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Hi

I have a 2005 Boxster S and i am interested in replacing the IMS with a better bearing, the problem is I dont know what type of bearing I have, smaller or bigger, I read elsewhere that 2005 boxster S can have either small or big bearing, is there a way to determine without opening the engine cover? or what is the easiest way to find out?
 

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You can search IMS or IMS Fix and read through the threads - I have a 2005 Boxster S as well and have the newer bearing as well. :( From an applicable thread:

"My 2005 Boxster S had the newer type bearing evidenced by the 22mm IMS bolt. If you see this size bolt in your motor, you will not be able to retrofit the new kit without taking the motor apart. My build date was April 2005. I had the AASCO lightweight flywheel and new clutch installed without balancing, which maybe more critical as the LWFW does not offer harmonic dampening. Good luck!"

You can talk to the indy pcar shops in your area, maybe they'd know - how many miles on your car? Have you had oil analyzed? Is car making "noises"? You may NEED an IMS retrofit, but you also may not - I had low miles when I purchased in September, had oil changed and analyzed, had magnetic oil plug installed, and am sleeping OK at night. After 10 years, you gotta figure the IMS would've already lunched, why not wait until you need clutch replaced, that'll save you $$$ that you can put into a lightweight pulley, or a plenum/TB upgrade (or both) haha.

Jeff
 

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What is the build date? If it's 2004, chances are you have the older version that is replaceable. Build MO / YR is on the sticker in the driver's door jamb.
 

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Hi

I have a 2005 Boxster S and i am interested in replacing the IMS with a better bearing, the problem is I dont know what type of bearing I have, smaller or bigger, I read elsewhere that 2005 boxster S can have either small or big bearing, is there a way to determine without opening the engine cover? or what is the easiest way to find out?
I also have a Preowned 2005 Boxster S with 37,000 miles, and was paranoid about the IMS, plus I was experiencing a small oil leak as well.
My in service date was April 25, 2005, and I never found out the build date, but the original warranty began on 4/25/05. (How do I find it out the build date anyways?) Well I had the LN Engineering Retrofit installed, along with the leak, which turned out to be the RMS (rear main seal) installing the improved Cayenne RMS seal, and as long as the Transmission was done, I had the clutch replaced along with the dual mass flywheel.

As as it turned out, I had the smaller SINGLE row IMS bearing, which was in perfect shape.
i was told by the mechanic to keep revs above 2500 rpm at all times, and change oil every 5,000 miles.
I use Porsche approved Motul Excel 5W40 Synthetic, as recommended.

If I had to do it again, I would install the LN Solution, (instead of the retrofit) that eliminates the actual bearing completely using a bushing and provides direct oil feed. This is reminiscent of the 911SC that had to have the Carrera tensioners and direct oil feeds install solving their problems.

They also have the IMS PRO, that replaces the single row with a more beefed up DOUBLE ROW row ceramic hybrid bearing.

just a note, when I ran my VIN on the class action Porsche lawsuit webpage, it said my vehicle was not a class vehicle so maybe my IMS was excluded for a good reason, or maybe Porsches way to limit their payouts. Try running your VIN, being you also have an '05 S and check your results and post them.
 

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My understanding of 2005 Boxter and 997 is to remove transmission and ect... to determine.
That is the ultimate way to tell, but also the most expensive path.

You can scan the IMS lawsuit to see if your VIN is included. They only included the old style IMSs.

Or your build date may give you an idea. The new version was implemented sometime mid-yr, possibly in March 2005. Chances are good if you have a 2004 build date, you have the old version. Like Porsche987, if you have an Apr 2005 or later (May-Aug 05) build date, you probably have the new version. Jan-Mar 05 is a crap shoot as to which one you may have.
 

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That is the ultimate way to tell, but also the most expensive path.

You can scan the IMS lawsuit to see if your VIN is included. They only included the old style IMSs.

Or your build date may give you an idea. The new version was implemented sometime mid-yr, possibly in March 2005. Chances are good if you have a 2004 build date, you have the old version. Like Porsche987, if you have an Apr 2005 or later (May-Aug 05) build date, you probably have the new version. Jan-Mar 05 is a crap shoot as to which one you may have.
In my case I must have the new version, as you stated, but exactly what does that mean? I was still able to retrofit the bearing by the tranny removal only, with no engine dismantling. Does it mean that mine was an excluded VIN from the class, because it being a new type of bearing, and prone to less failure? because after all, it is still is a single row bearing. I am trying to determine what it actually means for my VIN to have been excluded from the class. Is it a good thing? Obviously my Porsche is not eligible to be in the lawsuit, but the question is WHY? Any idea?
 

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You can search IMS or IMS Fix and read through the threads - I have a 2005 Boxster S as well and have the newer bearing as well. :( From an applicable thread:

"My 2005 Boxster S had the newer type bearing evidenced by the 22mm IMS bolt. If you see this size bolt in your motor, you will not be able to retrofit the new kit without taking the motor apart. My build date was April 2005. I had the AASCO lightweight flywheel and new clutch installed without balancing, which maybe more critical as the LWFW does not offer harmonic dampening. Good luck!"

You can talk to the indy pcar shops in your area, maybe they'd know - how many miles on your car? Have you had oil analyzed? Is car making "noises"? You may NEED an IMS retrofit, but you also may not - I had low miles when I purchased in September, had oil changed and analyzed, had magnetic oil plug installed, and am sleeping OK at night. After 10 years, you gotta figure the IMS would've already lunched, why not wait until you need clutch replaced, that'll save you $$$ that you can put into a lightweight pulley, or a plenum/TB upgrade (or both) haha.

Jeff
That switchover from the old bearing to the new bearing is such a tight date time frame.
My build date is 3/2005 and I have the OLDER bearing validated by the fact that I was able to do the LN Engineering IMS Bearing Retrofit WITHOUT engine dismantling.
One month made all the difference it seems.
Both have the advantages depending on how one views it.
Older bearing engines can have the bearing replaced as a maintenance item every 4 years 50K miles as recommended by LN, however the old bearing has a 10% failure rate.
New bearing engines cannot have the bearing replaced since it requires the engine pulled from the car and dismantled, however the new bearings have a 1% failure rate.

What I find interesting is that although I have an older bearing design, my VIN number is excluded from the class regarding the class action lawsuit, whereas it should have been included.
The newer bearing design should be excluded from the class due to the much lower failure rate.

I would be curious. Did you check you VIN against the lawsuit included VIN using their lookup tool?
 

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I did check the VIN against the lawsuit and it is not included because my car is not from US,
Oh that makes sense. I would not worry too much either way regarding the lawsuit since the 10 year period of coverage would be expiring shortly anyways. Mine would have ended in Mar '05.
 
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