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I think the only issue with not driving the car is keeping the battery charged. Back in the day when I raced, my dedicated race car saw no street miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
I generally agree, but nonuse breeds entropy, and if you had the chance to periodically drive the car for more than ten miles or so, all systems would benefit. Shorter than that is harmful. For most of the years that I road raced, we lived in the country. I tried to surreptitiously drive whatever dedicated race car I had on seldom-used backcountry paved roads between races. Much easier to pull off in a BMW sedan, I found out, than in a formula car.
 

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I generally agree, but nonuse breeds entropy, and if you had the chance to periodically drive the car for more than ten miles or so, all systems would benefit. Shorter than that is harmful. For most of the years that I road raced, we lived in the country. I tried to surreptitiously drive whatever dedicated race car I had on seldom-used backcountry paved roads between races. Much easier to pull off in a BMW sedan, I found out, than in a formula car.
Thanks for the advice guys. Whenever I take the car out I drive it to bring the coolant and oil to operating temps and turn on sport mode only after the oil has reached 190+ degrees to open up the oil cooler and circulate the oil in there as well. The problem is that I travel for work and sometimes I don't move the car from the garage for 2-3 weeks at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Thanks for the advice guys. Whenever I take the car out I drive it to bring the coolant and oil to operating temps and turn on sport mode only after the oil has reached 190+ degrees to open up the oil cooler and circulate the oil in there as well. The problem is that I travel for work and sometimes I don't move the car from the garage for 2-3 weeks at a time.
I am always walking the line between enlightened mindfulness and low-grade OCD. My fight is to own the car and not have the car own me. Trickle charge it, avoid ethanol if you can, maybe pump the tires up to ameliorate flat spotting, be generally aware of the issue, and it should be just fine.
 

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I have been thinking about this topic and researching race and high performance oils for the past week. Here are my lay conclusions for what they are worth.

My goal is maximum metal to metal contact protection under high revs and temps, accompanied by no or minimal cat damage. That is the top priority. I don’t care about friction reduction unless in achieving that no other objective sought is compromised. I want a relatively simple protocol that does not involve race oil flushes after each track day.

There is a wealth of misinformation about race oils coming both from oil companies and the internet. The most credible source I have found is an unbiased mechanical engineer who posts at 540ratblog.wordpress.com/.

He scientifically tests various oils and publishes a frequently-updated oil wear protection ranking. In this he expresses wear ratings in psi. The higher the psi number the better.

He also tries to quantify the amount of phosphorus in the tested oils. Phosphorus is what eats cats.

He does not test for friction reduction, which, admittedly, is a positive in an oil intended for track or race use if every fraction of a second counts. It use to count for me when I road raced. I don’t care so much about that for track days.

My search is for the highest psi rating in an oil that does not contain so much phosphorus that it will destroy cats—-anything over about 800 ppm—-and which also contains sufficient levels of “street use” additives to minimize acid formation, carbon deposits, sludge buildup, air bubbles and foam. Also important is a reasonably high thermal breakdown temperature consistent with track day uses in a 981.

To make a long story short, the oil best meeting these parameters I have found is 0W-40 MOBIL 1 FS European Car Formula.

This “street oil’ was ranked number 3 in a very long list of oils tested (including marquee “race oils”) for wear protection under the temp and rev stress that have been discussed in this thread. Thermal breakdown for this oil was noted at 280 degrees, a high number. And at 275 degrees,the wear protection rating was still outstanding as he ranked them—-much higher than many well-known race oils with high levels of ZDDP even at the standard test temp of 230 degrees for those race oils.

Motul 300 tested very well too and was ranked just below this in wear protection rating, but was noted to have too much phosphorus for extended cat life. BillL223, an estimable source for sure, has not experienced this, but the science is against him here. I choose that over anecdotal evidence.

With the parameters expressed above, where I end up on this is to use 0W-40 MOBIL 1 European Car oil and test it periodically after a track day or two to determine quality. I will try to maintain engine oil temp in the 220-230 range—-if necessary, by enlarged sump, third rad or bigger oil cooler or just not pushing it so hard especially on long straights like the front or back straights at Road America.

If I choose to push harder and stress the motor more, this is among the very best oils to do it with.

I encourage anyone interested to read the oil blog referenced above.

If anyone has input on this I would like to hear it. These issues really matter, there are lots of opinions out there, and we all benefit from solid information.
RAT/540 has expressed the characteristics of oil protection that M97 engines on the track need. Lets not confuse 9A1 engines here, they fit into another tread to really protect them at the track. M97 engines heads have only 2 scavanger pumps so oil accumulation is very possible depending on G forces against the natural gravity flow to scavanger pumps then to the sump. That said, oil starvation can exist in various forms, such as complete starvation, partial starvation, lower oil pressures, oil with foam mixture and very hot engine well above it operating temp causing oil film breakdown. The Cayman 987.1 does not have engine oil tempature, oil pressure or an accurate water tempature gauge so we just assume all is ok.

Our engines need an oil that can funtion in all of these situations. Rod bearing scarring mimics flat tappet boundry layer breakdown in RAT/540 engine oil discussion and remedies. Mobil 1 FS 0W-40 does a great job in many catigories to protect our motors as a very reasonable price. It does not contain ZDDP, which in high levels can destroy your catalyactic converters. The PSI to break down the boundry layer of the oil is extremely high and even in tempature above 280 degrees, the PSI breakdown level is still extraordinary. Viscosity is good and stays that way even in the hotest usage. So the only area where Mobil 1 FS 0W-40 is lacking is in foam formation, which is not ranked here.

I want to thank dcharnet for this oil review as its very pertinent to our engine life on the track.
 

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I had a Boxster S drive to the track car. Bought it with 100K, tracked it primarily at CoTA on 200TW tires with a spec boxster like suspension, 1/2 qt sump, EBS baffle. I put 10K track miles in that car over several years. Used Amsoil 20W/50 Racing Oil. Sold it 18mo ago.
Just bought an 06S Cayman. Will replicate oiling and suspension and hope for the same results.
 
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