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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the process of replacing the engine on my 2007 Porsche Cayman 2.7L Base...

It seems as though I can source a 2009-12 (.2 or Generation 2, 320HP, 25 MORE) PORSCHE CAYMAN Engine 3.4L with Direct Fuel Injection for about the same price or even cheaper than the 3.4L Gen 1 295HP version. It is my understanding that with the new Gen 2 engine I wouldn't have to be concerned about the IMS bearing failing and/or bore scoring on cylinder #6? It is my understanding that the body style of the vehicle didn't change from 2005 to 2012, just the engine for these newer years and a few things like lights and interior. Is the engine approximately the same size and could it fit into the same engine bay? Would the DFI require the installation of additional fuel lines?

I would much rather do a swap with a newer engine if it is going to cost me the same (or less). Could I easily swap out the old "Bosch EFI ECU" with a Gen 2 version.

Is the above an easy drop, swap, plug & play? Or am I overly simplifying this? I know if there is more horsepower, maybe the manual clutch and transmission may have issues? Would the 2007 manual transmission fit on a 2012 engine?

Has anyone done the above modification? Thanks!
 

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Definitely not trivial. The bodyshape is much the same but the wiring and engine management are totally different. It's possible (everything is) but it certainly won't be cheap. Sorry to rain on your parade.

Out of curiosity, what happened to the old engine? The 987.1 2.7 is less prone to large failure than many of the other engines in the Porsche stable.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What wiring would have to be modified? Engine management...I am assuming Direct Fuel Injection would need a special fuel pump in the fuel tank...?

Wondering if the majority of the components are interchangeable. For instance the 987.1 clutch and transmission can fit into the 987.2 engine?

I think the previous owner didn't take good care of the oil. I recently bought the car, did an oil change and the filter was from 2015 (5 years old), brass/bronze shavings in the oil, engine knock...thinking bad journal bearing(s).
 

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What wiring would have to be modified? Engine management...I am assuming Direct Fuel Injection would need a special fuel pump in the fuel tank...?

Wondering if the majority of the components are interchangeable. For instance the 987.1 clutch and transmission can fit into the 987.2 engine?

I think the previous owner didn't take good care of the oil. I recently bought the car, did an oil change and the filter was from 2015 (5 years old), brass/bronze shavings in the oil, engine knock...thinking bad journal bearing(s).
Things like the clutch and transmission are easy to check - look up the PN's on some Porsche parts websites. If the numbers are the same they're interchangeable. What isn't easy is the fuel and ignition systems. The ECU from the new engine would have to be used, so that means the engine harness that goes with the new engine would have to be mated to the main harness of the car. Possible? Maybe. How are you at electronics? The fuel system on a DFI engine uses a high-pressure-fuel-pump. I don't know where that's located on the H6 engines - on Porsche's V8's, it's driven off the rear of the port side camshaft. I'd guess the exhaust also might be engine specific - so that would require mounting the exhaust from the donor car on your car.

A more probable swap might be with the 2009 2.9L engine. It was still port injection, so the fuel supply should be the same. I can't speak to the rest of the engine electronics - things like the Variocam parameters may be different which would require a custom tune on the old ECU to the spec's of the newer engine. I also don't know about the various sensors scattered all over the engine - what the compatibility of those are.

As others have noted - it can be done if you have cubic money to spend - but it's not an afternoon with some ramps and a floorjack sort of job.
 

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The fuel supply on the direct injection engines isn't that fancy, it uses a regular in-tank pump to feed a mechanical pump on the engine itself which makes the DI pressures.

If I were doing this, I'd start with a wrecked donor .2.
 
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