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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Figuring out the jacking points and procedure for getting a new car up on jack stands is always a bit intimidating the first time around, so I thought I would share the procedure I used. While my previous 986 could be put on four jack stands with only two jack lifts, the 981 takes three.

Safe Harbor Statement - When using these instructions, you are responsible for your car and for your safety and not me. If you do not feel comfortable or safe putting your car on jack stands - - - do not attempt it.

Tools:
  1. 2 ton minimum low profile jack
  2. 4 jack stands that securely fit the 981 jack points (see picture of my modified stands for Porsche jack points)
  3. 2 wooden 4x6 blocks with a nonskid service on one side
  4. Hockey puck or small wooden block to place between the jack lift saddle and your jack point

Procedure used:
  1. Get all of your tools ready and read the full instructions before starting. Take it slow and easy until you are comfortable with each step.
  2. Jack up driver’s side using rear jack point and put jack stand under front jack point.
  3. Place 4x6 wooden block under driver’s side rear tire, slowly lowering the car down until it is securely supported. I modified some 4x6” blocks buy sanding the side that faces the floor and using some nonskid stair tread covering on top. The blocks become self-adjusting as the nonskid grips the tire and the bottom of the block will slide some to accommodate movement
  4. Repeat on passenger side
  5. Move to rear and jack under rear sway bar mounting point (aft part of the rear sub frame), remove wooden blocks, lower onto jack stands at both rear jack points.
  6. Congratulate yourself for understanding more about your new ride and learning how to properly take care of her.
:beer:
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Adding photo of rear jack point used. :)

I also found a rear jack point adapter on line (see photo). If you look at the support structure above it, let's just say that you're a braver man (or woman) than I if you use this as your primary lift point. :eek:
 

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Very useful information, Terry989. Would you consider submitting this as an article to be added to our archives? Thanks!
 

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So there is no front central jacking point?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Very useful information, Terry989. Would you consider submitting this as an article to be added to our archives? Thanks!
I'd be happy to submit this, just let me know what I need to do.
 

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Just click on the "Articles" link at the top of the page. There's a tutorial on how to submit an article. Pretty easy to do, it's very similar to creating a new forum post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So there is no front central jacking point?
See attached photo of the factory front jack point location. This is the one to use if you need to get a single wheel off for work, but not the best to jack from if you want to get the car up on jack stands. The problem is that if you put the rear half of the car on the stands first, there is no good front location to use to lift the entire front of the car up and set it down on stands. You have a few different lift point options under the rear sub frame structure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There is a central point that looks substantial enough to use to jack the front up. However, it is covered by the bottom panels.

Bruce
Correct. You can lift on the front suspension sub frame (see photo) as it is very strong and has a number of flat, safe places to lift on. Unless you need to take the forward bottom panel off for a reason (lots of screws/fasteners), it is just much faster to do the final lift from the rear of the car.
 

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Thanks for sharing this with us.
 

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Correct. You can lift on the front suspension sub frame (see photo) as it is very strong and has a number of flat, safe places to lift on. Unless you need to take the forward bottom panel off for a reason (lots of screws/fasteners), it is just much faster to do the final lift from the rear of the car.
Great detail picture of the suspension, is that from a Porsche publication?
 

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Unless the new cars are different from the older models, and I have not heard/read they are, the only approved ways to lift these cars is via their tires/wheels or using rubber coated lift pads the body lift points.

Using any other "lift" points is just wrong.

Like picking a puppy up by its ears. You can get the animal off the ground but it is not the proper way to lift the animal.

If you're going to work on these cars and ramps are not sufficient invest in a lift. You do not have to get a fancy professioal lift, but get one that can support the car at its 4 lift points safely and high enough to get under/work under the car.

Set aside the jack stands to use for an old beater Ford F-150 which is about the last vehicle jack stands were good for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Great detail picture of the suspension, is that from a Porsche publication?
They are great pictures and aid in understanding the suspension and structures. For instance, from the photo it looks like replacing the front sway bar may no longer be as simple as before. I can't see any way of doing it without dropping the entire front sub frame. On my 986, it took some effort to replace, but not this much. On the plus side, for the 981, you can still replace the sway bar bushings from the wheel well with the tire off.

It is from a Porsche publication, here is the link: Chassis - Features - Boxster S - Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG

Now that you have seen the front sub frame, you have to see the rear! What a beauty!! :)
 

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Correct. You can lift on the front suspension sub frame (see photo) as it is very strong and has a number of flat, safe places to lift on....
I don't agree with this assessment unless you can substantiate what "very strong" means. I don't see any place there that I would use to lift a corner share of the weight of our cars on. Many of the elements are simply stamped sheet metal, and are great in tension, but have little strength in compression or bending loads.
I don't think I've ever seen a Porsche lifted at the front by a single jacking point. I have seen racing Caymans lifted at the rear in the center (at Rennsport Reunion) and some here have talked about lifting where the rear link locates toward the center of the car (per photo posted above.)
Still, if someone wants to jack up a Cayman/Boxster at the front with a single jack and take a photo, I stand to be corrected (and amazed!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I don't agree with this assessment unless you can substantiate what "very strong" means. I don't see any place there that I would use to lift a corner share of the weight of our cars on. Many of the elements are simply stamped sheet metal, and are great in tension, but have little strength in compression or bending loads.
I don't think I've ever seen a Porsche lifted at the front by a single jacking point. I have seen racing Caymans lifted at the rear in the center (at Rennsport Reunion) and some here have talked about lifting where the rear link locates toward the center of the car (per photo posted above.)
I doubt you will see people jacking from the front since there is really no need to do it from there as you first need to remove the under body panel. I can also assure you that it is strong enough, as the cross member is cast and machined, not stamped. I have attached actual pictures of front 986 cross member and from the top view, you can clearly see that it is cast. I also lift a BMW 128 and Mercedes C230 from the front sub frame, and both of these are heavier cars.

At the rear, I lift on one of rear sub frame uprights while some recommend the lift point further after - - - the one that lift point adapter is made for. If you worried about a stamped piece, this should worry you even more when you look at the image of what is supporting the car!
:)
 

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... Still, if someone wants to jack up a Cayman/Boxster at the front with a single jack and take a photo, I stand to be corrected (and amazed!)
3 points awarded for the pun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Unless the new cars are different from the older models, and I have not heard/read they are, the only approved ways to lift these cars is via their tires/wheels or using rubber coated lift pads the body lift points.
Yes, I know this is one school of thought that you should only do what is approved by Porsche. If you follow this entirely, then remember that Porsche only approves:
  • N-Spec tires (not the always the best for performance and track/auto-x)
  • Porsche factory batteries
  • Wheel sizes and offsets that come from the factory
  • No brake upgrades that don't come from the factory
  • No coil overs
  • No larger throttle bodies
  • No aftermarket exhaust systems
  • Definitely no ECU flashes
  • etc - - -

My SA even told me that I should highly consider buying the maintenance plan as the 981 was too complicated to be worked on by the home enthusiast. I decided not to drink the kool-aid. :)

Remember that I did preface the entire thread with "If you do not feel comfortable or safe putting your car on jack stands - - - do not attempt it." A statement that I firmly stand behind.
 

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Figuring out the jacking points and procedure for getting a new car up on jack stands is always a bit intimidating the first time around, so I thought I would share the procedure I used. While my previous 986 could be put on four jack stands with only two jack lifts, the 981 takes three.

Safe Harbor Statement - When using these instructions, you are responsible for your car and for your safety and not me. If you do not feel comfortable or safe putting your car on jack stands - - - do not attempt it.

Tools:
  1. 2 ton minimum low profile jack
  2. 4 jack stands that securely fit the 981 jack points (see picture of my modified stands for Porsche jack points)
  3. 2 wooden 4x6 blocks with a nonskid service on one side
  4. Hockey puck or small wooden block to place between the jack lift saddle and your jack point

Procedure used:
  1. Get all of your tools ready and read the full instructions before starting. Take it slow and easy until you are comfortable with each step.
  2. Jack up driver’s side using rear jack point and put jack stand under front jack point.
  3. Place 4x6 wooden block under driver’s side rear tire, slowly lowering the car down until it is securely supported. I modified some 4x6” blocks buy sanding the side that faces the floor and using some nonskid stair tread covering on top. The blocks become self-adjusting as the nonskid grips the tire and the bottom of the block will slide some to accommodate movement
  4. Repeat on passenger side
  5. Move to rear and jack under rear sway bar mounting point (aft part of the rear sub frame), remove wooden blocks, lower onto jack stands at both rear jack points.
  6. Congratulate yourself for understanding more about your new ride and learning how to properly take care of her.
:beer:
You don't crawl under the car with it up on jack stands like that do you?
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You don't crawl under the car with it up on jack stands like that do you?
If you are referring to the height off the ground, I used the lowest setting in the photo since I needed the car up just high enough to get the wheels off this time. I use a higher settings on the stands if I want to do work under the car.

If you are referring to safety, I never crawl under the car using a only a jack, just once the jack stands are in place. The jack stands support 6,000 lbs, while the car weights 3,000 lbs (well, 2,800 lbs with the wheels off :)), so there is plenty of margin. I use a level surface, and have customized the top surface or each jack stand with a rubber pad and pin that fits into the slot of each jack point (insurance to keep the car from accidentally sliding off the jack).

When working on my wife's BMW, I change to another set of homemade adapters that fit into lift points on the BMW. I took the stock jack stands, drilled and tapped them each for a screw in order to safely and quickly customize them for the job.

Low tech, inexpensive, versatile, safe!
 

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Yes, I know this is one school of thought that you should only do what is approved by Porsche. If you follow this entirely, then remember that Porsche only approves:
  • N-Spec tires (not the always the best for performance and track/auto-x)
  • Porsche factory batteries
  • Wheel sizes and offsets that come from the factory
  • No brake upgrades that don't come from the factory
  • No coil overs
  • No larger throttle bodies
  • No aftermarket exhaust systems
  • Definitely no ECU flashes
  • etc - - -

My SA even told me that I should highly consider buying the maintenance plan as the 981 was too complicated to be worked on by the home enthusiast. I decided not to drink the kool-aid. :)

Remember that I did preface the entire thread with "If you do not feel comfortable or safe putting your car on jack stands - - - do not attempt it." A statement that I firmly stand behind.
AFIAK Porsche does not sanction its cars for tracking. Since you are venturing into unsanctioned usage going with any tire your heart desires is on your head.

All I get about batteries from my dealer is to use what Porsche recommends regarding besides voltage (natch) CCA, AH, etc. My dealer supplies Interstate batteries.

The wheel sizes and offsets offered by the factory have been tested and the car's alignment adjustment able to bring the alignment into spec. If you venture to using other tire/wheel sizes and offsets like with tracking you are on your own.

Brakes require extensive testing since they are a safety critical item. No way Porsche can test any aftermarket brake setup.

And the rest of the items are just nonsense, owners thinking that by slapping a large this, a louder that, that they can arrive at a better package than the factory.

Porsche is right to to disapprove of all the items you listed. In some way it is trying to protect you against yourself.

The SA is right. The newer cars are quite complicated to work on and are beyond the home mechanic's ability, and tool/equipment setup.

But of course as long as the car can be picked up off the ground without breaking in two, and some bit of "work" done with no immediate harm everyone thinks he's a Porsche mechanic.
 
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