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Re: Halogen Upgrade

My low beams are just halogens in projector housings so I did the same upgrade as I did on my old*Miata, and picked up some Night Breakers.



Removing the headlight assembly is probably the easiest in the business. Insert the tool, rotate, and out it pops.*



Reinstalling them is a little more violent in terms of sound, as it's not so much a "satisfying click," rather an "unmistakable pop" as that bar snaps into place.





Rear cover removed.



Results on the road are more clear but these give you an idea.



Nice job! Doesn’t Osram have a short lifespan because of the blue coating? Have you considered LED headlights?
 

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Discussion Starter #42 (Edited)
Re: Halogen Upgrade

Nice job! Doesn’t Osram have a short lifespan because of the blue coating? Have you considered LED headlights?
Hadn't heard of the short lifespan but I guess I'll find out!

I have considered new headlights but not too seriously right now. Still have suspension and wheels to upgrade first.

May do Xenon headlights but not sure it's worth $3k.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Sprint Booster

This time when I opened up the box, the booster was actually still inside. Great start so far.



Removed the screw and pulled out the pedal assembly.





Now all ya gotta do is push the gray tab on the back and disconnect the connector. And so I did. And then the tab broke. :(

90 frustrating minutes later I finally got it apart. Knowing I didn't have any leverage from the back side, I tried several different tools to lift up the remainder of the gray tab from the front.



The problem was the gray tab wasn't holding it together, nay, it was the black tab which is somehow connected to the gray part. I had to lift it above the little plastic stub seen below to separate them.



Now without the tab, there's no more "satisfying click." Fortunately the connectors are pretty tight (well not really fortunate when you're trying to remove them) and so I added some loom tape for good measure.



Then zip tied the cable out of the way and tucked the rest of it behind the center console. The selector can also hide inside that storage area so all in all, a pretty discrete setup.





Then I took it out and played with the settings. Noticeable improvement. :burnout:

The "race" mode is too twitchy for city driving so I'll probably leave that for spirited canyon runs, but the "sport" mode on setting #7 seemed to be a good compromise. Car feels more alive and responsive.

Alrighty.
 

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Re: Sprint Booster

Does your car have Sport Chrono? Or have you driven a 987 with it?

I'm curious how the Sprint Booster compares. Seems like (at least with the throttle remapping) they do about the same thing.
 

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Re: Sprint Booster

Sprint Booster provides a throttle remap similar to Sport Chrono but with more settings across a spectrum. Sport Chrono is an on/off feature whereas Spring Booster is a 1-10 spectrum.

What Sprint Booster doesn't do that Sport Chrono does is allow greater slip angles before traction control (PCM) kicks in.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Re: Sprint Booster

No sport chrono on mine, but I had it on my 981. It is the same thing, however the actual mapping is probably slightly different. Pretty solid bang for your buck IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Suspension Refresh & More

I have 2 other updates besides the suspension refresh, but with all the scope creep that happened, let's get right to it.

Car as it sat on the base suspension:



New parts:



Parts List:

Front Damper - Bilstein B6 (x2)
P/N 35-122180

Cayman R Front Spring Set (x1)
P/N 98734353140504

Front Strut Mount (x2)
P/N 99734301801

Front Shock Bearing (x2)
P/N 99634351505

Rear Damper - Bilstein B6 (x2)
P/N 35-122197

Cayman R Rear Spring Set (x1)
P/N 98733353196504

Rear Shock Mount (x2)
P/N 98733305900

Rear Strut Bushing (x2)
P/N 98733350400

Also new lock nuts and caliper bolts since they're torque-to-yield.



Started off with taking the interior rear panels out to get access to the rear shock mount.





Broke the plastic standoff for this metal clip. Used epoxy to glue it back and all is well.













And here we are.



Accessing the fronts is a lot easier. Marked the location of the nuts to be consistent on both sides and make the car drive-able on my way to the alignment appointment.



Removed the sway bar bolt which pinches the strut in the carrier.



Then loosened the control arm bushing bolt to allow the assembly to rotate down. I also loosened the plastic panel underneath the car to prevent it from possibly cracking.





Not too bad.





With the front carriers, rotors, and calipers all held up, moved to the rear, where the real fun begins.



The axle is secured to the transmission with 6, M10 triple square bolts. The presence of the CV joint boot limits access to only 2 at a time before needing to rotate. But you need the parking brake on to prevent it from rotating so you can actually loosen it. So you gotta engage the brake, loosen 2, then crawl out from underneath the car, disengage the brake, crawl back under, rotate, then back to engaging the brake, then loosen, then repeat on the other side. Ay dios mio.



You can help yourself by removing the lower support plate so you don't need 18" of extensions. Eventually I removed the plate so at least reassembly was easier.





Popping off the ball joint for the toe link and removing it went smoothly.





The control arm ball joint? Yeah, not so much. Technically you don't have to do this and can just loosen/remove the bushing bolt, but I tried following the factory procedures.

The inner CV boot kills your clearance and I ended up damaging the bolt since I couldn't get a good grip on it with the ball joint separator.



So I went ahead and removed the bushing bolt.



And had to use a pry bar to get it out of its housing.



I figured that would've been enough, but that 1/2" lip at the top was blocking me from removing it. :facepalm:



I wasn't about to try to compress the spring on the car, so I also removed the other, longitudinal control arm bolt.



Last thing was removing the end of the parking brake cable from its base so the whole assembly can be removed from the car. Fortunately that doesn't require the entire console to be removed, just the storage area.

 

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Discussion Starter #48
Suspension Refresh & More

Alright, so now everything's out but I'm stuck with a bent ball joint stud on the control arm. :(



Drastic times call for drastic measures so the plan was to heat it up, bend it straight, then knock it out with a good ol' fashioned air hammer.

Of course doing that requires the axle to be removed so you can have direct access to the stud, plus I obviously didn't want to damage the boot. First step is getting the 32 mm axle nut off and my 1/2" impact wrench can definitely do that with its 600 ft-lbs of nut-bustin' torque, but to be safe, I wanted to have that torque react against something. If you do this on the car, it's easy but clearly that's not my situation here.

Decided to put the carrier/rotor back on the wheel which was a bit tricky given the awkward shape and weight.



Then set the wheel against the wall so if it does wanna rotate, it'll have something to block it. At this point I was picturing the wheel climbing up the wall, rolling on the ceiling, then landing on the car. :laugh:

Anyway, got it out, then realized I damaged a couple of threads on the axle.







Got a thread file to help clean them up, and also bought 2 new axle nuts since they're lock nuts (scope creep continues).





Now onto my friend's house and his oxy-acetylene torch. :eek:



Once it was straight, busted out the air hammer and we get this:


Watching that still makes me laugh. I spent a solid hour and applied so much manual force, all to be taken care of with compressed air in 2 seconds.

Not wanting to use that control arm again, and wanting to get fresh rubber under the car, I got new control arms and if I'm going this far, might as well get new toe links too. 75k miles was a good run.





Cat:



Old struts:



Took the springs and shocks to the alignment shop and had them use their wall-mounted spring compressor to assemble these. The front springs are too short for the "suicide sticks" to be used and I wasn't about to use the spring perch as the bottom hooking location so yeah, did this the safe way.



At this point I wanted to give myself a break with the suspension work and went ahead and flushed the transmission fluid which requires the support plate to be removed.



I actually bought 4 bottles and ended up using 3.2 liters so good news there. It's not supposed to overflow but be 2-3 mm just below the fill hole. You can actually see the fluid level with a flashlight.



Removed the fill plug first.



Didn't look too bad but there are no records of it ever being changed. The new oil was much lighter in color than the maple syrup coming out.



Tapered plugs so no crush washers. 10 mm hex for the fill, T55 for the drain.



Pumpin'.



So now I'm trying to put the rears back on and there's just way too many things that need to happen at the same time. I tried for an hour, then decided to stop and wait for help to arrive. Conversely I got the fronts installed by myself in about 84 minutes.



The rear driver's side went in smoothly. Then went over to the passenger side and with my friend holding up the boot, he started moving it around when we discovered there was actually a tear. :rolleyes: Great, yet another thing to address.





Knocked off the caps and I don't know...this looks more like wheel bearing grease.





Kinda looks like raspberry jam, no? There's only one person who would dare give me the raspberry...



Absolute bloodbath.



Ordered new parts, new grease, pliers, and RTV. The factory sealant is like $150 and backordered in the US. Guessing dealers just use RTV like the rest of us.





Those pliers were too big for the snap ring holes so I had to go another route.



Removed the grease with Coleman fuel, then removed that residue with alcohol, and polished the outer race.



Reassembled the CV joint.



Packed it with grease.



Cleaned the holes with Q-tips to prevent grease getting on the threads.



RTV on the outer cap (also applied it to the inner one).



'twas a tight fit.



Now you may think to yourself, this looks correct:



We thought so too, but the outer race wasn't moving correctly. We thought maybe it needs to loosen up once all the grease gets everywhere and well, instead of spending a few minutes researching it, decided to install it on the diff and see if it actually moves correctly.

Spoiler alert: IT DOES NOT. The axle was sticking straight out like an 11th grade boner. So off it came and more time was spent cleaning the grease and removing the RTV. :eek:



Ordered more grease and a new snap ring (again).



THIS. This is how it's supposed to go together, where the half-circles are offset from each other. When I first assembled it, everything was aligned but the correct way is a little counter-intuitive.



Greased the spline on the axle and used the socket to drive the inner race back on.



Got new snap ring pliers where the tips were 0.070" in diameter. Worked like a charm this time around.



Tightened the outer clamp and fully assembled.





And we're in!

 

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Discussion Starter #49
Suspension Refresh & More

Tightening and torquing the ball joints.



Torquing the axle bolts was even more time consuming since I wanted to go in a star pattern, which meant engaging & disengaging the brake for every single one instead of 2 at a time. But hey, at least I had enough clearance to do so.



Here's me pushing on the wrench handle but having to hold myself with that crossbar to stop myself from sliding. :)



Marked the ones I actually torqued. Documentation: it's the name of the game.



The axle nut has a torque spec of 340 ft-lbs so went ahead and used this monstrosity with a 400 ft-lb capacity.



It uses a 3/4" drive which meant buying a new socket. Except it barely sticks out from the wheel. Oh wait, lemme get that 3/4" socket extension I don't have.



Fortunately the ratcheting head was big enough where I was still able to torque it without hitting the wheel, but I had to pull up while standing next to the rear bumper since that's the only way there was enough clearance from the body.



I gotta tell ya, after torquing the axle nut, the wheel bolts seemed like toys. :D

With the new shorter springs in the back, the assembly isn't under tension until the wheels are back on the ground and so you have to rotate the bearing while the car is being lowered and align the slots with the bolt heads.



All in all, it took 3 weekends and somewhere around 25 hours for all this work. I'm sure you're eager to see what it looks like but since there's no 2nd chance for a first impression, I'm gonna wait for the springs to settle a bit before posting a true before & after. It's only been 4 days so far. ;)

However, I have driven it and it is absolutely fantastic! The handling is significantly improved and it'll get thoroughly tested on my upcoming road trip.

A lot of work, but all worth it in the end.
 

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Re: Suspension Refresh & More

Awesome work. You seem to be doing all the same things that I have been doing to my 2010 Base.

Couple of questions for you:

The support plate that covers the transmission and requires removal to drain the fluid, is that connected to any of the suspension bits or is it strictly a cover?

I too installed some numeric cables. My install went smooth but still don't have perfect adjustment. I used the alignment tool which to me, positions the shifter off to the side rather than directly centered. I didn't pay attention to the stock setup but is that how yours look as well? Did you have any troubles with certain gears? The car shifts into every gear and runs fine...however moving out of 6th gear takes a lot more effort. My adjustments seem fine and I can't seem to figure it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Re: Suspension Refresh & More

Awesome work. You seem to be doing all the same things that I have been doing to my 2010 Base.

Couple of questions for you:

The support plate that covers the transmission and requires removal to drain the fluid, is that connected to any of the suspension bits or is it strictly a cover?

I too installed some numeric cables. My install went smooth but still don't have perfect adjustment. I used the alignment tool which to me, positions the shifter off to the side rather than directly centered. I didn't pay attention to the stock setup but is that how yours look as well? Did you have any troubles with certain gears? The car shifts into every gear and runs fine...however moving out of 6th gear takes a lot more effort. My adjustments seem fine and I can't seem to figure it out.
Thanks! Yeah I'm just going down the list of common repairs/upgrades.

The support plate is only tied to the chassis with 10 nuts, with 8 of them being attached to the "forks" that hold the toe link and control arm bushings, but the suspension parts themselves don't come into play. Those forks have permanent studs attached that are used for the nuts. The 2 diagonal braces are sandwiched between the nuts and the support plate, and you'll need to loosen the bolt that secures each plate to the chassis (just in front of the rear wheel). This allows each brace to bend down and then the support plate easily comes out. You don't need to completely remove the bolt.

As for the shifter, the alignment tool centered it nicely for me and I can't see how it'd be any different. Did you securely snap it into place before loosening the shifter? If not, I think it's possible that it wasn't truly centered, although there isn't that much play in how the tool attaches to the shifter assembly.

I have noticed that shifting from 5th into 6th can be an issue if I put any side load on the shift knob. It's not something I ever purposely do, but the stock shifter was more forgiving. I'm also hearing the lifter sound coming from what appears to be the front of the car, which is really just the sound echoing through the cables, even though I reused the rubber hose. But since the path from the transmission bracket to the bottom of the shifter is 100% metallic, having the rubber hose doesn't really matter. It still helps to thermally insulate it a bit, so it's worth doing, but there's nothing to dampen the sound. And unless I'm driving with the windows up and the radio off, I can't hear it.

Only thing I can recommend is having to readjust, knowing it can improve.
 

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As someone who recently picked up a 987.2 CS (you can see my thread in the competition section) this thread is awesome. I am currently going through so many of the same things.

I installed the numeric cables (stock ones snapped on my first drive) and also notice the increased noise. Double check that it's not just injector noise. I originally thought that it was lifters but then noticed the noise disappears when engine braking. Only present at idle or on throttle. I forgot how loud direct injection engines can be, lots of fuel pressure! (After I wrote this I realized your engine is not DFI... Still maybe you have loud injectors?)

My only issue with the shifter post install is 2nd can be a little tough to get in and out of. I played with the linkages on the transmission and noticed it's because the cable is being pulled in (towards the front of the car) and the selector over (to the passenger side) which causes the cable to be at a sharp angle. Might try putting a little white lithium grease on the cable where it slides in and out.. not sure it would help.

Thanks a ton for all the pictures and details!! I'm halfway through my coilover and front LCA install, AND I have some fresh trans fluid to put in so it looks like I'll be pulling off that plate. Your troubles are lessons learned for what to be careful about... And will be helpful if I break anything myself lol.

Right now I'm on the reinstallation for my rear passenger side and I'm struggling to get the LCA fitted back into the subframe. Can't seem to get it in. Luckily it's supposed to cool off over the next couple days so I'll be able to work on it some more.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
As someone who recently picked up a 987.2 CS (you can see my thread in the competition section) this thread is awesome. I am currently going through so many of the same things.

I installed the numeric cables (stock ones snapped on my first drive) and also notice the increased noise. Double check that it's not just injector noise. I originally thought that it was lifters but then noticed the noise disappears when engine braking. Only present at idle or on throttle. I forgot how loud direct injection engines can be, lots of fuel pressure! (After I wrote this I realized your engine is not DFI... Still maybe you have loud injectors?)

My only issue with the shifter post install is 2nd can be a little tough to get in and out of. I played with the linkages on the transmission and noticed it's because the cable is being pulled in (towards the front of the car) and the selector over (to the passenger side) which causes the cable to be at a sharp angle. Might try putting a little white lithium grease on the cable where it slides in and out.. not sure it would help.

Thanks a ton for all the pictures and details!! I'm halfway through my coilover and front LCA install, AND I have some fresh trans fluid to put in so it looks like I'll be pulling off that plate. Your troubles are lessons learned for what to be careful about... And will be helpful if I break anything myself lol.

Right now I'm on the reinstallation for my rear passenger side and I'm struggling to get the LCA fitted back into the subframe. Can't seem to get it in. Luckily it's supposed to cool off over the next couple days so I'll be able to work on it some more.
I was wondering who picked up that car...congrats! Our mileages are similar and both cars seem to be in good shape cosmetically. I'm using mine as a daily with the occasional canyon session thrown in. I may do a track day at some point too.

The ticking noise is there during engine-braking too so I'm fairly certain it's the lifters. Of course that's not to say the injectors couldn't use a cleaning but so far I'm OK with it.

Interesting to hear different variations of issues after installing the Numeric cables. I made sure to lay the new cables in the same config as stock. One sits on top of the other over the intake manifold and if you swap them, you may end up getting binding issues.

Yeah the rear installation of the strut assembly is a pain. I had to play around with the angle and the height of the carrier assembly to get the LCA installed. Took a lot of wiggling since the tolerances are pretty tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Exhaust Mod

I ended up going with the Carnewal catback exhaust mod instead of other aftermarket options. I didn't wanna deal with emission issues in California and felt the increased noise would be the right amount. It could be louder, but this is a nice balance of being somewhat low-key while also providing aural enhancement to the driving experience.



Since I was taking the exhaust off anyway, I also upgraded the tips with an X-pipe for better flow. Cleaning/polishing the tips at the end of the car wash always feels like the cherry on top. I usually don't like chrome, but they work here. These are double-walled and should remain shiny as long as I maintain them. The ones with a brushed stainless finish have a tendency to fade due to heat cycles.



I'll now direct your attention to this installation video, including sound clip comparisons.

 

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[I was wondering who picked up that car...congrats! Our mileages are similar and both cars seem to be in good shape cosmetically. I'm using mine as a daily with the occasional canyon session thrown in. I may do a track day at some point too.

The ticking noise is there during engine-braking too so I'm fairly certain it's the lifters. Of course that's not to say the injectors couldn't use a cleaning but so far I'm OK with it.

Interesting to hear different variations of issues after installing the Numeric cables. I made sure to lay the new cables in the same config as stock. One sits on top of the other over the intake manifold and if you swap them, you may end up getting binding issues.

Yeah the rear installation of the strut assembly is a pain. I had to play around with the angle and the height of the carrier assembly to get the LCA installed. Took a lot of wiggling since the tolerances are pretty tight.
Thank you! Mine is in decent shape cosmetically. Paint is definitely showing its age, I have some dings and lots of chips but the paint correction I did helped a lot. Interior is in very good shape, though. Just some scratching of the paint on the plastics in a few spots.

Makes sense about the lifters. The DFI injectors click so loud that I can barely hear any valve train noise in comparison.

I did try to replicate the stock routing as well. Really my issue is very minor.

The rear is definitely a huge pain compared to the front, though the one I've done has gone a bit smoother than yours. I ended up getting it back in with some assistance from my prybar and mini sledge.
 

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I ended up going with the Carnewal catback exhaust mod instead of other aftermarket options. I didn't wanna deal with emission issues in California and felt the increased noise would be the right amount. It could be louder, but this is a nice balance of being somewhat low-key while also providing aural enhancement to the driving experience.

Since I was taking the exhaust off anyway, I also upgraded the tips with an X-pipe for better flow. Cleaning/polishing the tips at the end of the car wash always feels like the cherry on top. I usually don't like chrome, but they work here. These are double-walled and should remain shiny as long as I maintain them. The ones with a brushed stainless finish have a tendency to fade due to heat cycles.


I'll now direct your attention to this installation video, including sound clip comparisons.
Nice choice! I was looking at those myself. I picked up some track headers cheap the other day so I'm installing those while I'm back there too. California emissions may be a problem, but the headers are pretty easy to get to. I'm also kinda hoping it'll pass so long as I don't get any codes... haha.
 

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Re: Suspension Refresh & More

As for the shifter, the alignment tool centered it nicely for me and I can't see how it'd be any different. Did you securely snap it into place before loosening the shifter? If not, I think it's possible that it wasn't truly centered, although there isn't that much play in how the tool attaches to the shifter assembly.

I have noticed that shifting from 5th into 6th can be an issue if I put any side load on the shift knob. It's not something I ever purposely do, but the stock shifter was more forgiving. I'm also hearing the lifter sound coming from what appears to be the front of the car, which is really just the sound echoing through the cables, even though I reused the rubber hose. But since the path from the transmission bracket to the bottom of the shifter is 100% metallic, having the rubber hose doesn't really matter. It still helps to thermally insulate it a bit, so it's worth doing, but there's nothing to dampen the sound. And unless I'm driving with the windows up and the radio off, I can't hear it.

Only thing I can recommend is having to readjust, knowing it can improve.
Thanks for the info, I guess I'll be doing the tranny fluid soon then. I threw my alignment tool on and it places the shifter a little more to the right (in relation to the center of the radio screen) then dead center. I guess it could just be play in the bushings as well since I do have 65K on it. I have noticed that if I rev match properly, while still a little difficult, it is slightly easier to shift out of 6th to 5th. Kind of strange to me.

My only issue with the shifter post install is 2nd can be a little tough to get in and out of. I played with the linkages on the transmission and noticed it's because the cable is being pulled in (towards the front of the car) and the selector over (to the passenger side) which causes the cable to be at a sharp angle. Might try putting a little white lithium grease on the cable where it slides in and out.. not sure it would help.
I have a similar issue with 6th gear. Curious if my issue is caused by where the cables overlap running from the center console through the firewall. It's been so hot lately that i haven't had the drive to work on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Steering Wheel Upgrade

The stock steering wheel is pretty thin and uninspiring. So I upgraded it with one from DCT Motorsports while keeping the stock airbag. I do think the newer, circular airbags look more modern (well, because they are) but given how nice this one looks, not even concerned about it. It's all about how it feels and the driving experience, which in this case has been dramatically improved.

Black with gray stitching to match the rest of the interior.





Old wheel:



Now admittedly I had trouble popping the airbag out. There's a hole in the bottom where you need to stick a screwdriver or T30 driver to push up against a spring, and then it should just pop loose. But I wasn't careful and didn't pull straight out, so it got stuck. I ended up breaking the brittle plastic trim piece but fortunately with the other 2 posts that hold it in, and the fact that it's sitting on leather, there are no rattles or any issues at all really, so I didn't replace it. If the wheel has buttons on it, might be a different story.



Had a buddy come over and we managed to get it seated again, then it went much smoother. Once the airbag is out, you'll see this plate that has 4 screws holding it in. Flipping it over reveals how the springs works, and how it releases the 4 "fingers" on the back of the airbag. I ended up using a T25 in the end. Don't use a regular screwdriver as you want something with a blunt face.



And this is how it operates when pushing the spring clip from the bottom:



Remove the M12 triple square bolt holding in the wheel.



I was able to torque it down to spec (50 Nm) since I had help.



And he we are! Highly recommended. :)

 

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Re: Steering Wheel Upgrade

The new wheel looks excellent, congrats! I really like the side contours for your thumbs.

Also appreciate the how-to instructions!
 
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