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I am taking the car out of town this weekend and while I have a tire patch and plug kit (from Slime, never used it but would like to hear from anybody who has) I'd like to make sure that the tire sealant works before trying to plug.

Since I bought the car used early this year let's just assume the tire sealant has never been replaced; does this stuff have a shelf life? If so it seems like it'd be worth a small investment to run over to the Porsche store near me and grab a fresh one.

Thoughts?
 

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Shelf life of fix-a-flat and slime is 4-5 years under ideal conditions, less if it's baking in the frunk of a hot Porsche. Don't bother with the Porsche dealer or pay the Porsche tax, you can pick up a new can of sealant in just about any store. I don't bother with sealant, just the compressor and a plug kit.
 

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I agree with sjfehr. I wouldn't use the sealant unless it was a last resort. The sealant might get you home but afterwards it creates other problems like getting it cleaned out and wheel balancing problems.

The plug kit and the compressor will save the day in most cases. Just make sure you know how to use the plug kit. The first time I used mine with the wheel on the car it was a little tough getting the plug in due to getting the required leverage while lying on the ground.
 
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The Maintenance Schedule http://www.planet-9.com/981-cayman-...81-maintenance-schedule-do-items-summary.html for 981s says SLIME KIT is to be replaced at the 4 yr service interval.

If you use the Porsche supplied Slime Kit, Dealers and others have said once it is used to get you home/to service, then you will need to GET a NEW tire, thoroughly clean rim and replace the TPM valve all before an effective re-balance can be done. Use of a plug is OK according to most if issue not a sidewall

So if no plug is possible, best option is to flat bed car to service center/Dealer. Use the Slime Kit as a last resort.

:cheers:
 

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the maintenance checklist in the files section states that it should be replaced every 4 years.
I am wondering how many replace it according to schedule.

my tyre shop tells me that cleaning the gunk out after is a real pain and to call a tow service instead.
 

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I don't think it's as big a deal to clean up as the tire guys say, they just don't want to be bothered with the mess.

As far as plugs go, they're going to be really hard to install without a jack. Hardly any clearance to get the tools in, especially with a flat tire dropping the car a couple inches further. I carry mine for a little peace of mind, but I'm not sure I'd be able to get it in place if/when I needed to. Every time I've successfully plugged a wheel, I've had to take the wheel off in order to get enough leverage to insert it.
 

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Second hand info again but I understand the Porsche tire goop is a bear to clean up. Has to be scraped, peeled off. The real Slime supposedly just wipes off with a rag.

If you've never plugged a tire it can take a lot more force than you'd expect unless the puncture is close in size to the rasp used to prep the hole for pushing rope plug in. It's worse if the tire has no air in it. While I'm sure it's possible to find the puncture, move the car enough to locate it so you can work at all and then push the rasp through it's not going to be fun. This is more doable if the tire will hold some air.

I've always found this simpler if you can get the tire off and hold it between your knees. Get 15 or 20 psi in the tire even if you have to put a thumb over the hole. Then spend a couple extra minutes on prepping the puncture. It's also worth having a pair of needle nose pliers or diagonal side cutters (dikes) to pull the object with. Screws, nails whatever tend to get ground flush to the tread making them hard to pull.

The tire goop always seemed like a feel good thing. I've usually found that if something like that will work the tire can be pumped up well enough to do a short drive on to get to a fix it location. A nail usually doesn't stop you immediately. It's after you stop and come back in a couple hours that you find it. I've had a couple exceptions and then I was glad for the spare as no goo or rope plug was going to fix it. Of course YMMV.

I've not used a Slime plug kit yet though they all seem to be much the same so I hope this helps a bit.
 

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If it's just a nail or screw and only leaking slowly, it's often best just to leave it in and pump it up every so often until you can get a proper patch put in.
That's exactly what I did this past week. Took a nail in the left rear tire - it leaked a little less than a pound per hour, so I was easily able to keep it up to pressure until I could get it fixed.

BTW we complain about them a lot, but the TPMS saved my bacon on this one. With the tire down about 10 pounds from getting the nail the previous night, I got the TPMS alert the next morning. I tend to walk around the car each morning to check the tires, but visually you could not tell the difference between the punctured tire and the healthy one. I will hereby stop complaining about the TPMS and keep those sensors in good order!
 

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Sometimes I wonder if the sidewalls on high performance street/competition tires are stiff enough to function as run-flats in a pinch. Not that I'd try, but they're certainly stiff enough that it's hard to tell when they're low on air.
 
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