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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I have been reading the various threads discussing the cayman. Its a car that has really interested me. Ive been a ferrari driver the last several years and am thinking to make a switch. Ive never owned Porsche cars, the ferraris are amazing, loud, brash and fast. To me the Porsches seem more precise, understated but secretly fast!
Im looking to get in to a cayman, I have read the PDK sagas, the electronics problems and have a question regarding model years.
I prefer a manual car, and prefer to do some performance modifications on my cars. Im thinking about an 08-09 manual S car. Are there major differences in the motors between 08-10? I know the new R model is a bit upgraded but prefer an older model I can change as Id like to.

I know this has been asked, IVe read some of the replies but with the 2011-12 models out Id like opinions and what people have seen in their cars now out 4-5 years.
Thank you and I look forward to a new garage spot!
Nd
 

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I own a slightly modded 2006 Cayman S...and I hate it. I consider myself a car guy, which means I would like to experience something else every 3-4 years, but I can't get myself to get rid of my Cayman. It's simply that much of a joy to own. I can't say it's been problem free, but I've yet to own a car that is.
 

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The '09 Cayman S had a completely different motor..the 9A1. It no longer has the dreaded IMS.
 

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big differences from '08 to '09- aside from the power bump and DI others mentioned the 9A1 block does not have an Intermediate Shaft or Rear Main Seal which have been problem areas of the previous block. RMS not a big deal to fix the leak, more of an annoyance but an IMS bearing failure means you need a whole new engine and at $15k+ to replace it might sway your decision, no matter how rare or infrequent the occurance. You also have somewhat upgraded materials in the cabin (buttons on the 06-08 cars can wear prematurly) and a revised suspension that some say is more compliant. Direct Injection comes with it's own headaches, look into carbon deposits on the intake valves, and the High Pressure fuel pumps can be a another weak point but usually it's fixed w/ a replacement and arent too expensive. Other then that LCD lights in the rear of the newer cars and a slightly different front end facia. Oh and different wheel designs. I think that covers it. Did I miss anything? Oh yeah the '09+ models are considerably more expensive (around 10k+) beyond what you might expect for just being a year newer.
 

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The '09 Cayman S had a completely different motor..the 9A1. It no longer has the dreaded IMS.
I don't understand why this "quasi-myth" continues to be perpetrated. Yes, there have been some cars that suffered from IMS failures, but to raise it to the status of "the dreaded IMS" as if it were the plague is just unnecessary hyperbole. You really don't what the OP to leave Ferrari and move to Porsche, do you?
Although I have never seen the data on how many Caymans that have had (both necessarily and as a precaution) the IMS replaced I would put money on the table that it is a fraction of a percent. It needs to be kept in perspective.
Oh...and driving a Ferrari is problem free?
 

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the 9A1 block does not have an.... Rear Main Seal which have been problem areas of the previous block.
What? How an earth do they seal the crankshaft then and still connect the flywheel to it??
The RMS is not even a complete redesign but a minor change I believe between the M97 and 9A1.

I agree with drPhilGandini as well that the IMS is not the issue that it can be made out to be on the forums. The 2nd Gen 09- models have a better oil system and so for somebody that is looking for a track car that would be the one to take, but for street driving and occasional track events the Gen 1's do just fine as long as you don't go with modified LCA's, ARB's, slicks etc. which can definately cause oil starvation.


Err.....i must have missed this PDK saga, what exactly is it ?
Again this is a web thing. I know many owners with PDK that have had no issues and the dealer has not had that many problems with them. Two of my friends have had their PDK transmissions replaced under warranty due to internal electronic issues.
 

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One post, a first post, and no follow up on an interesting, albeit strange subject - a move from a Ferrari to a Cayman and a previously owned one at that.

Troll anyone? :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
One post, a first post, and no follow up on an interesting, albeit strange subject - a move from a Ferrari to a Cayman and a previously owned one at that.

Troll anyone? :eek:
Wow, thanks for the preconceived welcome there singletrack. Truly a warming first experience on this board. I guess what people told me about this place showed its teeth quickly. You smell a troll? I work over 100 hours a week, I dont have all day to sit around on chat boards.

For the rest that responded thank you for the replies. Ive owned mid engine ferraris for the last few years. I love the cars, I prefer a well sorted, PPI car versus newer models. Why would I pay such a HUGE premium on a car to have to sort it out? With ferraris, the cars that bring the bigger money are well driven, well maintianed, well sorted and very well documented cars that have their problems shaken out. They are tempremental, expensive and demand upkeep. My car has had over $40,000 maintaining it over its life and I really dont have it in me to spend for the next major service. The belt changes alone are $8-12,000 if you dont find anything "major" in the engine. My car is a limited number (80 produced) car that requires the engine to be pulled for its service. My previous cars were also older models. I grew up a motorcycle drag and cart racer, I miss the carts and thought the first time I tested a Cayman that I felt like it was a car i could race for fun and do track days as well as drive to the office comfortably. I have also looked and driven 928s, 930's the new 911 GT2 and really like the cars a lot. Depreciation is better on the GT cars obviously, but I like the balance and the cart feel of the cayman. I also like the look of the car. Just my choice. I can get in to another ferrari, but wanted to try something different for a bit. The 430 is a fantastic car, but at $230,000 and up, its a bit. I like working on my own cars, modding and enhancing performance without changing the original character of the car. ALso selling a ferrari, getting a porsche and keeping $20,000 in my pocket for mods doesnt seem like a bad day does it?
Driving an older ferrari is a process. From the engine temp warmings, the transmision warming, etc, its an event just to drive the thing. Was looking for something a little less maintenance. Turn the key and go, not spend 30 minutes like youre warming up an F1 car.
I have looked at the 09-10's as well,Thank you for telling me about the gen I vs Gen II engines. Love the new Cayman R. Its one I may consider springing for new as the previous model years have had some issues, but nothing catastrophic. When youre used to a radiator costing over $4,000 each and there are 3 in the car, a bearing problem is nothing! I think Ill stick to 09 and up here, perhaps look at the new R. Any reviews on people who own them?
Thank you again for all your input, cant wait to get in to the new car.
Nd.
 

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With your cart background, I would suspect that you will love taking the Cayman to the track. That being said I would stick with a Gen II DFI engine. I've have taken my Spyder to the track a ton and no oiling issues. I had my PDK replaced under warranty early on and no problems since so I can understand your perspective on getting a car that has already been sorted out. Since you like working on your car, you'll appreciate all the do it yourself articles you'll find here. I do some of the maintenance myself (changing out rotors, pad and brake fluid). I get oil changes at the dealership mainly for warranty documentation purposes. Look forward to your perspective on the Cayman vs. Ferrari.
 

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My experience, limited though it is, has been all positive. The car has < 5000 miles, and I've been to DE's @ Rd ATL and Carolina Motorsports Park. The CMP event brought two instructors & two R's from the Porsche Sport Driving School at Barber. They were better drivers than I am, but I knew the track better than they did. After passing me, I tucked in behind one and easily kept up.

Search this site. The word is that there are no new R's in the pipeline, so you'll want to consider the available inventory already on the ground.

Good luck. Spend some time on Planet 9 (poetic, no?); you'll learn a lot about these cars.

Best of luck in your search for the right car.

John
 

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I don't understand why this "quasi-myth" continues to be perpetrated. Yes, there have been some cars that suffered from IMS failures, but to raise it to the status of "the dreaded IMS" as if it were the plague is just unnecessary hyperbole. You really don't what the OP to leave Ferrari and move to Porsche, do you?
Although I have never seen the data on how many Caymans that have had (both necessarily and as a precaution) the IMS replaced I would put money on the table that it is a fraction of a percent. It needs to be kept in perspective.
Oh...and driving a Ferrari is problem free?
Hey Doc, keep sipping the Koolaid. The IMS is a design flaw and if Porsche didn't think so, why did they go to the considerable time and expense to eliminate it? I could care less whether the OP leaves Ferrari. Never owned one, probably never will but I am driving my seventh Porsche.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
With your cart background, I would suspect that you will love taking the Cayman to the track. That being said I would stick with a Gen II DFI engine. I've have taken my Spyder to the track a ton and no oiling issues. I had my PDK replaced under warranty early on and no problems since so I can understand your perspective on getting a car that has already been sorted out. Since you like working on your car, you'll appreciate all the do it yourself articles you'll find here. I do some of the maintenance myself (changing out rotors, pad and brake fluid). I get oil changes at the dealership mainly for warranty documentation purposes. Look forward to your perspective on the Cayman vs. Ferrari.

My thoughts as well, I really like the raw power of the 997's but there is something about a true mid engine and winding it out thats awesome. I have full race headers catless to a tubi in the current F car along with some other mods, that make the car sound like an F1 beast unleahsed. I dont know if Id get the same feeling in a cayman, but I think Ill enjoy finding out. My business partner runs in the corvette series with a 700HP car and its just rediculous. I have 2 binders of documentation on the cars and it provides a good amount of return at selling time.
 

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Wow, thanks for the preconceived welcome there singletrack. Truly a warming first experience on this board. I guess what people told me about this place showed its teeth quickly. You smell a troll? I work over 100 hours a week, I dont have all day to sit around on chat boards.

For the rest that responded thank you for the replies. Ive owned mid engine ferraris for the last few years. I love the cars, I prefer a well sorted, PPI car versus newer models. Why would I pay such a HUGE premium on a car to have to sort it out? With ferraris, the cars that bring the bigger money are well driven, well maintianed, well sorted and very well documented cars that have their problems shaken out. They are tempremental, expensive and demand upkeep. My car has had over $40,000 maintaining it over its life and I really dont have it in me to spend for the next major service. The belt changes alone are $8-12,000 if you dont find anything "major" in the engine. My car is a limited number (80 produced) car that requires the engine to be pulled for its service. My previous cars were also older models. I grew up a motorcycle drag and cart racer, I miss the carts and thought the first time I tested a Cayman that I felt like it was a car i could race for fun and do track days as well as drive to the office comfortably. I have also looked and driven 928s, 930's the new 911 GT2 and really like the cars a lot. Depreciation is better on the GT cars obviously, but I like the balance and the cart feel of the cayman. I also like the look of the car. Just my choice. I can get in to another ferrari, but wanted to try something different for a bit. The 430 is a fantastic car, but at $230,000 and up, its a bit. I like working on my own cars, modding and enhancing performance without changing the original character of the car. ALso selling a ferrari, getting a porsche and keeping $20,000 in my pocket for mods doesnt seem like a bad day does it?
Driving an older ferrari is a process. From the engine temp warmings, the transmision warming, etc, its an event just to drive the thing. Was looking for something a little less maintenance. Turn the key and go, not spend 30 minutes like youre warming up an F1 car.
I have looked at the 09-10's as well,Thank you for telling me about the gen I vs Gen II engines. Love the new Cayman R. Its one I may consider springing for new as the previous model years have had some issues, but nothing catastrophic. When youre used to a radiator costing over $4,000 each and there are 3 in the car, a bearing problem is nothing! I think Ill stick to 09 and up here, perhaps look at the new R. Any reviews on people who own them?
Thank you again for all your input, cant wait to get in to the new car.
Nd.
Hey, we get them from time to time so don't be offended by the suspicion. As to a review of an R - well I have one and love it but it's no Ferrari so it is unlikely you will get the same "feeling" in the Cayman. You certainly won't get the same parking spot ;)

Your reasoning for wanting the Cayman however, is sound. It is an infinitely more practical car than the Ferrari in every way you have mentioned. I have 1,000 miles on my R now and it has been flawless. You certainly could not go wrong with an R...but all the Cayman incarnations are great cars if you are into modifications - as your post suggests.

Sadly...with your work schedule, you'll likely never get to track the car...

Welcome to the forum and I hope you find the Cayman you are looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hey, we get them from time to time so don't be offended by the suspicion. As to a review of an R - well I have one and love it but it's no Ferrari so it is unlikely you will get the same "feeling" in the Cayman. You certainly won't get the same parking spot ;)

Your reasoning for wanting the Cayman however, is sound. It is an infinitely more practical car than the Ferrari in every way you have mentioned. I have 1,000 miles on my R now and it has been flawless. You certainly could not go wrong with an R...but all the Cayman incarnations are great cars if you are into modifications - as your post suggests.

Sadly...with your work schedule, you'll likely never get to track the car...

Welcome to the forum and I hope you find the Cayman you are looking for.
Thank you for the reply...<handshake> and a smile. Cars bring everyone together eh?
Nd
 
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