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I rinsed my car off a few days ago with a garden hose when it was getting late because of all the salt on it (geniuses in NC gov decided to dump it everywhere and we never say a speck of ice or snow) and woke up the next morning to find it was covered in a sheet of ice. No problem... had this happen plenty before, so I brought out the hot water to unfreeze the door so I could get inside.

I sat down, started the car, and saw the windshield was covered with ice as well. Without giving it a thought, I engaged the wipers (chunks of ice on them)... raspy creaking sound ensued and I cringed 'oh **** shouldn't have done that.' I used hot water to melt the ice on the windshield and drove to work (the brakes were stuck and/or tires to the ground, so had to 'rock' the car out the driveway).

The windshield looked fine, but later looking through it at the right angle, I could see light reflects tiny 'swirl-like' marks from the wipers grazing the glass, as they bounced up and down the frozen windshield. Not noticeable unless you're looking for it and doesn't really both me (the windshield will eventually get plenty of imperfections), but maybe this will help someone from repeating the same mistake. Ironically, I know not to use wipers on frozen windshields from the same experience in previous cars, but I guess rushing to work has its toll.
 

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Sorry to hear of the run-in with Old Man Winter. On mornings where I don't have time to properly warm up the car ( running for 20 to 30 minutes ), and where conditions would appear to warrant "scraping" the windscreen (I would never!), I head out with several Nalgene bottles of very hot water (from the tap). I fire up the car, and pour the hot water (slowly) over the parts that need to be ice free, starting with the upper windshield. Been using this technique successfully for years in more wintry places than NC. In general, it works in moderately cold temperatures. For serious cold though, the water will just re-freeze if the car is not warmed up. The good thing about serious cold is that in general, when the serious cold sets in, there's not a lot of moisture in the air. ;-)
 

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I always read somewhere or was warned that pouring hot water over an ice covered windshield could very possibly cause it to crack. Might be worth checking before continuing the practice.:cheers:
 

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Here is the Frozen White North we have windshield washer fluid readily available that is rated for up to -45 Celsius. The brand I use is also touted as having an ice melting formula...which works brilliantly if sprayed liberally on an icy windshield. No scraping required...and no scratches on the windshield. It probably wreaks havoc with the wiper blade "rubber," but they're a consumable that get replaced yearly anyway. And no...the fluid is not Porsche certified...but I've used it on both cars the last two winters (up to 4 litres a week In the GTS; about half that in the CS) with no apparent ill effects on the windshield, the trims surrounding it or the headlights.

I expect any winter fluid designed to be used in sub-freezing temperatures would have some ice melting properties...I'd just spray the heck outa the windshield with the wipers on (keep spraying...more...more...ice gone? No? Spray some more). In severe situations where a little scraping may be required, my default the last 20 years has been to use a credit card rather than a hard plastic scraper...works like a charm, especially when washer fluid has already loosened things up. And I always have a credit card handy...not the case with a scraper. :)
 

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One fine morning 30 years ago I went out to scrape the windshield (no gloves) and warm up the car. Took out a credit card and started scraping the hard, hard frost off. After a few short minutes, I noticed that my fingers and hand were painfully cold, so I just hurried along.
On the way to work that morning I heard the radio weather guy say, "And today's low is in Stafford Springs, with 16 below (-26C)."
No artificial melting fluids were used .... or available.
 

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I realize that it NC you may not be used to sub freezing temperatures as we are further north.
you should always lift your wipers off the windshield if icy conditions are expected. Consumable or not, the blades are not cheap.
Porsche also reccommends adding antifreeze to their wper fluid in a percentage "listed on the label". Since I do not drive my car in the winter, I have not checked the label to see how much that is. There is really only one down side I can think of to using a commercially available winter washer blend; any that lands on the car will strip a small amount of any wax you have applied. This trade off seems like a no brainer decision in the winter. Oh, and don't engage the wipers until the ice on the windshield has mostly melted from the defrosters.
Using warm water on a frozen windshield is a bad idea; although the glass is tempered, it can cause any micro pits or cracks to expand.
 
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