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29s/14s F&R is THE hot ticket, provides correct F&R bias that stock lack - got em in stock, ***P9 pricing applies***
 

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As others have said, stock rotors (or stock size slotted rotors when the stockers give up) should be fine. For what you describe, Pagid yellows are a pretty good pad choice: long wear, easy on rotors. My only significant complaint about them is that (for me) I like more bite and less pedal pressure, but this is individual preference and you said that initial bite is not a priority for you. Good, fresh fluid is essential.

If you get fast enough and push hard enough, eventually you will probably wish for more brake than the stock setup can handle (larger brakes/calipers and lots of $$, essentially to increase heat capacity). Most people never reach this point so I would not worry about it for now. It depends a lot on how far down the competitive road you go, how much grip your tires generate, and your individual driving style.

Mostly get out there and have a blast!
 

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what do you do correct stock balance issue?
stronger pads than rear?
or vise versa?
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
front and rear ducts do help a lot.
Doing the GT3 ducts is that what you mean? What about rear, have not seen much on what folks are doing with those?
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
As others have said, stock rotors (or stock size slotted rotors when the stockers give up) should be fine. For what you describe, Pagid yellows are a pretty good pad choice: long wear, easy on rotors. My only significant complaint about them is that (for me) I like more bite and less pedal pressure, but this is individual preference and you said that initial bite is not a priority for you. Good, fresh fluid is essential.

If you get fast enough and push hard enough, eventually you will probably wish for more brake than the stock setup can handle (larger brakes/calipers and lots of $$, essentially to increase heat capacity). Most people never reach this point so I would not worry about it for now. It depends a lot on how far down the competitive road you go, how much grip your tires generate, and your individual driving style.

Mostly get out there and have a blast!

I am going with stock rotors, then Sebro, RS29 all around. Also looked at our brake setup, radial mount etc. Fairly easy to do a larger rotor with stock calipers. Going to eventually look into this. Depending on what OEM Rotors are available with 28MM and correct offset there may be a cheap solution. I just don't know if OEM rotors from other P cars have correct offset. I know one P car has a 330 by 28 but don't know offset, if it were correct this would be a no brainer.
 

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Doing the GT3 ducts is that what you mean? What about rear, have not seen much on what folks are doing with those?
GT3 ducts in front. Cheap and effective. Olsen Motorsports ones ($700 IIRC) are supposed to be very good.

Rears: 997 or 996 TT ducts (or both). Search for threads (including mine) on here.
 

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GT3 ducts in front. Cheap and effective. Olsen Motorsports ones ($700 IIRC) are supposed to be very good.

Rears: 997 or 996 TT ducts (or both). Search for threads (including mine) on here.
Do you run w/ Shattenbaum and TT4C? I just recognized your car via your avatar and realized we probably have been at a number of events together.

I ran rs29's, stock rotors, lines, fliuid the above mentioned ducts, and the gt3 master cylinder (made a huge difference for pedal feel.) Super predictable and zero fade on extended sessions. I run in the advanced group of a number of orgs and race formula cars as well.

Unless you are racing this setup is more than enough, and as someone else mentioned earlier in the thread even then its probably still enough. Heck the PCA I/H/J class caymans have to run stock size rotors & master cylinders with only lines/pads/fluid available for replacement and they stop just fine under race conditions.
 

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I do run with Schattenbaum but not very often - just a function of which events I could fit into my schedule past couple of years. You're probably thinking of another white Spyder that's at NJMP very often, frequently with Schattenbaum. :)
 

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I do run with Schattenbaum but not very often - just a function of which events I could fit into my schedule past couple of years. You're probably thinking of another white Spyder that's at NJMP very often, frequently with Schattenbaum. :)

You all look the same to me :).

I hear you - hence I run with about 5 different clubs.
 

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GT3 ducts in front. Cheap and effective. Olsen Motorsports ones ($700 IIRC) are supposed to be very good.

Rears: 997 or 996 TT ducts (or both). Search for threads (including mine) on here.
+1 Had my shop install the 997 Turbo rear brake ducts on my rear (they needed a little massaging to get on and stay on. :hilarious:
 

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For a racing application I have 2 piece stop tech 355 mm front rotors and stock sebro slotted rears. i have ducted cooling to front and the rear. Also SS brake lines with 600 fluid. I am running the CL endurance pads. At this point I am not getting out-braked by anyone, have good pad and rotor life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Do you run w/ Shattenbaum and TT4C? I just recognized your car via your avatar and realized we probably have been at a number of events together.

I ran rs29's, stock rotors, lines, fliuid the above mentioned ducts, and the gt3 master cylinder (made a huge difference for pedal feel.) Super predictable and zero fade on extended sessions. I run in the advanced group of a number of orgs and race formula cars as well.

Unless you are racing this setup is more than enough, and as someone else mentioned earlier in the thread even then its probably still enough. Heck the PCA I/H/J class caymans have to run stock size rotors & master cylinders with only lines/pads/fluid available for replacement and they stop just fine under race conditions.
One of the reasons I seek advice from those that know from experience... :p
 

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For a racing application I have 2 piece stop tech 355 mm front rotors and stock sebro slotted rears. i have ducted cooling to front and the rear. Also SS brake lines with 600 fluid. I am running the CL endurance pads. At this point I am not getting out-braked by anyone, have good pad and rotor life.
How do you like the Stop Techs with stock rears? Notice a difference in balance? Which calipers did you install?

I'm getting ready to upgrade and like the Stop Tech setup; would like to hear feedback from people who have gone big in front only versus all around.

Cheers,
Walter
 

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The balance has not changed and is still great with the 6 piston front stop techs. I may change the stock rears out but not right away. As I said braking is very very good at this point.
 

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I would say the #1 thing to address on any braking system is COOLING! If you are braking hard on track from my experience, you need to add cooling. Olsen Motorsports and a few others make a ducting kit for the fronts that made all the difference for me. I'm racing so I'm always looking for the last tenth of a second, but I think a slotted rotor setup and stock calipers should be fine for your application with proper (and lots) of cooling. I started out with the GiroDiscs, then moved to the PFC rotors. Finally, I moved to the Brembo racing BBK up front and stock setup with PFC rotors in back. I also run Teves ABS on my car. For my money and your application, Quality cooling ducts like Olsen Motorsports and the PFC rotors and pads would give you lots of life and good service. I don't find the 08 compound grabby, but the more aggressive compounds in the PFC stable likely would not suit your described tastes. Feel free to PM if you want more info. Good luck!
 

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I have GT3 front brakes, PCCB master cylinder, SS lines, GT3 front ducts. In rear I have Sebro slotted. In front I have run combinations of stock drilled, solid Cayenne, and Deman slotted rotors; OEM Pagid, Hawk, and PFC08 pads w/ SRF and PF fluid. As far as braking performance I didn't notice much difference. I got fade after a few laps w/ all of them. Trying to teach myself to brake less. :) The stock drilled rotors were banned by PCA tech guys because of cracks getting too close to each other and the outside long before they would be replaced on the st.
 

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I would say the #1 thing to address on any braking system is COOLING! If you are braking hard on track from my experience, you need to add cooling. Olsen Motorsports and a few others make a ducting kit for the fronts that made all the difference for me. I'm racing so I'm always looking for the last tenth of a second, but I think a slotted rotor setup and stock calipers should be fine for your application with proper (and lots) of cooling. I started out with the GiroDiscs, then moved to the PFC rotors. Finally, I moved to the Brembo racing BBK up front and stock setup with PFC rotors in back. I also run Teves ABS on my car. For my money and your application, Quality cooling ducts like Olsen Motorsports and the PFC rotors and pads would give you lots of life and good service. I don't find the 08 compound grabby, but the more aggressive compounds in the PFC stable likely would not suit your described tastes. Feel free to PM if you want more info. Good luck!
More specifically, the thing to address is heat capacity and rejection. Brakes are very simple: they turn energy in the form of motion into energy in the form of heat. The more of this heat you can absorb, and the faster you can reject it, the more braking you can perform without overheating the brakes or fluid.

Cooling with added air flow is great and will help, but the reality is this will not increase heat capacity and rejection nearly as much as larger brakes. It's just physics, and unfortunately expensive physics. Calipers that are 50% bigger can absorb 50% more heat before they reach the same temperature as the smaller calipers. Larger rotors also will increase in temperature less than stock rotors for the same about of braking. And in both cases, the larger area also means they reject heat to the air around them faster. So they can both absorb more heat without overheating, and can get rid of it faster.

:cheers:
 

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this is true, however there is no point to increase heat capacity more than required.
otherwise you'll end with huge and heavy rotors and calipers.
where the exact points that you decide that increase in heat capacity is required and when it's sufficient - it's different for every type of car and its specific application.
but IMO before heat capacity increase the cooling should be done first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I would say the #1 thing to address on any braking system is COOLING! If you are braking hard on track from my experience, you need to add cooling. Olsen Motorsports and a few others make a ducting kit for the fronts that made all the difference for me. I'm racing so I'm always looking for the last tenth of a second, but I think a slotted rotor setup and stock calipers should be fine for your application with proper (and lots) of cooling. I started out with the GiroDiscs, then moved to the PFC rotors. Finally, I moved to the Brembo racing BBK up front and stock setup with PFC rotors in back. I also run Teves ABS on my car. For my money and your application, Quality cooling ducts like Olsen Motorsports and the PFC rotors and pads would give you lots of life and good service. I don't find the 08 compound grabby, but the more aggressive compounds in the PFC stable likely would not suit your described tastes. Feel free to PM if you want more info. Good luck!

Curious why you are running Teves? Assume it is a Teves MK6 ? I read these are a popular retrofit on earlier P cars but why on this one? Is it performance or Ice pedal? Also of curiosity, do both 987.1 and .2 cars run same ABS units?
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
this is true, however there is no point to increase heat capacity more than required.
otherwise you'll end with huge and heavy rotors and calipers.
where the exact points that you decide that increase in heat capacity is required and when it's sufficient - it's different for every type of car and its specific application.
but IMO before heat capacity increase the cooling should be done first.
Agreed, in this particular case - size does matter but too big is not good as well :p
 
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