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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,
I am not new to Planet-9. I am not new to Porsche's. I currently own a 2007 Cayman S. My DD at this time is a 2010 Volvo XC60. A great car in many ways. But kinda boring. Considering that my Cayman is in winter storage 6 months of the year. I live in northern VT. I don't get too much time to enjoy the Porsche experience.

I am considering a change to a Cayenne to replace the Volvo. I do not have a big budget. Probably in the 10-13K range. From the looks of things I am looking at 2008-2009 and maybe 2010. With 90 to 140 k miles.
I know nothing about this car. I am looking for any and all advice on any subject the relates to the car and the purchase of one. Big issue is...........are they reliable? Or am i looking at a money pit. I will put about 6-8 k mile per year on the car.

Thanks to all in advance. looking forward to being educated.
 

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I have a 2009 Cayenne Gts with over 300,000 miles on it and have had very little problems with it. The only real issue I had with it has been with the air suspension which i finally got straightened out. I also had to replace all 3 fuel pumps. The carrier bearing on the driveshaft also had to be replaced. Other than that basically just normal maintenance. I have read that they had issues with the transfer cases but I personally have not ran into that.


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If you're considering a V8 Cayenne, I'd suggest limiting your search to 2009 and newer models. Earlier V8 engines have an issue with potential bore scoring, starting with 2003 through the 2008 models. If the bore goes the car is basically worthless since even a used engine will have you upside down on it. Porsche seems to have gotten a handle on the issue sometime in mid to late 2008, meaning the 2009 + models are fairly trouble free.

If you're going to take the car to a dealer for service and repairs - it can become a money pit. Just because the car was cheap doesn't mean you'll get any discount on repairs. Most people on a budget DIY or find a good independent mechanic.

As has been mentioned - the 955/957 models have some known issues. The V8 955 (2003-2006) has bore scoring, plastic coolant pipes and the driveshaft bearing carrier issues. The 957 (2008-2010, there was no 2007 Cayenne in the US) still has bore scoring and coolant pipes. The V6 models of these series have less issues with bore scoring and no coolant pipe issues. ALL of this series have the driveshaft issue, and it's not an "if" issue, it's a "when" issue. There are various fixes including a $10 fix (Google JimmiFix).

The 958 - high mileage V6 models might fall into your price range. Less issues in general than the 955/957, but there are some. The first year (2011) V8's had a vario-cam issue that could destroy the engine. Porsche was eventually pushed into issuing a recall on those cars, if it hasn't been fixed, it still is in effect and can be done at no cost to the owner. The overall issue on this series is the "transfer case" - a google will turn up threads on it. Porsche has extended the warranty on that specific part, but even that extended warranty may be expired on the earlier 958's now. They don't all fail, but enough do that it should be taken into account when purchasing one. It should cost less than $4k to replace the transfer-case. There are now places selling internal parts for it, and I've seen one or two advertising they rebuild them.

That's about it for major got'cha's. I'd suggest spending some time browsing the forums we have here for the model that you're considering. If there is a problem area - it's sure to have been covered in depth.

Good luck!

EDIT: An inexpensive German luxury vehicle may be the most expensive vehicle you can own.
 

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I have a 08 GTS and love the beast. They are right about could possibly be a money pit if you go to the dealership, but with all the info on these forums (this and reenlist) you should be able to take care of whatever you need. Mine has 160k on it and I did the plastic coolant pipe replacement, changed coils and plugs, do the oil changes, changed a wheel hub and CV assembly, alternator ($1400) and changed the funky battery wire in the bay to a single post. We do a lot with ours though and it’s the most capable/useful vehicle I’ve ever owned. Definitely beat on it a little when you test drive and make sure all the suspension buttons work and manual shift as well as auto shift smoothly through the gears. Attached are some pictures of ours so enjoy! You’ll love it.




 

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I ran a 2006 for about 250k miles. Transfer case is not an issue on first gen. Costs are mainly big heavy fast car costs. They eat tires, rotors and pads like candy, and the huge oil sump adds up at oil change time. If cost is a priority beware of turbos, lots of extra labor to replace typical high mile items like water pumps and alternators. If you have to go to the dealer, it’ll be painful. I did the coolant pipes, fuel pumps, cardan shaft and an alternator. Otherwise no problems. My understanding of the bore scoring is that is related to a combination of cold temps and too close tolerances in the pistons, probably compounded by coil failures. I had no issues.


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Discussion Starter #6
Many thanks to those who have responded so far. The info is encouraging regarding the Cayenne reliability. I will admit that I had no idea that certain one were prone to bore scoring. Damn. I am on my second Cayman. Because my first one fell victim to just that.

So far it seems that I should be looking for a 2009-2011. V6 or V8 but not a turbo. This is because it seems the prior years can suffer bore scoring. Is this true? Mileage in the 125k range does not seem to me an issue if maintenance records indicate a well cared for car. I think I want to stay away from air suspension due to future repair costs.

Or is it safe to look at 2005/2006/2008's?

Thanks to all and please keep the help coming.
 

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Some "fact" corrections:

The V8 water pumps are identical and identical to swap on the turbo and normally-aspirated models. The alternators are the same, but there may be a bit less clearance on the turbo one. Luckily since these are water-cooled they seem to be exceptionally long-lasting.

The bore scoring was not caused by oil, by cold weather or close tolerances. It was caused by the engine block bore treatment. There were two sources of blocks that Porsche used between 2003 - late 2009. Starting around late 2009 they went to one source for the blocks and the problem went away (those engines were used in the 2010 models.)

There are almost no reported bore scoring problems on the 2009 and newer V8 engines.* In my experience - there has been no difference in service costs/requirements between a normally-aspirated V8 and a turbo V8 (but I've owned both so what would I know..?) There would be a difference if you needed to replace engine mounts, but so far at 108,000 miles on my '11 Turbo I haven't felt the need to.

* = I ran a survey back when I was a moderator at the other Porsche (the unfriendly one mentioned in my sig) on bore scoring. It has a LOT of information in it, as did the thread about the findings. The takeaway from the survey was that beginning in 2010 - there were basically no bore-score failures reported on the V8 engines.

If looking at 2005/2006/2008's - I'd only be comfortable if I had the resources to replace the engine if needed (with a used one). That also means getting them at a price that makes that a logical thing to do. Paying high for one and then finding it needs an engine - well, that would make me very uncomfortable.

As @CDebruyn said - they're big heavy fast cars and they consume things associated with big heavy fast cars (tires, brakes, fuel.) There are a few weak points, but in general, those are known (cardan shaft bearing support failure) and workarounds have been found.

Personally, I've found the 958 series more satisfying to own than my 955 series was, but my 958 is a turbo and was very heavily optioned when the original owner ordered it. Happily, these options which easily added $30,000 to the price when new brought pennies on the dollar on a used car, so I'm enjoying the first owner's largess.
 
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