Planet-9 Porsche Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Borlafide member of Northeast Group
Joined
·
789 Posts
you mean PSM....there is a switch on the lower right of the console just below your climate control system. Just press the button...yellow light will mean it's off and you'll have a warning light on your dash.
 

·
Crusin worlds most isolated city
Joined
·
3,755 Posts
Press the "PSM" button.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
377 Posts
FYI be careful turning off the PSM. This will disable not only the traction control but the Porsche Stability Management system. Look this up or check if it is covered in the manual. This system prevents unwanted spinning of the car by decreasing throttle or applying individual brakes. If you are up to this, then OK.
 

·
Sexual Philanthropist
Joined
·
1,001 Posts
^^ What he said. I think there's actually a law that states if you can't figure out how to turn off psm, you are not allowed to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
FWIW I leave mine on. That said, I haven't tried my CS in the snow yet, but my VW with ESP (a similar system) had an option to turn it off too.

It turns out this was a good thing as there were times the car was stuck trying to get started in the snow/ice. Turning it off was the only way to break free. I needed the wheels to spin, slip some, to get some momentum going. Once I get some momentum, being very controlled with the throttle and clutch not to spin, I'd turn the ESP back on as it did help to stop the car in a straight line on very icy roads. There is just no way a human can individually brake the wheels. The stability systems are useful, but ice/snow seemed to confuse my VW at times.

Perhaps the Porsche system does better in snow/ice at low speeds.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,730 Posts
hi i have cayman s 2006 i dont know how to turn off the traction control
I turn off PSM every time I turn on my car and before driving off, BUT... you better be sure you want to do so!!! True it stays obedient and not as wild as a BMW but if you push its limit you'll have so much fun as long as you're in control (KNOWING HOW TO CONTROL THIS BEAST) otherwise, DON'T turn off the PSM... just DON'T !!

And for sure never turn it off in the rain... I don't in this case except on U-Turns just for fun ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
And for sure never turn it off in the rain...
+1. I once remember the PSM intervening after the rear end started to throw a big wobbly as I was pushing out of a roundabout (in very wet conditions)...it could have been hugely embarassing but instead made me look like a hero...:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
^^ What he said. I think there's actually a law that states if you can't figure out how to turn off psm, you are not allowed to.
:) Many truths are said in jest.

Perhaps the feline beauty of the Cayman, can be deceptive and at times we may mistake it for a house cat. Dosen't, PSM, stand for chair and whip?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts
FYI regarding off mode with PSM. If you were to lock up the front two wheels in an attempt to suddenly stop, then PSM automatically kicks back in to try to save yo #$$... I wouldn't recommend testing it though. :burnout:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
In addition to the above, PSM kicks in even when it is switched off if one of the front wheels enters the ABS threshold. If the car is equipped with SC and you have this on then both wheels need to enter this threshold before it will intervene. Either way, you can never truly switch it off...
 
  • Like
Reactions: matsadat

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,792 Posts
^^ What he said. I think there's actually a law that states if you can't figure out how to turn off psm, you are not allowed to.
I second that. PSM will save you from many mistakes. Including lift off oversteer, ask me how I know?!

PSM: Please Save Me
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,730 Posts
I second that. PSM will save you from many mistakes. Including lift off oversteer, ask me how I know?!

PSM: Please Save Me
I agree 100%

Try it first in an isolated street/area just for the fun of it... if you are not comfortable/confident with donuts, oversteering and happy-tails then NEVER do it...

BE WARNED

It is addictive ;)

Even my Land Cruiser enjoys flirting with his happy tail too :dance:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
I used to have a rule when I would get a rental car on location (I travel a lot): always do a panic stop from 60MPH. I'd do this so I would know how the car would react in a panic situation. It effectively calibrated my stopping distances and expectations for what the car would do. I think the same holds true for stability control.

If you have no aspirations of learning how to truly drive your car, leave it on - always. If you want to actually learn how your car reacts and how to become a better driver, find a huge wide open space with no solid objects and turn your traction control off and intentionally induce to slide, spin. I personally believe it has the same effect as what I described with doing a panic stop. Me personally, I like that it's there for when I initially learn a car, but after that, I'd prefer it had a full and complete "really off" button. :)

But to answer your original question, if you can't either find it in the manual or on the center console, you're probably better off not ever touching it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
806 Posts
... If you want to actually learn how your car reacts and how to become a better driver, find a huge wide open space with no solid objects and turn your traction control off and intentionally induce to slide, spin....
Or go to an autocross. Autocrosses are excellent places to learn how your car reacts. Courses are designed with safety in mind, e.g. likely spin-outs will lead you into open space, rather than a wall or light post. You can also get instruction at an autocross. Check if you local PCA offers some sort of performance driving school. They are typically excellent.

The ONLY time I turn PSM off is if the consequences of a mistake or spin-out or oversteer are ZERO, like at an autocross. On the street, well, the consequences of a spin-out or oversteer are significantly greater than zero, therefore PSM stays on. On a high-speed track (DE or otherwise), the consequences are significantly greater than zero, so PSM stays on. You get the idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
+1 on autox. Great place to cut your teeth and improve your driving skills. I autox'd for several years and really enjoyed it.

As far as never turning PSM off on the track, there seem to be different schools of thought. Some take the conservative approach and say never turn it off. I'm of the different camp that prefers a car that does not try to manage my driving. While i'm no pro driver by any stretch, I feel fairly comfortable managing a car without electronic nannies. I've tried to induce spin in the CS on the track and while it does come around more quickly than some cars, it's not the "OMG it spins like a top!" experience that some have described. To each their own. Only do what makes you comfortable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Well, FWIW long before PSM existed many of us drove rear wheel drive cars.

My 914 never spun on me, ever, but I've been in cars that have... it happens fast ;)
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top