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I've thought about buying a cayman for a while, specifically a cayman S (987). Any known issues to look out for? Is it a good idea to get a bore scoring inspection done before buying a car? What kind of prices should I expect to pay for a 987 cayman s? Do you think the 987 may be a future classic? I drove a 2007 cayman S a few days ago and I really liked it! I hope to test drive more.


I currently live in Las vegas. I have been searching there and in California. I am trying to buy one with less than 70,000 miles on it. Preferably under 50,000 miles. Is the 987.2 better than the 987.1?

I have so many questions! Any useful advice and/or leads on where to buy one would be very appreciated!
The 987.2 is going to be the best option if you can find one in my opinion. even the base 987.2 is a fun car as it’s a HP mic between the 987.1 base and S model at 265bhp. with the 987.2 base or S you get the ease of mind that the Ims will never be an issue, I personally have the PDK in a 2009 base and love it , but i can understand your want for a manual.

the newest car you can afford is always the best option when looking at a porsche, but whatever you get , get a PPI and you will be happy with whatever you choose!
 

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I have a Carrara White 2007 S, gray interior. (Cooler in summer) with only 29,839 miles on it. For Sale. Never been tracked, no hits, no fouls. Clean. Just a few tasteful touch-ups to the car: LN Bilt Deep baffled oil pan. Fabspeed headers. Guard LSD. Tarret front and rear suspension- bars, end links, etc. GT3 intake, and much more done at Auto Technik in Phoenix, a Porsche race shop. Oh, and I did the IMS with a direct oil feed (DOF) replacement. Two sets of tires and wheels. Original and OZ. Over 18-K in these upgrades. I have the documentation, of course. It's the car posted as my Avatar here on Planet 9. $34-K takes it.
 

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I have a 2007 Cayman S 987.1 manual that I'm about to sell. I bought it as a CPO with 30k miles back in 2010 and now it has 93k miles. I'll probably be seeking $20k or so due to the mods it has. Honestly, these cars are pretty bullet proof. The only thing replaced under CPO was the water pump, and they only did it as a precaution as it was coming up on its life expectancy. I replaced the AOS as a precaution because it was cheap and I had to remove/install it anyways to paint my manifolds. My headliner also started drooping, so that was replaced with Alcantara for $350. That's it other than clutch, and normal items like brakes. If I don't get a decent price, I'll probably just keep the car and track it. It's that reliable. I don't know if you saw the consumer reports recently, but Porsche was named the most reliable brand.
 

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What's your price range - the single most important factor in what you get? I have a 987.1 3.8 for sale and also a 987.2 turbo.
 

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As a current owner of a 987.1 Cayman I'll share my thoughts as my car is currently at Flat 6 Innovations for a new engine build after suffering severe bore score at 85K mi. As some else said, don't worry about the IMS on a US M97. Not an issue. I love my car so I am putting more money into it than its worth. This will be my last sports car.

Biggest issue is bore score and this is starting to show up as an issue with high mileage 9A1 987.2 and 997.1 cars as well. Beware it is possible for early bore score to show up below the pistons which will not be caught by a borescope through the spark plug holes. And it is very tricky to do it the right way with the oil pan removed through the lower engine case. Ask me how I know. A telltale give away of bore score is a ticking sound from the engine bay that many mistake for a sticky or loose valve lifter. That sound is most often a sign of bore scoring. You conduct a stethoscope survey from under the car to locate the source of the ticking ( which cylinder) and then follow-up with borescope of any suspect cylinders, preferably through the lower case.

Other things to check with that kind of mileage;

  • Clutch and Flywheel replacement - if it hasn't been done you will need to. Total parts and labor will vary, plan on $2500-$3200 to have someone else to do it.
  • AOS - I consider this a maintenance item. If it hasn't been replaced yet, I would plan on it. Part alone is around $100. Not a bad job if you can do basic wrenching.
  • New Water pump and low-temperature thermostat - the water pump generally starts to fail on these cars every 30-50k mi it seems. Some may last longer. Look for low fluid and leaks under area of water pump. Also, listen for what may sound like a pully squeak. The leak is a give away.
  • Check coolant expansion tank for cracks or leaks. At this age and mileage, many will start to fail. These cost about $350 and are PIA to put in without dropping the engine.
  • Engine mounts - generally the front ones are cracked at this point and the rear mounts at the transmission should be inspected. Mine was cracked and it wasn't really noticeable in daily driving. It became more apparent while autocrossing.
  • Check the coil packs for cracking. The original ones had a design flaw and most cars will see these crack over time especially at this age and higher miles.
  • DME analysis - As someone else has already pointed out, have the over revs checked for anything level 3 and above where it matters most.
  • DME analysis - check ready state of emissions system analysis and make sure there are no error codes particularly related to O2 sensors or catalysts. The front converters are part of the header and very expensive to replace with OEM or a quality aftermarket replacement. OEM is about $2300 each side, Soul Peformance is about that or a little more for 200 cell set, Maganflow set can be had for $700-$800.
  • DME analysis - check the voltage resistance on MAF sensor with the engine off. If it is at 1v or above MAF is about to or is in fail mode.
If everything checks out on a PPI than I would plan on the following to proactively improve the longevity and reliability of your car;

  • If the catback muffler/exhaust has not been replaced either do a Cantrell Carnewald conversion to remove the second set of cats in the mufflers or find an aftermarket version that you like. It will free up exhaust flow making you and your engine happier.
  • On 987.1 it is a good idea to replace the stock oil pan baffle at a minimum a unit like the EBS racing baffle which is all metal and helps keep oil pooled in the pan better during high g loads when cornering. Get an extended pan and baffle kit from someone like LN Engineering if you want additional help with oil temps and foaming/oil level management during more spirited driving.
  • Unless recent service records cover any of the following I always replace plugs, transaxle fluids, flush the brake fluid, and change oil and filter when I get a new used vehicle. Use an oil like DT40 which has a better wear package than anything Mobile 1 offers and will help the engine go longer before it needs a rebuild. I change oil every 5000 mi. or 6 months, whichever comes first.
  • Head off more costly issues of bore score and catalytic converter failure by replacing all the fuel injectors. It's cheaper than just sending out the old ones and will perform better. New injectors will also have some design improvements over the original units.
Hopefully like many of us you enjoy tinkering and wrenching on your car to keep it up to snuff. For me that is part of the experience of owning an older sports car.

Good luck with your purchase decision and let us know what you end up getting!
 

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Great points to consider - thanks for the in-depth post.

I also have a 2007 'S' (with high mileage). Can you provide the brand name(s) of the upgraded components you mentioned?

*injectors
*coil packs

TIA
 

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Wow, lots of cars for sale in this thread. Mine's headed that direction too, after picking up a 991.2.

I think the best advice is to look for cars that have stayed on top of the maintenance issues. I know in the last few years I've replaced my water pump, spark plugs, accessory belt/pulleys, headliner, hood/trunk lifts, clutch/flywheel/pp, front LCAs (worn bushings), brake pads/rotors, etc.
 

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Biggest issue is bore score and this is starting to show up as an issue with high mileage 9A1 987.2 and 997.1 cars as well.
The only one that I recall was scoring on a 997.2 4S engine at over 70k miles shown by Jake Raby, do you know of any more stories, for example in 3.4 liter in 987.2S?
 

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We may need Jake to address the two engines pitfalls and strengths. Also, which oil formulation works best in each engine to due to the injection systems and piston clearance. Maybe he already addressed this in one of his videos.

I went back last night and reviewed many of the important video's in the Jake Raby series on bore scoring. Each motor class has its own issues as we are seeing playing out. Lake Speed at LN has some unique thoughts on which oil to use in each of these motors. Please take an evening and review these important, free documents that can help guide our decision making process going forward. The bore scoring knowledge is available to each of us to solve our problems or better, avoid the pitfalls of our cars expensive engine.

Jake Raby's video #5 on bore scoring help us understand how to prevent the scoring form happening. I find this video refreshing as it give me a roadmap to engine longevity and peace of mind.
 

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Absolutely agree Apex, it would be interesting to hear him directly compare the both engines with his experience, oil use to both would be interesting too. Also, would he purchase a M9X engine versus 9A1 considering similar price and how much car value it gets you and possible troubles.
 

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The 3,2 litre engine found in 2005-2006 doesn't suffer from bore scoring cause that engine doesn't have the forged pistons. BUT that shouldn't scare anyone of buying a nice 3,4 unit.
 

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Great points to consider - thanks for the in-depth post.

I also have a 2007 'S' (with high mileage). Can you provide the brand name(s) of the upgraded components you mentioned?

*injectors
*coil packs

TIA
I purchased OEM Bosch injector set and OEM Beru coil pack set from ECS Tuning. Others carry these as well. Double-check each of these is to the latest design updates as Porsche OEM. Most products in the pipeline out there should be at this point but it never hurts to confirm.
 

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We may need Jake to address the two engines pitfalls and strengths. Also, which oil formulation works best in each engine to due to the injection systems and piston clearance. Maybe he already addressed this in one of his videos.

I went back last night and reviewed many of the important video's in the Jake Raby series on bore scoring. Each motor class has its own issues as we are seeing playing out. Lake Speed at LN has some unique thoughts on which oil to use in each of these motors. Please take an evening and review these important, free documents that can help guide our decision making process going forward. The bore scoring knowledge is available to each of us to solve our problems or better, avoid the pitfalls of our cars expensive engine.

Jake Raby's video #5 on bore scoring help us understand how to prevent the scoring form happening. I find this video refreshing as it give me a roadmap to engine longevity and peace of mind.
Jake's videos are very informative and helpful. That's how I knew how to proceed in diagnosing my car myself and saved about $500-$700 in service charges to have someone else do it, potentially the wrong way. He recommends DT40 (as does Lake and LN Engineering) for general daily driving with 5000/6 mo changer intervals, whichever comes first.

But if you track your car or aggressively autocross he recommends several options for "racing oil" (Motul or Driven) for events that can be changed out and saved for next event depending on runtime/mi/laps at an event. He also has me running a new semi-synthetic blend in my car as secondary break-in oil (GP-1) that he feels may be a good option with similar service intervals as the DT40 after break-in due to it's unique PA crude composition based on the old Kendall GT-1 I believe. Jake, Lake and Chuck at LN all work together and deploy a shared knowledge base that should net you similar recommendations from any of them.
 

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I believe this is what oil your 9A1 engine needs, Check out the LN web site, Driven is listed there and has specifics for this oil.

Driven's DI Synthetic Engine Oil is designed specifically for Direct Fuel Injection Engines. The DI oil delivers cutting-edge lubricant technology specifically developed for direct injection engines. The DI oil utilizes an advanced additive package designed to reduce abnormal combustion, such as low speed pre-ignition issues, and protects against soot related wear. A lower volatility base oil also reduces crankcase vapors and carbon buildup on intake valves. All in a formula that will not harm your catalytic converter or gasoline particulate filters.**

Non-direct injected engines can use Driven DT40 where a 5w40 is preferred as an alternate to an A40-approved oil. Please note Driven oils do not have Porsche approval as their formulation chemistry would not allow them to carry either the A40 or C40 approval.


269315
 

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Thanks Apex. I sent them an email with some questions, it looks like a very purposeful product.
 

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I believe this is what oil your 9A1 engine needs, Check out the LN web site, Driven is listed there and has specifics for this oil.

Driven's DI Synthetic Engine Oil is designed specifically for Direct Fuel Injection Engines. The DI oil delivers cutting-edge lubricant technology specifically developed for direct injection engines. The DI oil utilizes an advanced additive package designed to reduce abnormal combustion, such as low speed pre-ignition issues, and protects against soot related wear. A lower volatility base oil also reduces crankcase vapors and carbon buildup on intake valves. All in a formula that will not harm your catalytic converter or gasoline particulate filters.**

Non-direct injected engines can use Driven DT40 where a 5w40 is preferred as an alternate to an A40-approved oil. Please note Driven oils do not have Porsche approval as their formulation chemistry would not allow them to carry either the A40 or C40 approval.


View attachment 269315
That’s the stuff. Definitely give LN a call they can tell you about the wear package in these oils which is what sets them apart from Porsche approved oils.
 
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