Flats don't happen that often. I'm on my 9th Porsche since my 1970 914, 47 years ago. I have had no flat tires. ...Not saying they don't happen, but they are certainly not common.
 

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I was driving my wife's Mercedes a couple months ago and had a similar experience, hit a chunk of concrete in the road and caught the edge of both passenger side rims. Yup, both tires split right at the rim and went flat. Had to replace both tires. After that experience I went on Youtube and found this video on how to properly fix a flat on a Porsche.
check out this video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOhEcBqO2jM
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah, the dealer didn't notice any rim issues yet, but I guess we'll see once they spend more time with it. Interesting hearing the other stories about flats, thanks. I know they're pretty rare - the first I've had in 15+ years - but the lack of a spare is going to weigh over my head for a while.

Takeshi, I couldn't exactly see what the tire damage was like since I had no jack. I think I'll be adding one to the frunk.

Porsche provides three tools for fixing a flat:
1. An air pump
2. Goop
3. Roadside assistance.

I tried all of them. You say goop isn't a one-size-fits-all solution, but it's essentially all that's provide with the vehicle. Was there something else I missed?
 

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I've heard "not so great things" about mechanics trying to get the goop off of the rim once the tire is being correctly fixed after a roadside repair. Not sure how much truth there is to these but it was enough for me to put together a flat tire kit.


Bag Red Luggage and bags Baggage Everyday carry


With this kit I am able to get the tire off of the car if need be, repair the puncture (hopefully), air it up (using the car's air compressor), and get back on the road. The picture is an old one, I have since added a piece to the jack that allows me to use my ratchet to raise and lower it eliminating the jack handle. Total weight of the kit is about 15 lbs and it's secured in the frunk via heavy duty Velcro. Maybe overkill but I worry less knowing it's there.

Happy Motoring!
 
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I carry a plug kit and a can of a non-flammable, TPMS friendly, and washable off-the-shelf tire goop. I've only used a can once and could feel the stuff sloshing around in a front tire. It did seal the leak somehow and come off the rim barrel with no trace. On the rest of my flats I've had to get an indie flat-bed since the tire got shredded.
 

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I've heard "not so great things" about mechanics trying to get the goop off of the rim once the tire is being correctly fixed after a roadside repair. Not sure how much truth there is to these but it was enough for me to put together a flat tire kit.


View attachment 148305

With this kit I am able to get the tire off of the car if need be, repair the puncture (hopefully), air it up (using the car's air compressor), and get back on the road. The picture is an old one, I have since added a piece to the jack that allows me to use my ratchet to raise and lower it eliminating the jack handle. Total weight of the kit is about 15 lbs and it's secured in the frunk via heavy duty Velcro. Maybe overkill but I worry less knowing it's there.

Happy Motoring!
I put together a similar kit and a couple plastic wheel chocks. Also a plug kit that I haven't had to use. Have you tried actually breaking loose the lugs with your ratchet? It looks a little short to get enough leverage for properly torqued bolts. I use an extendable 1/2" breaker bar that extends to 21", and I still have to put a lot of shoulder into it. Extendable Lug Wrench
 
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We had a flat with my Nissan, (also no spare) and when I called the service manager he said to NEVER use the tire goop unless it is an emergency. It is very costly to replace the TPMS and clean the wheel. Fortunately the Nissan has roadside assistance and the tow to the dealer was free. We bought 4 new tires and one month later we had another flat (wife hit a curb) and another tow and they replaced the tire, no charge.
 
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I have AAA gold card. Up to 100 miles flat bed / towing to whomever you would like ie a good tire shop. Plus I carry a plug kit.
 

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I suppose someone somewhere has the data on what types of tire damage occur. Been driving about 50 years and have suffered one blowout on a new tire (early 70's), a tire that went very out of round on a trip (mid 80's), the hunk of concrete incident I mentioned earlier (late 80's), and many, many nails in tires. So from my experience, being able to plug a tire en route would handle the majority of situations I've had. A couple years ago I picked up a nail on a multi-day trip in the Cayman. I nursed it home by stopping to fill with air every couple hours, then plugged it when I got home. (I know I'm supposed to go in and get a professional repair, but I don't track the car and it holds air fine.) I really like the idea of carrying a jack to make patching it on the road a bit easier. I've thought of a spare tire, but seems like I'd lose too much luggage room when on a trip.
 

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Using goop is a no-no, so I even removed the crap. Put my Stop'nGo flat tire repair kit in its place. I also replaced the factory compressor with a DynaPlug one, since it has both a SAE and cigarette lighter adapters. Read that the factory one can blow fuses. Since I have a battery pigtail connected directly to the battery routed to the base of the passenger windshield, no worries. And bought a Porsche jack on eBay that fits perfectly behind the passenger seat, even all the way back and all the way down, so no drawbacks. And finally, with 118 ft/lbs, also put with the jack a Gorilla wrench. And a threaded rod sold by Suncoast, to avoid damaging the calipers, along with a thick garbage bag, gloves, etc. And yes, I'm extremely careful where I tread. If I get pulled over again, now won't do it on the highway/freeway. The couple of flats I've had were when pulled over. All kinds of crap on the side of the road. Now go to an exit. Or if no traffic, and no exit anywhere close, slow down to a crawl over the highway, then pull over, looking very carefully, where it's less likely to get a flat. Same thing if you're in unfamiliar places and need to make a U-turn. Prefer to travel a mile or two than do it where nobody treads.
 

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Here I am, 200 miles from home, reading this stuff before I head back! First time taking the Boxster anywhere aside from the drive back when I bought it...

Can roadside assistance do the patch with the goop kit?
 

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Try not to become obsessed with it. The spare kit seems like a good idea until you realize there's no place to easily haul the wheel/flat to a tire shop. Flats are rare anymore and 99 of a 100 are from a nail or screw which will create a slow leak not a catastrofic one. Before becoming a full time resident of Florida, I drove my Cayman down every fall and made a return trip every spring for 5 years with zero problems. It was 1200 miles each way and often I'd drive it straight through with fuel stops only. One time in that same time span I was driving my Acura RDX and hit a stray hunk of metal on I 95 in Georgia that put an 8 inch slice in my tire. No amount of patching was going to save it and all air was gone immediately. In that case I had a donut so AAA mounted it for me and directed me to a tire store since I still had another 700 miles to go. I could as easily just had it flat bedded to the tire dealer. Either way, a rarity and not a crisis. Just don't let them wear down so low they will search out nails to punish you.:cheers:
 

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Yeah, the dealer didn't notice any rim issues yet, but I guess we'll see once they spend more time with it. Interesting hearing the other stories about flats, thanks. I know they're pretty rare - the first I've had in 15+ years - but the lack of a spare is going to weigh over my head for a while.

Takeshi, I couldn't exactly see what the tire damage was like since I had no jack. I think I'll be adding one to the frunk.

Porsche provides three tools for fixing a flat:
1. An air pump
2. Goop
3. Roadside assistance.

I tried all of them. You say goop isn't a one-size-fits-all solution, but it's essentially all that's provide with the vehicle. Was there something else I missed?
The most important one is missing. Tire plug kit. I have one in every car. Works just like umbrella :)
I'd never used the goop. It probably won't work and it'll mess up the rim.
 

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Just took a look on Ebay. Was the jack you bought Porsche specific, or just a general purpose scissor jack?
It has to be Porsche specific, because it has the ovoid thing on top, to fit into the matching holes on the lifting points. It was from a previous generation Cayman, I believe. And with a tray and everything, but I discarded it. It was never used. Mostly junk yards sell them. You should be able to choose from several. The ones I was shopping had excellent pictures. Good luck.
 

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Try not to become obsessed with it. The spare kit seems like a good idea until you realize there's no place to easily haul the wheel/flat to a tire shop. Flats are rare anymore and 99 of a 100 are from a nail or screw which will create a slow leak not a catastrofic one. Before becoming a full time resident of Florida, I drove my Cayman down every fall and made a return trip every spring for 5 years with zero problems. It was 1200 miles each way and often I'd drive it straight through with fuel stops only. One time in that same time span I was driving my Acura RDX and hit a stray hunk of metal on I 95 in Georgia that put an 8 inch slice in my tire. No amount of patching was going to save it and all air was gone immediately. In that case I had a donut so AAA mounted it for me and directed me to a tire stoe since I still had another 700 miles to go. I could as easily just had it flat bedded to the tire dealer. Either way, a rarity and not a crisis. Just don't let them wear down so low they will search out nails to punish you.:cheers:
I agree. Fifty years ago blowouts were common. Today it's the exception to the rule: a slow leak from a nail puncture is the norm. The worst case I encountered in the last 10 years was a leak which required me to add air via the compressor which Porsche supples. I was in the middle of a long trip, and I had to add air twice in a 500 mile trip. I used TPMS as my guide. When it was illuminated, I added air. Fortunately for me the tires had over 15K miles, so I replaced all four when I got back home.
 
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