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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This time I tried Acer out of LA after my first set from Tikore.

Can't really tell a difference between the two other than price! Can't complain over $188 shipped for a full set which I will use for our winter wheel set.

Picture shows OEM after 2 winters and the Acer bolts.


:dance:

Later,
Andy
 

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Sorry, but I've gotta ask. Why do you need two sets of bolts - only one car???!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, not sure how to answer your question... Why do I have a Porsche in the first place? Why do I buy my wife diamonds? Why do I mod my others cars?
i guess I like nice things and these little details give me joy.
I have a set of OEM wheel bolts for free to give away, anybody?
 

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You missed the point and got all defensive. Its your money - buy all the stuff you want. I'm trying to understand if there is a problem with the first set of Ti bolts that made you spring for another nearly identical set. I thought these were durable and would be usable for all seasons for many years. Since your new set is indistinguishable from the more expensive ones, I thought you may have had some logical reason. I'll buy two identical pairs of athletic shoes, but those are wear items. Does your wife buy two identical designer dresses?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think you got that wrong, not defensive at all! I have a summer wheel set with Tikore bolts (which are longer since I use spacers) and they are just great, no rust, no issues at all, love them! For the winter wheels I use the OEM bolts and they slowly show some wear and rust.
Peace!
 

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There's no way in hell I'd ever use aftermarket Ti bolts on any car; they're proven to have weaker threads than steel ones, and with the whopping 118 ft/lbs required by Porsche, not worth the risk IMO, especially if tracking, or aggressive driving. Many instances of folks crashing after losing a wheel in a curve. Besides, you can hardly see them, and the few grams of weight savings (and close to the center, where it hardly matters) are hardly worth 'upgrading' even if they were as strong as stock. But that's just me;).
 

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Ah, it never rains in California, lol. OEM bolts work just fine here and last the life of the car. Yea, I'm bragging. It helps when it comes time to pay my State Taxes. lol
 

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Ah, it never rains in California, lol. OEM bolts work just fine here and last the life of the car. Yea, I'm bragging. It helps when it comes time to pay my State Taxes. lol
I really don't want to hear that! Mind you, from watching the TV news it seems as though the sun been shining a bit too much this year.

Best wishes from rainy England (though the sun is shining at the moment)
 

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I did read somewhere that the OEM steel bolts have an approximate 20 tightening lifespan due to stretching. I replaced them in my 968 once and will replace them soon in my 2104 Cayenne (same size tires F/R lets me rotate them, necessitating more wheel removals). I will buy the metal ones from Porsche - just the cost of car ownership monkey-business I guess.
 

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Ah, it never rains in California, lol. OEM bolts work just fine here and last the life of the car. Yea, I'm bragging. It helps when it comes time to pay my State Taxes. lol
No, but there's a real possibility of your bolts (and car) melting due to the Dante's Inferno wildfires.
 

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There's no way in hell I'd ever use aftermarket Ti bolts on any car; they're proven to have weaker threads than steel ones, and with the whopping 118 ft/lbs required by Porsche, not worth the risk IMO, especially if tracking, or aggressive driving. Many instances of folks crashing after losing a wheel in a curve. Besides, you can hardly see them, and the few grams of weight savings (and close to the center, where it hardly matters) are hardly worth 'upgrading' even if they were as strong as stock. But that's just me;).
Proven? I would like to read more on this, since you have some information can you share?
 

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Proven? I would like to read more on this, since you have some information can you share?
Don't be lazy and google it, if interested;). The first misconception is that Ti is stronger than steel. It is and it isn't, and in the case of lug bolts, it isn't. Ti is stronger than steel by WEIGHT, but not by volume. So a lighter Ti lug bolt won't be stronger than steel. In addition, pure grade Ti is too brittle for automotive use, and fails catastrophically (my initial comment). Therefore, any lug bolt worth a darn nowadays, will be made of a Ti/Aluminum/Vanadium alloy (3/2, 6/4, etc), each with its own pros and cons. Then there's the Ti quality too. Like with every product, there's a lot to be learned by doing your research. I'd advice those wanting to replace their stock lug bolts to do their homework first, and find out exactly what they're buying, and understand the compromises;). Something as stupid as lug bolts can be the difference between having fun and being your last drive. Hope this helps.
 

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Don't be lazy and google it, if interested;). The first misconception is that Ti is stronger than steel. It is and it isn't, and in the case of lug bolts, it isn't. Ti is stronger than steel by WEIGHT, but not by volume. So a lighter Ti lug bolt won't be stronger than steel. In addition, pure grade Ti is too brittle for automotive use, and fails catastrophically (my initial comment). Therefore, any lug bolt worth a darn nowadays, will be made of a Ti/Aluminum/Vanadium alloy (3/2, 6/4, etc), each with its own pros and cons. Then there's the Ti quality too. Like with every product, there's a lot to be learned by doing your research. I'd advice those wanting to replace their stock lug bolts to do their homework first, and find out exactly what they're buying, and understand the compromises;). Something as stupid as lug bolts can be the difference between having fun and being your last drive. Hope this helps.
ELP_JC; Thanks for the reply and by the way it has nothing to do with being lazy, you made a comment and I want to know why you made the comment, people make these comments all the time here without any substance behind them, I wonder if they know what they're talking about. How you reach your conclusions are as important as the conclusion themselves.

The other day on this forum, I had a guy argue me how hill-hold worked on the 981 and even warned about it's short comings, it took a bit of banter but I eventually found out he had an older Porsche that didn't even have this feature and that he was describing how it worked on a BMW he had, assuming that it worked exactly the same on both the BMW and the 981! Not only was he was wrong but he was also spreading dissinformation to boot... :crazy:

Thanks again for the details
 
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I understand. Aftermarket stuff can be tricky, so not as clear-cut as a car feature. But when it comes to mechanical 'upgrades', especially something that can affect my safety, I don't even look at them unless it's something I really need, which is rarely the case, since I buy my vehicles the way I like to drive, to precisely avoid messing with them. But if that's the case, I get deep into it to make sure it's at least as safe/strong as stock. In this case, saving a few grams on lug bolts near the center of rotation makes zero difference, so I wouldn't replace them even if the most expensive ones (about $800) were given to me for free... but that's just me:). But for some folks, function comes before form, and I respect that. But I suspect if those folks knew such replacements could be worse than stock (same with racing air filters, for instance), they'd think twice before buying such mods. Or at least make an educated purchase. Have a great afternoon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This thread took some weird turns...

What really worries me is that there are supposedly accidents/wheels falling off using titanium hardware? Never heard of it. I did a lot of research on this and yes, a lot of people think it is not worth it and that is perfectly understandable. However, to my best knowledge Porsche, Ferrari and other car manufacturers are using or have been using titanium bolts?
Any insight or further information on this?
 

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This thread took some weird turns...

What really worries me is that there are supposedly accidents/wheels falling off using titanium hardware? Never heard of it. I did a lot of research on this and yes, a lot of people think it is not worth it and that is perfectly understandable. However, to my best knowledge Porsche, Ferrari and other car manufacturers are using or have been using titanium bolts?
Any insight or further information on this?

WTH is wrong with you man? Did you forget this was a Porsche you are messing with. You are surely going to die, or at the very minimum your Porsche will turn into a pumpkin at midnight if you use non-OEM parts. Emoticon Yellow Smiley Smile Line
 

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This thread took some weird turns...

What really worries me is that there are supposedly accidents/wheels falling off using titanium hardware? Never heard of it. I did a lot of research on this and yes, a lot of people think it is not worth it and that is perfectly understandable. However, to my best knowledge Porsche, Ferrari and other car manufacturers are using or have been using titanium bolts?
Any insight or further information on this?
That is why I asked for supporting evidence, I didn't come across it either when researching titanium wheel bolts, for those that claim the titainium wheel bolts can present a problem all I ask is that rather then simply making the statement that there is a problem, how hard is it to go 1 step further and support your claim?

I have noticed that this happens a lot on the net, people pipe up with contrary views and many times they never support them with any real or verifiable data... sure everybody is entitled to an opinion, but it should be stated as such rather then portrayed as a fact.
 
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